Danish-inspired holiday cabin is a dreamy Pacific Northwest hideout

July 19, 2018 by  
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Seattle-based design practice Prentiss + Balance + Wickline Architects is no stranger to creating charming cabins that embrace nature in the Pacific Northwest . So when a local family tapped the firm for a vacation home on a wooded plot overlooking the Hood Canal, the architects delivered with a clean and modern dwelling thoughtfully integrated into the site. Called ‘The Coyle’, the gabled buildings draw inspiration from the owner’s Danish roots and are wrapped in dark-stained cedar siding to recede into the surroundings. Located on a meadow of a long peninsula facing the Hood Canal, The Coyle is backed by a dense Douglas Fir forest and overlooks views of the water. The architects used the classic Danish sommerhus (summer cottage) for the starting point of their design, which emphasizes “clean, economical forms and materials.” Since the clients were on a budget, care was taken to integrate the site’s existing structure, which was repositioned and remodeled. “The angle of the cabins to one another was carefully decided to maximize views while still being aware of the additional burden it might place on the budget,” explain Prentiss + Balance + Wickline Architects. “The clean, minimal finishes selected by the clients — and their hands-on approach that included staining the cedar siding — also helped bring the costs down.” Related: An old 1930s home gets a modern makeover into a cozy beach cabin The clients, a family of outdoor enthusiasts, were also keen to adopt an indoor-outdoor living experience. In response, the architects separated the program into three gabled structures, each of which opens up to generously sized decks through wood-framed glazed doors. Ample glazing brings plenty of natural light to the interior, which is minimally dressed with white-painted walls, beamed ceilings and light timber floors. The holiday home is spacious enough to accommodate the client’s family as well as visiting guests. + Prentiss + Balance + Wickline Architects Images by Alexander Canaria and Taylor Proctor

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Danish-inspired holiday cabin is a dreamy Pacific Northwest hideout

Energy-plus home is a beacon of sustainability in Tel Aviv

July 17, 2018 by  
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Israeli architecture firm Geotectura recently completed a striking modern home that can produce more energy than it needs. Located in Tel Aviv , the energy-plus home — called the Eco360 — combines traditional passive design principles with improved energy-efficient systems such as solar photovoltaic panels and a gray water system. The sustainable house also embraces views of the outdoors and offers plenty of natural light. The project brief was for a modern home that could elegantly incorporate sustainable features with minimal maintenance. The client desired a house that would serve as an environmentally-friendly example for other developments. In addition to being equipped with solar panels and a gray water system, the Eco360 house also features durable and recycled materials . Aided by the mild Mediterranean climate, the energy-plus home requires little, if any, heating thanks to its highly efficient insulation and passive solar design . The energy generated from simple household items, like a hair dryer, can be enough to heat the home. Due to the client’s desires to embrace views of the sea to the west, Geotectura doesn’t face south as recommended in traditional passive solar design teachings. As a result, the architects used BIM (Building Information Modeling) to determine the optimal building envelope and positioning to harness passive design features while facing west. Related: Incredible rooftop farm takes over Israel’s oldest mall to grow thousands of organic vegetables “The client’s hope is that the house will inspire others to consider ways in which they can also use these green principles in building and that it will serve as a model of efficiency and environmental sensitivity,” wrote Geotectura in its project statement. “The house reveals and reflects the ideas of sustainability with more than 50 green design features. The hope is to raise awareness about green design challenges and solutions.” + Geotectura Via ArchDaily Images by Lior Avitan

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Energy-plus home is a beacon of sustainability in Tel Aviv

