Earthling Survey: What Is Your Source of Reliable Climate Change Information

July 11, 2018 by  
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Express your opinion and help drive environmental change. Every week, … The post Earthling Survey: What Is Your Source of Reliable Climate Change Information appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earthling Survey: What Is Your Source of Reliable Climate Change Information

Red List expands to 26,000 endangered species

July 6, 2018 by  
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Japanese earthworms, the Mauritian flying fox and the Bankoualé Palm are joining over 26,000 species categorized as “endangered.” The latest International Union for Conservation of Nature (ICUN) Red List report  now identifies 26,197 plants and animals facing extinction, out of 93,557 facing serious environmental threats around the world. Australia’s reptile population possibly faces the most threats of all species. 975 reptiles native to the island — nearly every cold-blooded animal living there — have joined the list. In addition, seven percent of those are threatened with extinction due to changing environmental factors , including invasive species and climate change. Estimates from ICUN blame 600 million reptile deaths on feral cats, while a one-degree temperature change could cut the Bartle Frere cool-skink population by half over 30 years. Related: Conservationists sound alarm over US House bill that weakens Endangered Species Act While Australia is facing a mass extinction of reptiles, other areas across Asia could lose species over time. The Mauritian flying fox, an important pollinating species on Mauritius and Réunion, was also added to the endangered species list. Deforestation , cyclones, poaching and death from power lines have significantly reduced the population. In Japan, three species of earthworms were also added to the Red List and face extinction. Nuclear fallout from both World War II and the nuclear reactor meltdown in Fukushima, combined with over-farming and city growth, are threatening the species. Animals also aren’t the only species that face extinction before the century’s end. The Bankoualé palm, a plant native to Djibouti, Somalia and Yemen, may also be relegated to textbooks. Between deforestation, drought , destruction from farming and water redirection, the palm could disappear entirely from Yemen first, leaving the Horn of Africa as its only remaining habitat. Although the outlook is grim for the newly endangered species , all hope is not lost. The ICUN is actively working with local populations to ensure both plants and animals can continue to thrive for generations. In Mauritius, a task force is working with farmers to protect crops and orchards with nets and other deterrents, reducing the need for population culling. Via ICUN

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Red List expands to 26,000 endangered species

Eating seaweed could reduce cows’ methane production

July 5, 2018 by  
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Researchers at the University of California, Davis have found a surprising food source that could help reduce cows’ methane production: seaweed. A recent study from the university suggests bovines who eat an experimental mix of special food and a specific strain of seaweed produce less greenhouse gas than their peers. According to Pennsylvania State University , agriculture contributes up to seven percent of America’s greenhouse gas emissions. Each day, ruminal animals (like cows) belch up to 264 gallons of carbon dioxide and methane. As much as 20 percent of agricultural methane emissions comes from animal burps alone. Related: How seaweed eating super cows will save the world To reduce those emissions, UC Davis researchers experimented with new feed combinations for cows. The cows’ hay is mixed with up to one percent of a naturally occurring red algae , Asparagopsis armata. To encourage the cows to eat the new food, molasses is added as a natural sweetener and to mask the salty taste and smell. To measure effectiveness, researchers take the livestock to a special “breathalyzer” chamber three times daily, where cows’ breath is measured for gas content in exchange for a cookie. The cows who ate the seaweed-mixed feed saw a significant reduction in methane production . Across three two-week experiments, cows who ate the highest mix of algae saw their methane production drop by half. The research team called the findings a “dramatic reduction in methane emissions.” But did it change the dairy cows’ milk? Although the seaweed-eating cows produced slightly less milk, the feed didn’t change the milk’s taste. A blind taste-test conducted with 25 people discovered “no off-notes” in the dairy products . Any hints of saltiness or fish did not transfer over to the cows’ milk production. Before seaweed can become a major part of agricultural feed, the industry must overcome several hurdles. This includes changing the seaweed flavor to be palatable to cows and growing enough algae for agricultural purposes. In addition, growing feed must be economically viable for farmers. Using feed to reduce cow emissions is part of a bigger plan to cut greenhouse gases in California. State Senate Bill 1383 mandated that farms must reduce their methane production by 40 percent over the next 12 years. Via NPR

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Eating seaweed could reduce cows’ methane production

Maxine Burkett, Professor of Law, University of Hawaii, climate change law and equity

June 29, 2018 by  
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Maxine Burkett, Professor of Law, University of Hawaii, climate change law, policy, equity, communities.

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Maxine Burkett, Professor of Law, University of Hawaii, climate change law and equity

Joan Barminski, Regional Director, Pacific Region, Ocean Energy Management, technology

June 29, 2018 by  
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Joan Barminski, Regional Director, Pacific Region, Ocean Energy Management, technology

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Joan Barminski, Regional Director, Pacific Region, Ocean Energy Management, technology

Dawn Lippert, CEO, Elemental Excelerator, investments, Hawaii

June 29, 2018 by  
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Dawn Lippert, CEO, Elemental Excelerator, investments, Hawaii.

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Dawn Lippert, CEO, Elemental Excelerator, investments, Hawaii

Roger Morton, General Manager Oahu Transit Services, electric vehicles

June 29, 2018 by  
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Roger Morton, General Manager for Oahu Transit Services talks the electric vehicle transition. 2035 is the goal for public vehicles like buses, and 2045 is the commitment for private vehicles’ electrification. The funding is there for these infrastructure developments, and the action is being taken on the promise.

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Roger Morton, General Manager Oahu Transit Services, electric vehicles

Adam Bumpus, Senior Research Fellow, University of Melbourne, on innovation and blockchain

June 29, 2018 by  
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Adam Bumpus, Senior Research Fellow at the School of Geography at the University of Melbourne, talks his excitement about how accelerators can spur innovation and startups’ technologies, opening new sustainable business models. He also discusses how blockchain can aid the energy revolution.

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Adam Bumpus, Senior Research Fellow, University of Melbourne, on innovation and blockchain

Andrew Robbins, Executive Director CEO, Honolulu Authority Rapid Transportation, electric rail

June 29, 2018 by  
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Andrew Robbins, Executive Director and CEO, Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation, electric rail, electrification, public, transportation.

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Andrew Robbins, Executive Director CEO, Honolulu Authority Rapid Transportation, electric rail

Christine Riccardi, Regional Director of the Office of Infrastructure Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, infrastructure resiliency

June 29, 2018 by  
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Christine Riccardi, Regional Director of the Office of Infrastructure Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, infrastructure resiliency, disruption prevention, self-sufficiency of communities, public-private-partnerships

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Christine Riccardi, Regional Director of the Office of Infrastructure Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, infrastructure resiliency

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