Want an equitable clean energy transition? Funding for that already exists

October 8, 2021 by  
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Local leaders should not lose sight of the funding that already exists to accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy.

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Want an equitable clean energy transition? Funding for that already exists

Disaster risk reduction is a group project

October 8, 2021 by  
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Neither government nor business “can do it all” when it comes to disaster risk reduction.

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Disaster risk reduction is a group project

New report shows solar could generate 40% of US energy by 2035

September 10, 2021 by  
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A report prepared by the Energy Department and National Renewable Energy Laboratory shows that the U.S. could increase its solar power generation from the current 3% to 40% by 2035. To achieve this feat, the federal government would need to invest less than $562 billion and support related policies. The report further shows that solar power could be scaled up to generate 50% of U.S. energy by 2050. According to the report, generating solar energy has become affordable thanks to the falling costs in the industry. Related: mySUN combines human energy and solar for a renewable solution To achieve 50%, U.S. solar capacity must reach 1,600 gigawatts. This would cover more than the total electricity consumed by commercial and residential buildings. Though “not intended as a policy statement,” the report may offer inspiration for policymakers. As Becca Jones-Albertus, director of the Energy Department’s solar energy technologies office, said, the report is “designed to guide and inspire the next decade of solar innovation by helping us answer questions like: How fast does solar need to increase capacity and to what level?” The report also addressed the economic implications of expanding solar systems in the U.S. When it comes to green energy, many people debate how it will impact jobs in the energy sector. Those who oppose energy reforms claim that the oil and coal industries provide jobs to millions of Americans and are the backbone of the economy . Would a shift to renewable energy be able to replace the jobs lost in coal and oil? According to Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm, if solar, the “cheapest and fastest-growing source of clean energy , could produce enough electricity to power all of the homes in the U.S. by 2035,” it could “employ as many as 1.5 million people in the process.” Further, transitioning to solar energy could generate an estimated $1.7 trillion in economic gain via reduced health costs associated with air pollution. Via EcoWatch Lead image via Pixabay

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New report shows solar could generate 40% of US energy by 2035

MIT innovation may make fusion energy a reality soon

September 9, 2021 by  
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Commercially viable fusion energy may soon be a reality, following the successful trial of a new superconducting magnetic field. On September 5, scientists at MIT tested a large high-temperature electromagnet for the first time to gauge its strength. The first-of-its-kind magnetic field successfully demonstrated that it was possible to generate commercially viable fusion energy. For decades, scientists have been trying to find a way of capturing fusion energy. The problem has always been the inability to capture more energy than is used. Commonwealth Fusion Systems (CFS), an MIT startup company, is the first firm in the world to achieve this. Related: DC Microgrids, building infrastructure for energy’s future “Fusion in a lot of ways is the ultimate clean energy source,” said Maria Zuber, MIT’s vice president for research and E. A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics. “The amount of power that is available is really game-changing.” Water helps fuels the creation of fusion energy, and “the Earth is full of water — it’s a nearly unlimited resource. We just have to figure out how to utilize it.” In light of the successful demonstration, MIT and CFS are collaborating to build the world’s first fusion device. The demonstration device known as SPARC is scheduled to be completed by 2025. Fusion is what powers the sun. The process involves merging two small atoms into one, which generates an enormous amount of energy. The problem with this process has always been that replicating it on Earth requires higher temperatures than most materials can hold. To solve the problem, scientists use intense magnetic fields to form an “invisible bottle” that contains “the hot swirling soup of protons and electrons.” The MIT innovation introduces changes to the type of magnetic fields used in containing fusion atoms. The project used high- temperature superconductors, which helped create higher magnetic fields in a smaller space. Traditional technology requires a much larger apparatus to create this same kind of magnetic field. The design was made possible due to a new kind of superconducting material becoming commercially available a few years ago. If the process is successful, fusion energy will be able to replace traditional energy sources and get rid of the stubborn carbon emissions problem. Via MIT Lead image via Gretchen Ertl, CFS/MIT-PSFC, 2021

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MIT innovation may make fusion energy a reality soon

This fund is seeking diverse climate tech founders

August 12, 2021 by  
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You could argue that climate tech funds writ large should simply consider their investments using a wider aperture than historically has been the case. But today’s climate, it’s clear that far more systemic support is necessary as we make the clean energy transition.

