‘World’s first floating kitchen’ is a food truck for the seas

January 22, 2018 by  
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Hungry jet skiers or boaters could soon be able to cruise up to a floating kitchen in Dubai and order food. Aquatic Architects Design Studio (AADS) came up with Aqua Pod , dubbed the world’s first floating kitchen – and Gulf News said it will be coming to the city later this month. Aqua Pod takes the idea of a food truck to the water. The floating structure will make it easy for those in marine crafts to grab a snack. AADS founder Ahmad Yousuf told Gulf News there are two potential ordering systems: in one, a delivery jet ski from the Aqua Pod passes out flags to boats or yachts , and boaters raise their flag to make an order. The delivery jet ski will take orders and deliver food. In the second scheme, people can jet right up to Aqua Pod to place an order – although that system would only work for smaller crafts. Related: Floating Solar Orchid Pods Could Bring Pop-Up Restaurants to Singapore’s Waterfront What food will Aqua Pod offer? Burgers, to start. Yousuf said their client went with burgers because it’s an easy meal to eat, although they might expand the menu to include pizza or desserts depending on how successful the concept is. Electricity will power the floating kitchen. But won’t it leave a lot of litter in its wake? Yousuf told Gulf News the pod “has a built-in system that allows it to collect any trash in the sea. So even if someone makes an order from us and then throws that trash into the sea – which is out of our control – the Aqua Pod can take in all that waste into one of its tanks, which is then discharged afterwards.” The Aqua Pod can easily move around, floating to where the demand is. Yousuf told Gulf News it will start operating in Jumeirah, and reach areas like “Al Sufouh Beach, Kite Beach, and the Palm Lagoon one and two.” + Aquatic Architects Design Studio Via Gulf News Images via Aquatic Architects Design Studio and Christoph Schulz on Unsplash

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‘World’s first floating kitchen’ is a food truck for the seas

Huge factory turned into a cozy residence with plenty of room leftover for the residents’ hobbies

January 16, 2018 by  
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This former factory in Nobeoka, Japan, now functions as a modern home for a couple who wanted to preserve the industrial legacy of the building. Considering the fact that the building was large enough to house production and manufacturing facilities, Schemata Architects reorganized the layout to include several voids that will serve as areas where the owners can enjoy their future hobbies. The building occupies a corner lot in Nobeoka, Miyazaki Prefecture in Japan . It grew over time to reach its current total area of 4736 square feet (440 square meters) distributed across two floors. The project started as an initiative organized by a Japanese magazine BRUTUS, which invited readers who wanted to renovate their houses as well as several selected architects, and matched each reader to their favorite architect. Related: Tokyo factory is transformed into an industrial-chic Blue Bottle Coffee cafe Schemata Architects renovated the building working in close collaboration with the client and his wife, who wanted the project to preserve the history of the building. In discussing the design, the team reached the conclusion that the optimal size of the residential part would be as small as 1829 square feet (170 square meters). This meant that there was a large unused floor area that had to somehow be incorporated into the concept. They decided to keep these spaces as voids that will accommodate the clients’ future passions and hobbies. “Such voids, created somewhere between the interior and the building envelope , generate a dynamic space that raises expectations for something to happen,” said the architects. + Schemata Architects Photos by Takumi Ota

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Huge factory turned into a cozy residence with plenty of room leftover for the residents’ hobbies

Green-roofed Viewpoint Granasjen is a modern take on the traditional Norwegian hut

December 1, 2017 by  
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The traditional Norwegian hut got a brilliant update with this modern, sustainable retreat that offers stunning views of the country’s fjords and mountains. Bergersen Arkitekter AS designed Viewpoint Granasjøen as a combination of shelter and summer house that recreates the old Norwegian Gapahuk (English: lean-to) as a multi-functional, flexible space that can be used throughout the year. The structure functions as a  summer house  escape, complete with grill, shed, and bathhouse, and was designed in close collaboration with the client and his specific needs and requirements. It is clad in dark brown stained wood that matches the main cabin on the property. A turf roof provides additional insulation and is angled to blend into the landscape. Related: Coastal cabin in Norway is a perfect indoor retreat for outdoor lovers Large sliding glass panels provide a direct connection to and offer expansive views of the surroundings. The interior is simple, with a custom-built bench for seating and a small built-in fireplace . + Bergersen Arkitekter AS Via Plataforma Arquitectura Photos by Kjetil Nordø

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Green-roofed Viewpoint Granasjen is a modern take on the traditional Norwegian hut