Natural light floods this energy-efficient Dublin home from all sides

July 2, 2018 by  
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London and Dublin-based design practice Anthro Architecture recently completed Villa 9010, a light-filled dwelling that takes cues from the region’s breezy seaside vernacular. Located in Dakley, South County Dublin, the energy-efficient Villa 9010 was completed for a young family in the side garden of the client’s redbrick childhood home. Triple-glazed windows combined with underfloor heating, highly efficient insulation, an air-to-air heat pump and mechanical heat recovery ventilation ensure a low-energy footprint with a BER rating of A2. Villa 9010 is a contemporary, energy-efficient take on the nearby buildings found in the coastal village and is also inspired by the grandeur of the eye-catching 19th-century castellated school gates next door. Constructed in the place of the client’s former garage and boat shed, the new steel-framed and concrete masonry villa is divided into two levels, with the primary living spaces placed on the ground floor while the four bedrooms are located above. A cantilevered oak staircase that connects the two floors serves as a focal point and the open risers offer views to the sunken living area and rear garden. “The Client[s] were drawn to the sense of optimism and escape that comes with a seaside villa and sought to create a light-filled energy efficient home suitable for a young family that was in-line with their modest budget,” wrote Anthro Architecture in a statement. “Defined by the imposing 19th century castellated gates to the neighbouring school, the design carefully carves a space for a new residential dwelling, nestling itself respectfully beside its prominent neighbour while also drawing on the wider context of the bright seaside villas in the surrounding area.” Related: Incredible glass home stays comfortably snug even in extreme temperatures The interiors are minimally dressed with white walls and oak floors that emphasize the play of light throughout the home. Aluminum-framed timber glazing overlooks views of the outdoors. The most light-filled space in the house is undoubtedly the double-height library illuminated by skylights and a large south-facing triple-glazed atrium . + Anthro Architecture Images by Ste Murray

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A 1940s home gets a modern update with reclaimed materials

May 26, 2018 by  
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Australian studio Porter Architects has sensitively restored and updated a 1940s dwelling in Lake Wendouree, Australia into a modern and light-filled family home. Large windows, contemporary furnishings and finishes breathe new life into the Ballarat property, but the clients and architects were also careful to preserve the home’s original historic elements as well. As a result, recycled and reclaimed materials were used throughout the renovation. Renovations can often be stressful affairs, especially when it comes to older properties like the Lake Wendouree House. Fortunately, however, clients Tom and Meeghan McInerney bought a home that had been extremely well looked after. Its previous owners were two sisters who had lived there for 60 years and kept detailed records for maintenance. Careful upkeep also meant that the original timber paneling and decorative plasterwork were kept in pristine condition. However, the home felt too dark for the couple, who wanted a home that not only was filled with natural light , but would also embrace the outdoors. To preserve the existing architecture as much as possible, Porter Architects created a contemporary extension that opens up to the north-facing backyard and timber patio through large windows and a folding operable glass wall. The Lake Wendouree House’s original front, which they kept intact, contains bedrooms, bathrooms and a study, while the new addition serves as the heart of the home with an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room. Unsurprisingly, the client’s favorite room is the light-filled kitchen that features a marble backsplash and counters. Related: Mid-century Dutch farmhouse gets a bold contemporary makeover To match the existing hardwood floors found in the original structure, the architects installed recycled floorboards in the rear extension. To give the traditional brick exterior a modern refresh, the architects added timber paneling and added reclaimed 1940s bricks in a contemporary pattern. The extension’s minimalist interior features whitewashed walls, timber paneling and furniture, and contemporary furnishings and fittings. + Porter Architects Images by Derek Swalwell

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A 1940s home gets a modern update with reclaimed materials

‘World’s first floating kitchen’ is a food truck for the seas

January 22, 2018 by  
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Hungry jet skiers or boaters could soon be able to cruise up to a floating kitchen in Dubai and order food. Aquatic Architects Design Studio (AADS) came up with Aqua Pod , dubbed the world’s first floating kitchen – and Gulf News said it will be coming to the city later this month. Aqua Pod takes the idea of a food truck to the water. The floating structure will make it easy for those in marine crafts to grab a snack. AADS founder Ahmad Yousuf told Gulf News there are two potential ordering systems: in one, a delivery jet ski from the Aqua Pod passes out flags to boats or yachts , and boaters raise their flag to make an order. The delivery jet ski will take orders and deliver food. In the second scheme, people can jet right up to Aqua Pod to place an order – although that system would only work for smaller crafts. Related: Floating Solar Orchid Pods Could Bring Pop-Up Restaurants to Singapore’s Waterfront What food will Aqua Pod offer? Burgers, to start. Yousuf said their client went with burgers because it’s an easy meal to eat, although they might expand the menu to include pizza or desserts depending on how successful the concept is. Electricity will power the floating kitchen. But won’t it leave a lot of litter in its wake? Yousuf told Gulf News the pod “has a built-in system that allows it to collect any trash in the sea. So even if someone makes an order from us and then throws that trash into the sea – which is out of our control – the Aqua Pod can take in all that waste into one of its tanks, which is then discharged afterwards.” The Aqua Pod can easily move around, floating to where the demand is. Yousuf told Gulf News it will start operating in Jumeirah, and reach areas like “Al Sufouh Beach, Kite Beach, and the Palm Lagoon one and two.” + Aquatic Architects Design Studio Via Gulf News Images via Aquatic Architects Design Studio and Christoph Schulz on Unsplash