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This fund is seeking diverse climate tech founders

Tesla earns contract for world’s first solar, wind and storage project

October 20, 2017 by  
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Tesla has won its first contract with Vestas, the world’s largest wind turbine maker, to supply its Powerpack batteries for a project that combines solar power , wind power, and Tesla’s storage technology — the first of its kind in the world. The $160 million project is being managed by Windlab at the Kennedy Energy Park hybrid renewable energy site in North Queensland, Australia. Windlab recently announced that it has been granted funding by the Clean Energy Finance Corporation and the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and it has chosen Tesla, Vestas, and Quanta as its partners. The Tesla/Vestas project at Kennedy Energy Park will consist of 12 Vestas wind turbines , each with a height of 132 meters (433 feet), the tallest in Australia. Tesla’s battery storage technology is particularly helpful in places like Queensland, which boasts strong winds but only during certain times of the day. Tesla’s Powerpacks will allow the wind energy captured during the afternoon to be used throughout the day and night as needed. The project is expected to be completed in about a year and will be fully operational by the end of next year. When completed, the project is estimated to create 100 local jobs and will provide power for 35,000 Australian households. Related: Tesla is shipping hundreds of Powerwall battery systems to Puerto Rico “We believe Kennedy Energy Park will demonstrate how effectively wind, solar and storage can be combined to provide low cost, reliable and clean energy for Australia’s future,” said Roger Price, Executive Chairman and CEO of Windlab. “The broader adoption of projects like Kennedy can…ensure that Australia can more than meet its Paris Commitments while putting downward pressure on energy prices.” This most recent Powerpack news follows efforts by Tesla to bring its battery storage and micro-grid technology to the recovery efforts in Puerto Rico and elsewhere in Australia, in what is expected to be the world’s largest battery installation. Via Electrek Images via Tesla and Depositphotos

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Tesla earns contract for world’s first solar, wind and storage project

Former coal miners receive training for renewable energy jobs

October 3, 2017 by  
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Over half of the United States’ electricity came from coal in 2000. That figure has plummeted to around one third in 2016, and thousands of coal workers have lost their jobs . But former fossil fuel workers have skills that could translate well to jobs like installing solar panels or working on wind turbines . Other programs teaching former miners computer coding and beekeeping are also aiding the transition away from fossil fuels to a greener future. Coal miners once found roles in West Virginia and Wyoming , and now alternative energy training programs in those states offer new hope. For example, there’s Solar Holler in West Virginia, whose goal, according to their website, is to revitalize Appalachian communities with solar power . They’re working with Coalfield Development to train people to become solar panel installers. Coalfield Development is also rehabilitating buildings and starting an agriculture program, including transforming an old mine area into a solar-powered fish farm, according to The New York Times. Related: The wind turbine manufacturer putting unemployed coal miners to work Or there’s Goldwind Americas , a wind turbine manufacturer offering a training program for coal miners that started earlier this year in Wyoming . The miners could help construct a massive wind farm , and the company will employ up to 200 workers to maintain the farm after it’s built. Appalachian Headwaters is another organization providing an alternative for former coal miners. They’re turning an old camp into an apiary, with the goal of helping coal workers and veterans get a start in the honey business. Next year, they’ll give around 150 hives to 35 workers either for free or with a no- or low-interest loan. Solar Holler founder Dan Conant said diversification is important in the area – the solar program so far only trains 10 workers a year. There are challenges in the transition to a clean energy future, but for now, programs like the ones above offer new training and roles for unemployed miners. Via The New York Times and Axios Images via Bureau of Land Management on Flickr and Coalfield Development Corporation Facebook

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Former coal miners receive training for renewable energy jobs

The Power of Business Advocacy to Accelerate a Clean Economy

October 2, 2017 by  
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How does public policy determine clean economy business outcomes?  Why is it imperative for business leaders to leverage their market power to truly accelerate clean energy, climate and sustainability innovations at the policymaking level — especially under this challenging federal administration? A Congressman, Google’s head of energy policy and market development, and a former White House Chief Sustainability Officer turned renewable energy finance entrepreneur share their stories and insights on the way forward.

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The Power of Business Advocacy to Accelerate a Clean Economy

Corporate renewable energy buyers remain undeterred

September 19, 2017 by  
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The vast majority of corporate energy purchasers plans to pick up the pace on renewables in the decade ahead, according to research by GreenBiz and Apex Clean Energy.

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Corporate renewable energy buyers remain undeterred

Hot topic: It takes more than clean power to reach renewables targets

September 19, 2017 by  
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Cargill, General Motors, Kimberly-Clark, Mars and P&G throw their weight behind an effort to take stock of thermal loads.

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Hot topic: It takes more than clean power to reach renewables targets

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