Starburst shipping container home to rise in the California desert

September 27, 2017 by  
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Don’t rub your eyes—this incredible shipping container home is not a mirage. London-based designer James Whitaker is bringing his crystalline cargotecture vision to life with the Joshua Tree Residence in a rocky California desert. Arranged in a spectacular starburst fashion, the sculptural house will be powered by solar energy and optimized for protection against the desert’s harsh elements. If the Joshua Tree Residence looks familiar, you may be remembering James Whitaker’s previous unrealized work, Hechingen Studio , proposed as an office in Germany. Whitaker earned the opportunity to bring his crystalline cargotecture vision to reality when the client, a film producer who lives in Los Angeles, saw a rendering of Hechingen Studio on a trip to Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California. The client, who owns a 90-acre property near the park, commissioned Whitaker to design a similar structure as a holiday dwelling for him and his wife. “With a background in nurturing creative projects to fruition, [the client] is, in many ways, the dream client!” said Whitaker, according to Dezeen. Related: James Whitaker designs funky light-filled office space out of shipping containers The Joshua Tree Residence may look eccentric, but its sculptural appearance isn’t out of place for the California desert , where L.A. wealthy often commission unusual-looking homes. The 2,153-square-foot cargotecture home will be elevated on concrete columns over a sloped site and surrounded by a rocky landscape with loose boulders. The home’s shipping container elements will be painted bright white and extended in all directions. ”Each container is orientated to maximise views across the landscape, or to use the topography to provide privacy, depending on their individual use,” added Whitaker. The modern and minimalist interior will features angular, white-painted surfaces with simple plywood furnishings and bright red Misfits seating by Ron Arad . + James Whitaker Via Dezeen Images via James Whitaker

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Starburst shipping container home to rise in the California desert

Zaha Hadid Architects unveils designs for wave-inspired Melbourne apartment tower

September 27, 2017 by  
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Zaha Hadid Architects has unveiled designs for the Mayfair Residential Tower, a luxury mixed-use building in Melbourne with spectacular views. Clad in a wave-inspired façade with sculptural bespoke interiors, the 19-story Mayfair draws inspiration from Australia’s landscapes and seascapes. The AUD$330million project will comprise 158 apartments, ranging from 70 square meters to 556 square meters, that will be stacked above ground-floor double-height civic spaces housing a restaurant cafe. Located along a major spine of Melbourne on St. Kilda Road, Mayfair Residential Tower will occupy prime location with enviable views of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Port Phillip Bay, Albert Park, and the skyline of the Central Business District. Zaha Hadid Architects optimized surrounding views by designing large balconies for each apartment as well as floor-to-ceiling glazing . The generous use of glazing and emphasis on outdoor living and views blur the line between building and city, exterior and interior. As with many of Zaha Hadid Architects’ iconic projects, Mayfair features a computational parametric design with complex and eye-catching architectural geometries. In addition to its sculpted effect, the building’s facade was built with an optimizing algorithm to minimize the number of different facade panels required to keep the design within budget. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects designs ecological residential complex for Mexico’s Riviera Maya “Taking its cues from the fluidity within Australia’s landscapes and seascapes, the façade’s composition has evolved from a system of simple wave formations that is further developed to generate variables of the same design language,” wrote the architects. “Using algorithms to determine these variables enables the façade to adapt to the wide variety of different apartment layouts and also adapt to the irregular site.” + Zaha Hadid Architects Images by VA, MrPStudios, and mir

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Zaha Hadid Architects unveils designs for wave-inspired Melbourne apartment tower

Surprisingly modern hut in the Scottish Highlands is insulated with heather, moss and stone

July 20, 2017 by  
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This small hut nestled in the Scottish Highlands combines the influences of Le Corbusier’s iconic Chapelle Notre Dame du Haut and those of the region’s vernacular architecture . The building, designed by Moxon Architects , is covered with heather, moss and stone gathered from local hillsides, which provide both camouflage and additional insulation. The Culardoch Shieling hut sits in the grounds of the client’s Highland estate in the mountains of Cairngorms National Park in Scotland . Its rectangular windows reference Le Corbusier’s famous Ronchamp cathedral, while its overall form and materials establish a connection with the area’s vernacular architecture, livestock holdings and Scottish farming crofts in particular. Related: A green-roofed Hobbit home anyone can build in just 3 days The choice of natural materials and construction technique reflects the client’s request that the building have minimal impact on the terrain. Exterior walls made from unprocessed larch wood envelop the interior lined in spruce. A large dining table and wood-burning stove dominate this cozy space and facilitate social gatherings. + Moxon Architects Via Dezeen

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Surprisingly modern hut in the Scottish Highlands is insulated with heather, moss and stone