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‘World’s first floating kitchen’ is a food truck for the seas

Huge factory turned into a cozy residence with plenty of room leftover for the residents’ hobbies

January 16, 2018 by  
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This former factory in Nobeoka, Japan, now functions as a modern home for a couple who wanted to preserve the industrial legacy of the building. Considering the fact that the building was large enough to house production and manufacturing facilities, Schemata Architects reorganized the layout to include several voids that will serve as areas where the owners can enjoy their future hobbies. The building occupies a corner lot in Nobeoka, Miyazaki Prefecture in Japan . It grew over time to reach its current total area of 4736 square feet (440 square meters) distributed across two floors. The project started as an initiative organized by a Japanese magazine BRUTUS, which invited readers who wanted to renovate their houses as well as several selected architects, and matched each reader to their favorite architect. Related: Tokyo factory is transformed into an industrial-chic Blue Bottle Coffee cafe Schemata Architects renovated the building working in close collaboration with the client and his wife, who wanted the project to preserve the history of the building. In discussing the design, the team reached the conclusion that the optimal size of the residential part would be as small as 1829 square feet (170 square meters). This meant that there was a large unused floor area that had to somehow be incorporated into the concept. They decided to keep these spaces as voids that will accommodate the clients’ future passions and hobbies. “Such voids, created somewhere between the interior and the building envelope , generate a dynamic space that raises expectations for something to happen,” said the architects. + Schemata Architects Photos by Takumi Ota

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Huge factory turned into a cozy residence with plenty of room leftover for the residents’ hobbies

Green-roofed Viewpoint Granasjen is a modern take on the traditional Norwegian hut

December 1, 2017 by  
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The traditional Norwegian hut got a brilliant update with this modern, sustainable retreat that offers stunning views of the country’s fjords and mountains. Bergersen Arkitekter AS designed Viewpoint Granasjøen as a combination of shelter and summer house that recreates the old Norwegian Gapahuk (English: lean-to) as a multi-functional, flexible space that can be used throughout the year. The structure functions as a  summer house  escape, complete with grill, shed, and bathhouse, and was designed in close collaboration with the client and his specific needs and requirements. It is clad in dark brown stained wood that matches the main cabin on the property. A turf roof provides additional insulation and is angled to blend into the landscape. Related: Coastal cabin in Norway is a perfect indoor retreat for outdoor lovers Large sliding glass panels provide a direct connection to and offer expansive views of the surroundings. The interior is simple, with a custom-built bench for seating and a small built-in fireplace . + Bergersen Arkitekter AS Via Plataforma Arquitectura Photos by Kjetil Nordø

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Green-roofed Viewpoint Granasjen is a modern take on the traditional Norwegian hut

