This is how hot it will be in your neck of the woods if we don’t slow climate change

July 11, 2017 by  
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Most of us know that the world is getting hotter – but it’s hard to put that into real perspective, especially when you are arguing with your climate-denying aunt (or, you know, your president). This map makes it easier by showing you how hot your city will be by 2100 if we don’t get emissions under control in comparison to another city. Los Angeles will feel like Belize City, and Chicago will feel like Juarez. And if that doesn’t scare you, consider the fact that many cities in the Middle East – like Baghdad – will be hotter than any current city on Earth. The map isn’t all bad news – it can also show you what will happen if we manage to meet the goals laid out in the Paris agreement instead of letting temperatures climb unchecked. Climate Central worked with the World Meteorological Organization to determine what cities would look like if temps climb 14.4 degrees F across the world by 2100 (or 7 degrees F if we begin to control emissions). Related: This map reveals which countries will survive climate change (and which countries are in big trouble) Climate Central also used to have a US-based map, but the organization said that they decided to create a world map because the conversation has moved away from the US now that Trump has pulled us out of the climate accord. They also decided to focus on urban areas because that is where the greatest number of people live, and cities experience the urban heat island effect, which can make them feel even hotter than more rural areas. + Climate Central via Fast Company image via Depositphotos

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This is how hot it will be in your neck of the woods if we don’t slow climate change

CO2 levels just reached 410 ppm – the highest in millions of years

April 24, 2017 by  
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Remember when carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere hit a terrifying 400 parts per million (ppm)? That’s number’s old news now – concentrations just reached 410 ppm for the first time in millions of years. Last week, researchers at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii recorded the record-breaking level, and scientists warn the rate of increase will only slow when we reduce our carbon emissions . Mauna Loa Observatory scientists just recorded the first CO2 level above 410 ppm since they began recording in 1958. Back then, the first atmospheric CO2 concentration was a mere 313 ppm . In 2013 concentrations hit 400 ppm . Last week’s reading was 410.28 ppm. Related: CO2 levels likely to stay above 400 ppm for the rest of our lives, new study shows University of Southampton professor of isotope geochemistry Gavin Foster told Climate Central, “It’s pretty depressing that it’s only a couple of years since the 400 ppm milestone was toppled. These milestones are just numbers, but they give us an opportunity to pause and take stock and act as useful yard sticks for comparisons to the geological record.” The United Kingdom Met Office put out a CO2 forecast for the first time ever earlier in 2017, and it turned out to be pretty close to reality; they predicted CO2 concentrations could breach 410 ppm in March but very likely would by April. El Niño is partly at fault for spiking levels of CO2, but more than natural factors, humans burning fossil fuels are to blame. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) atmospheric scientist Pieter Tans said, “The rate of increase will go down when emissions decrease. But carbon dioxide will still be going up, albeit more slowly. Only when emissions are cut in half will atmospheric carbon dioxide level off initially.” In a March NOAA article , Tans said the rate of CO2 growth over the last 10 years is 100 to 200 times quicker than the rate Earth saw as it transitioned out of the Ice Age, saying “This is a real shock to the atmosphere.” Via Climate Central Images via Flickr , Flickr  and Wikimedia Commons

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CO2 levels just reached 410 ppm – the highest in millions of years

Lithium-ion batteries made from recycled glass bottles store almost 4x more energy

April 24, 2017 by  
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A team of researchers at UC Riverside developed a low-cost way of turning disgarded glass bottles into lithium-ion batteries that store almost four times more energy and can last much longer than conventional batteries. This could mean significantly fewer charges for laptops, cell phones and electric cars, not to mention reducing waste. The team, led by Cengiz Ozkan, professor of mechanical engineering, and Mihri Ozkan, professor of electrical engineering at UC Riverside, asked themselves whether silicon dioxide found in waste beverage bottles would be able to provide high purity silicon nanoparticles that can be subsequently used for lithium-ion batteries. The three-step process of producing the anodes starts by crushing and grounding glass bottles into fine white powder, silicon dioxide is then converted into nanostructured silicon, followed by coating the silicon nanoparticles with carbon. Related: 94-year-old inventor of lithium-ion cells develops new battery that can store 3 times more energy According to lab test, coin cell batteries that were made using the glass bottle-based silicon anodes considerably outperformed conventional batteries and demonstrated excellent electrochemical performance. The team expect these high-performance batteries to not only extend the range of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles, but also provide extra power with fewer charges to laptops, cell phones, and other gadgets. Photos via University of California, Riverside

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Lithium-ion batteries made from recycled glass bottles store almost 4x more energy

Hacienda San Jose Lavista is a fairytale retreat in San Miguel Allende

April 24, 2017 by  
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Set in the hills overlooking San Miguel Allende, the striking Hacienda San Jose Lavista is a beautiful retreat surrounded by expansive vineyards, lakes, and fields of wild flowers. Designed by architects Jose Seoane Castro and Pedro Urquiza to be a romantic getaway, the idyllic hotel pays respect to traditional building practices – including using adobe as the primary building material. Looking to colonial Mexican architecture for inspiration, Castro and Urquiza used traditional adobe as a primary building material. Adobe allowed the architects to forgo common structural elements, instead creating 50-centimeter thick walls to support the building’s mass. Related:Casa Xixim is an eco-friendly, self-sustaining resort in Mexico Castro and Urquiza reportedly designed the complex to be romantic retreat. In addition to the luxury suites, a picturesque chapel sits on a small pond, creating a picture-perfect setting for weddings or baptisms. Hotel guests can also enjoy various interior and exterior patios, game rooms, a pool and plenty of private nooks that look out over the gardens. Multiple pieces of local art and traditional furniture were used in the hotel’s interior design – another nod to the area’s long artisan history. + Hacienda San Jose Lavista Images via Hacienda San Jose Lavista