Off-grid shipping container cabin has a warm wooden interior

March 31, 2017 by  
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Shipping container residences can be elaborate and complex, but sometimes bringing it back to basics is the key to good living. At the request of their client, San Francisco-based architects  YAMAMAR  created a simple, off-grid container cabin getaway out of two  repurposed shipping containers tucked into a pristine natural forest in North California’s Mount Lassen area. The container cabin is located on 1,000 acres of pristine wilderness. The idyllic location is next to an old creek bed with amazing sunset views of the surroundings. At the request of the property owner, who had been previously using an old Fleetwood trailer to sleep on site, the new structure had to fit into this natural area by operating completely off-grid . Working within the restrictions set by the local nature conservancy for permanent structures, the team began by customizing two shipping containers off site. This reduced the project’s overall footprint and production costs. Related: A glazed container cabin that reflects the Colorado sky Once fused together, the new cabin was built out with simple materials such as  reclaimed Douglas fir panels on the flooring and walls. To generate power, a solar array was installed on the roof, but the home uses propane for most of its lighting and heating needs. The adjacent creek is the home’s natural source for fresh water. In contrast to some luxury dwellings found in the world of shipping container design, this off-grid cabin was meant to offer the basics and keep the focus on the amazing setting. The compact interior is equipped with a small kitchen and one bedroom with a large window that offers incredible views. Two sliding doors on either side of the home roll open on castors and can be locked up tight when not in use. + YAMAMAR Design Via  Dwell Photography by Bruce Damonte

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Off-grid shipping container cabin has a warm wooden interior

Beautiful cabin pops up in ten days with minimal landscape disturbance

February 20, 2017 by  
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BIO Architects recently completed a modern modular cabin, proving yet again how beautiful homes can be affordable with the help of prefabrication . Commissioned by a young couple that desired a cost-effective home on the lake, the prefabricated cabin is the latest iteration in the Russian firm’s line of modular Dubldom homes. The dwelling, located at Pirogovo Lake in the suburbs of Moscow, was installed in roughly ten days with minimal site impact. The lakeside cabin, named DublDom 2.110, is the client’s second Dubldom commission following BIO Architects’ completion of a compact 40-square-meter Dubldom house in 2015. Since none of the firm’s standard prefabricated models were suitable for the site, the architects created a custom design that still retained the Dubldom’s iconic gabled shape and full-height glazing . To keep costs at a minimum, the new 185-square-meter build was constructed with natural and affordable materials that help blend the home into the forested environment. “Most of the individual decisions are based on a simple technology and inexpensive materials, so we managed to follow one of the basic principles of DublDom company—quality of architecture at an affordable pricing,” wrote BIO Architects. “The front facade with the maximum number of glazing was dictated by location of the house on the site. All the technical and utility rooms are located along the rear facade, and the children’s room, office, main entrance and the living room with fireplace look at the site with a wonderful view on the water.” Related: Affordable DublDom prefab home pops up in just one week The modules were prefabricated in Kazan and were delivered with the interior trim, utilities, furniture, and electrical equipment pre-installed. Installation on-site took roughly ten days to complete. + BIO Architects

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Beautiful cabin pops up in ten days with minimal landscape disturbance

Friends and family help repurpose a concrete carport into an inspiring home for an ALS patient

December 6, 2016 by  
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This temporary residence facilitates both physical and mental accessibility for a client diagnosed with ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis). With the help of more than a 100 friends and family of the client, design studio Wim Goes Architectuur repurposed an existing concrete carport, which proved to be more suitable than the existing house, and created an environment that focuses on hope instead of sickness. Once the client no longer needs the space, most of the construction materials can be recycled or reused, celebrating the circle of life. The architects met with the client’s ergotherapist to figure out a solution that would work best for the client’s limiting circumstances. They converted the existing concrete carport into a barrier-free space built with the help of more than 100 friends and family members, and tutoring from professionals experienced with sustainable heating , ventilation, and home automation . Related: Assisted living home replicates a friendly American neighborhood to help treat patient memory loss After demolition, 83% of the project – straw and loam – will be used for fertilizing the landscape. All the technical equipment is returnable, while glass, metal and wood elements can be recycled . The entire project, including its construction, was designed to celebrate the circle of life. + Wim Goes Architectuur Via Archdaily Photos by Filip Dujardin

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Friends and family help repurpose a concrete carport into an inspiring home for an ALS patient

Bespoke NightRider bicycle is made from sustainably sourced wood

February 1, 2016 by  
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Selva , the European makers of handcrafted wooden bicycles , has just unveiled their latest bespoke creation: the NightRider. Created through the combination of traditional Swiss and Italian techniques with industrial technology, the bicycle features a handsome timber frame crafted from exotic and sustainably sourced Padauk and Wenge woods. The bespoke NightRider bicycle can be customized to the client’s requirements for a smooth and comfortable ride. + Selva The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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