Starburst shipping container home to rise in the California desert

September 27, 2017 by  
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Don’t rub your eyes—this incredible shipping container home is not a mirage. London-based designer James Whitaker is bringing his crystalline cargotecture vision to life with the Joshua Tree Residence in a rocky California desert. Arranged in a spectacular starburst fashion, the sculptural house will be powered by solar energy and optimized for protection against the desert’s harsh elements. If the Joshua Tree Residence looks familiar, you may be remembering James Whitaker’s previous unrealized work, Hechingen Studio , proposed as an office in Germany. Whitaker earned the opportunity to bring his crystalline cargotecture vision to reality when the client, a film producer who lives in Los Angeles, saw a rendering of Hechingen Studio on a trip to Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California. The client, who owns a 90-acre property near the park, commissioned Whitaker to design a similar structure as a holiday dwelling for him and his wife. “With a background in nurturing creative projects to fruition, [the client] is, in many ways, the dream client!” said Whitaker, according to Dezeen. Related: James Whitaker designs funky light-filled office space out of shipping containers The Joshua Tree Residence may look eccentric, but its sculptural appearance isn’t out of place for the California desert , where L.A. wealthy often commission unusual-looking homes. The 2,153-square-foot cargotecture home will be elevated on concrete columns over a sloped site and surrounded by a rocky landscape with loose boulders. The home’s shipping container elements will be painted bright white and extended in all directions. ”Each container is orientated to maximise views across the landscape, or to use the topography to provide privacy, depending on their individual use,” added Whitaker. The modern and minimalist interior will features angular, white-painted surfaces with simple plywood furnishings and bright red Misfits seating by Ron Arad . + James Whitaker Via Dezeen Images via James Whitaker

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Starburst shipping container home to rise in the California desert

Zaha Hadid Architects unveils designs for wave-inspired Melbourne apartment tower

September 27, 2017 by  
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Zaha Hadid Architects has unveiled designs for the Mayfair Residential Tower, a luxury mixed-use building in Melbourne with spectacular views. Clad in a wave-inspired façade with sculptural bespoke interiors, the 19-story Mayfair draws inspiration from Australia’s landscapes and seascapes. The AUD$330million project will comprise 158 apartments, ranging from 70 square meters to 556 square meters, that will be stacked above ground-floor double-height civic spaces housing a restaurant cafe. Located along a major spine of Melbourne on St. Kilda Road, Mayfair Residential Tower will occupy prime location with enviable views of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Port Phillip Bay, Albert Park, and the skyline of the Central Business District. Zaha Hadid Architects optimized surrounding views by designing large balconies for each apartment as well as floor-to-ceiling glazing . The generous use of glazing and emphasis on outdoor living and views blur the line between building and city, exterior and interior. As with many of Zaha Hadid Architects’ iconic projects, Mayfair features a computational parametric design with complex and eye-catching architectural geometries. In addition to its sculpted effect, the building’s facade was built with an optimizing algorithm to minimize the number of different facade panels required to keep the design within budget. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects designs ecological residential complex for Mexico’s Riviera Maya “Taking its cues from the fluidity within Australia’s landscapes and seascapes, the façade’s composition has evolved from a system of simple wave formations that is further developed to generate variables of the same design language,” wrote the architects. “Using algorithms to determine these variables enables the façade to adapt to the wide variety of different apartment layouts and also adapt to the irregular site.” + Zaha Hadid Architects Images by VA, MrPStudios, and mir

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Zaha Hadid Architects unveils designs for wave-inspired Melbourne apartment tower

Surprisingly modern hut in the Scottish Highlands is insulated with heather, moss and stone

July 20, 2017 by  
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This small hut nestled in the Scottish Highlands combines the influences of Le Corbusier’s iconic Chapelle Notre Dame du Haut and those of the region’s vernacular architecture . The building, designed by Moxon Architects , is covered with heather, moss and stone gathered from local hillsides, which provide both camouflage and additional insulation. The Culardoch Shieling hut sits in the grounds of the client’s Highland estate in the mountains of Cairngorms National Park in Scotland . Its rectangular windows reference Le Corbusier’s famous Ronchamp cathedral, while its overall form and materials establish a connection with the area’s vernacular architecture, livestock holdings and Scottish farming crofts in particular. Related: A green-roofed Hobbit home anyone can build in just 3 days The choice of natural materials and construction technique reflects the client’s request that the building have minimal impact on the terrain. Exterior walls made from unprocessed larch wood envelop the interior lined in spruce. A large dining table and wood-burning stove dominate this cozy space and facilitate social gatherings. + Moxon Architects Via Dezeen

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