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Hacienda San Jose Lavista is a fairytale retreat in San Miguel Allende

Britain sees first coal-free day since the Industrial Revolution

April 24, 2017 by  
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For the first time since Thomas Edison opened the first power station in London in 1882, Great Britain functioned without any coal-fired power plants last Friday. The milestone marks the first continuous 24-hour period without coal since the Industrial Revolution. This isn’t the first time Britain has gone without coal for a significant chunk of the day, but before this, 19 hours was the longest continuous time that coal power was able to go offline. Instead of coal, National Grid relied on a mix of 50.3% gas, 21.2% nuclear, 12.2% wind, 8.3% imports, 6.7% biomass, and 3.6% solar on Friday. While natural gas still isn’t a completely clean power source, it’s nowhere near as polluting as coal , and nuclear power , while it has very real risks, doesn’t spew greenhouse gasses into the environment. In an ideal world, a larger portion of the nation’s energy would come from renewable sources, but for now, simply ditching coal for a day is an accomplishment to celebrate. Days like this will become more and more common as time goes on – in 2016, the UK relied on coal for just 9% of its electricity needs, down from 23% in 2015. By 2025, the country’s last coal power station is slated to close as part of the government’s promises to meet its climate change commitments. Related: European electricity sector pledges no new coal plants after 2020 However, it’s important to remember that eliminating coal is only one piece of the puzzle when it comes to cutting greenhouse gas emissions: the UK government (and, indeed, other governments around the world) still need to tackle the huge amount of carbon generated by other infrastructure and the country’s transportation system. Via The Guardian Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )  

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Britain sees first coal-free day since the Industrial Revolution

Winter Loses its Cool: Climate Central shows us how winter nights will warm by 2100

February 5, 2015 by  
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In spite of last year’s polar vortex , and the recent exceptionally heavy snow fall in the North East, winters are—on average—getting warmer. A new report from Climate Central looks at the number of nights each year that major US cities experience below freezing temperatures, and contrasts them with the number of nippy nights we can expect in 2100, if current warming trends continue. Check out the map to see what’s in store for your area. Read the rest of Winter Loses its Cool: Climate Central shows us how winter nights will warm by 2100 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon emissions , climate central , Climate Change , freezing nights , global warming , interactive map , snowfall , temperature trends , warmer winter , winter , winter warming

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Winter Loses its Cool: Climate Central shows us how winter nights will warm by 2100

Stanford University’s rammed earth Windover Contemplative Center provides a tranquil space for students

February 5, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Stanford University’s rammed earth Windover Contemplative Center provides a tranquil space for students Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Aidlin Darling Design , Andrea Cochran , contemplative center , rammed earth , rammed earth designs , rammed earth works , reflecting pool , sanctuary , stanford , windover , Windover Contemplative Center , Windover rammed earth , Windover University

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Stanford University’s rammed earth Windover Contemplative Center provides a tranquil space for students

Minimalist Rigo Letto bed frame adds an effortless, contemporary feel to the bedroom

February 5, 2015 by  
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Environmentally friendly furniture brand Formabilio recently announced their latest addition: the Rigo Letto , a raised bed frame made from lacquered plywood that boasts a minimalist design and effortlessly adds a contemporary feel to any bedroom. Designed by Arianna Giovacchini, the oriental-inspired poplar plywood legs slot together for easy assembly. The bed frame is varnished with a matt, water-based lacquer in a choice of three different colors: black, light gray, or mole gray; the edges are left exposed with a clear varnish to reveal the plywood texture. The contemporary bed frame is available for single or double beds. + Formabilio The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arianna Giovacchini , bed frame , Formabilio , lacquered plywood , minimalist , plywood , poplar plywood , reader submitted content , Rigo Letto

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Minimalist Rigo Letto bed frame adds an effortless, contemporary feel to the bedroom

Climate change means more volcanic eruptions in Iceland

February 5, 2015 by  
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Iceland is rising. No, it’s not a thrilling new ride at a theme park,  Iceland is literally being lifted by climate change. This means the country is getting more land freed up by melting ice, but it could also mean that more volcanoes will be interrupting flights and wreaking general havoc over the country. Read the rest of Climate change means more volcanic eruptions in Iceland Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , climate change iceland , climate change impacting iceland , climate change volcanoes , Iceland , iceland ice melting , iceland land rising , iceland rising , iceland volcanic activity , iceland volcanoes , increased volcano activity , volcanic activity , volcanoes

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Climate change means more volcanic eruptions in Iceland

‘Missing’ oil from BP disaster located at the bottom of the ocean

February 5, 2015 by  
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When the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burst in 2010, about 200 million gallons of crude oil flooded into the fragile ecosystem of the Gulf of Mexico. While much of that oil washed up on shore or was cleaned up, sometimes using controversial dispersants , there is still a lot of oil unaccounted for. A new study in Environmental Science and Technology reveals that a good portion of that missing oil—about 10 million gallons—is sitting on the floor of the Gulf, where it is wreaking havoc with the sea environment. Read the rest of ‘Missing’ oil from BP disaster located at the bottom of the ocean Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bp disaster , bp oil spill , BP spill , British Petrol oil spill , deepwater horizon oil spill , Deepwater Horizon Spill , gulf coast oil spill , gulf coast oil spill seafloor , Gulf disaster , gulf of mexico oil spill , Gulf oil spill , lost gulf coast oil , missing bp oil , missing gulf coast oil

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‘Missing’ oil from BP disaster located at the bottom of the ocean

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