Movable walls on this Moonlight Cabin allow owners to turn their house inside out

July 20, 2016 by  
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Tucked within its small footprint is a treasure trove of luxuries, all designed to house a small family on vacation. The cabin spans a humble 645 square feet (60 square meters) and includes a fully appointed kitchen and bathroom. In the main living area, a giant U-shaped built-in sofa provides maximum lounge space and a spectacular view from a floor-to-ceiling window , obscured only slightly by a suspended wood stove. The home’s interior is fitted with Victorian ash timber linings coated with limed wood wash, which surround the space in elegant, contemporary style. The minimal interior design and restricted palette create a tranquil environment for relaxation, while carefully selected sustainable materials make the Moonlight Cabin as cost-effective as it is attractive. Related: Cape Schanck House boasts sweeping views of the Australian dune landscape The architects chose Spotted Gum for the cabin’s exterior panels, a native Australian variety of eucalyptus hardwood. The sustainable material is often used in flooring, but here demonstrates the same durable features, particularly the ability to expand and contract naturally in the changing climate. Shutters invite cross-ventilation , as well as offer the homeowners a bevy of privacy options. The shutters can be positioned to open up the interior space to the out-of-doors, or closed to ensure security and safety in the event of a storm, or when the owners are ready to pack up and go back to their primary home overseas. + Jackson Clements Burrows Images via Jeremy Weihrauch/Gollings Studio

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Movable walls on this Moonlight Cabin allow owners to turn their house inside out

Extraordinary ‘British Pompeii’ settlement was preserved in water for 3,000 years

July 20, 2016 by  
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The Cambridge Archaeological Unit is excavating Must Farm , a well-preserved British site that has provided a glimpse into daily life during the Bronze Age. Described as ‘ British Pompeii ,’ Must Farm was destroyed quickly and its buildings sank into water, where the settlement was preserved for the next 3,000 years or so. Now archaeologists are finding everything from textiles to food to a wheel, and describe the site as home to ” an extraordinarily rich range of good and objects .” The excavation at Must Farm is funded by Forterra and Historic England and supported by the University of Cambridge . Like Pompeii, the story of the Must Farm inhabitants ends in tragedy. Because the site is so well-preserved, archaeologists have many clues to piece together what likely happened. Related: UK resident accidentally discovers ancient Anglo-Saxon settlement The Must Farm locals built round homes on stilts above a river. There were about 10 of these wooden homes, and about 30 people lived there. Archaeologists can tell that the oak trees utilized in the homes were cut down in the winter, and the next summer, the entire settlement burned down rapidly in an inferno. Forensic research appears to indicate the fire may have been set on purpose before the residents were able to truly establish their settlement. The remains of the houses and the possessions that fell into the river and river silt were preserved in the fens. It appears any survivors may have had to flee given how many possessions were left behind. Archaeologists have found axes, spears, 60 beads (that could have come from Turkey or Syria), linen fragments, and even footprints. There were no skeletons other than a skull that had likely been hung as a trophy on one of the homes. Site manager Mark Knight told CNN, “I think I’ve found a landscape that has a story; a landscape that hasn’t been described before, hasn’t been visited before. We are the first people to explore it.” Via CNN Images via Must Farm Archaeology Facebook

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Extraordinary ‘British Pompeii’ settlement was preserved in water for 3,000 years

A tiny beach shack in Essex wrapped in "magic" cork panels

July 20, 2016 by  
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The artist couple who commissioned the design, which replaces a “dilapidated timber framed 1920s beach house”, wanted a weekend home that would “surpass planning requirements in terms of flood risk mitigation, building control requirements in terms of part L, and expectations in terms of design innovation,” Lisa Shell told Inhabitat. She designed the home to resemble a “hide” that provides the residents with “privacy, peace, and a sense of isolation and distance.” But it also had to overcome a few site challenges – including floods that recently swathed the area in a meter of water, according to The Guardian . Related: Amazing hairdryer made with glass and cork Elevated on red steel stilts like a Redshank wader, the home is constructed in CLT with a 180mm thick expanded cork agglomerate overcoat. The cork panels are created from the by-product of wine cork production in Portugal, according to Shell, using only heat and compression to form a chemical bond between cork chips. Unusually, the designers decided not to apply a polyurethane coating to the panels, resulting in a bleached grey color facade with black flecks. An airtight enclosure, Redshank is heated with a small wood burning stove – reducing the energy required to keep the space warm. The new house increases the amount of land available to fauna and flora within the Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). “Within two months of completion, sparrows have already taken up residence in one of the integrated nesting boxes,” writes Shell. “It was also important that support was won for the unconventional design from the community of both permanent and occasional residents in the small hamlet.” + Lisa Shell Architects

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A tiny beach shack in Essex wrapped in "magic" cork panels

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