DIY: How to make your own natural deodorant at home

July 31, 2017 by  
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Did you know you can make your own deodorant? It’s not difficult, and you can save money over buying pricey natural deodorants. Best of all, you can mix and match essential oils to create a scent that you really love (or make it unscented). Whether you have sensitive skin or you’re just picky about body care products, making your own natural deodorant is a fun and easy DIY project  you can complete in under an hour. Step One: Gather your materials Most of the ingredients listed below are available in the bulk purchase area of natural food stores or co-ops, as well as online. There are a few ingredients below that can be swapped out, though doing so may slightly change the color, texture, or scent of your deodorant. The recipe listed below makes one batch of deodorant – simply double or triple the recipe to make a larger batch, create different scents, or to share. Ingredients: 1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil 1 Tablespoon Shea Butter (or Cocoa Butter) 1 Tablespoon Baking Soda 1 Tablespoon Arrowroot Powder (or cornstarch) 1 Teaspoon Bentonite Cosmetic Clay (or kaolin) 6 Drops Essential Oil – we used Lavender and Tea Tree Tools: Measuring spoons Mixing spoons Small bowl Small jar or tub to store deodorant in Step Two: Measure coconut oil Measure out one tablespoon of coconut oil and, if it is hardened, mash it in the mixing bowl. RELATED: How to make a summery coconut-sea salt lip scrub Step Three: Measure shea butter Measure one tablespoon of room-temperature shea butter into the bowl and mix it well with the coconut oil. You may substitute room-temperature cocoa butter as well, but it will have a stronger scent. Shea and cocoa butters are a bit harder than coconut oil at room temperature and will help stabilize the deodorant mixture. Step Three: Add baking soda Measure out and add one tablespoon of baking soda. Step Four: Add arrowroot starch Measure out and add one tablespoon of arrowroot starch. This rather unusual ingredient can be found in some larger natural food stores or bulk co-ops, as well as online. If you can’t find any, you can also substitute cornstarch, though its absorptive properties may be slightly lower. RELATED: DIY homemade insect repellent sprays and lotions Step Five: Add clay powder Measure out and add one teaspoon of finely ground cosmetic clay (bentonite or kaolin – found in the bulk or body care section of a natural foods market). Thoroughly mix the deodorant into a thick paste, making sure there are no lumps. Step Six: Add essential oils Add six drops of your favorite essential oil . We used a blend of 3 drops of tea tree oil for its antibacterial properties and astringent odor, in addition to 3 drops of lavender oil for its soothing aroma. Step Seven: Jar it Use a spoon or butter knife to scrape the deodorant into a small jar or other container. You can leave it at room temperature in your bathroom. To apply, simply swipe two or three fingers across the surface of the deodorant and gently rub it into your armpits after a shower. You can put some into a smaller container for travel as well. If you’ve been using commercial aluminum deodorants, you may notice more wetness, but give it a week for your body to adjust. The essential oil blend serves as a deodorant, and the baking soda, arrowroot starch, and clay serve to prevent and absorb perspiration. All photos by Emily Peckenham for Inhabitat

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DIY: How to make your own natural deodorant at home

Shipping container delivers heightened drama to a modern island home

July 12, 2017 by  
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A shipping container brings a sense of drama to this beautiful modern home on the tropical island of Lombok east of Bali. Indonesian architect Budi Pradono designed the Clay House, a luxury residence elevated on concrete stilts with views overlooking the Indian Ocean, paddy fields, and tropical forest. The building, which was conceived as a landmark for the island, is topped with a large shipping container placed at a sharp angle to appear as if it were slipping off. Located on a hill in Selong Belanak, the Clay House (nicknamed Seven Havens) comprises two elevated structures built with locally sourced materials . The 2.2-meter-tall shipping container, for instance, was sourced from the port of a nearby island and was placed at an angle of 60 degrees, creating a tall ceiling for the master bedroom to bring extra natural light indoors. The architect also built the 30-centimeter-thick walls from clay collected 20 kilometers from the site that was mixed by local craftsmen with sand, cement, straw, and cow dung. The board-marked clay walls help keep the interior naturally cool. Related: Modern recycled container house in South Africa operates 100% off grid The contemporary interior is grounded by the use of a natural materials palette that also helps complement the heavy building materials. Flattened bamboo lines the interior, while stone tiling is used throughout. The home is organized with open layouts and positioned to optimize views of the outdoors. + Budi Pradono Via Dezeen Images via Budi Pradono

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Shipping container delivers heightened drama to a modern island home

The worlds largest Delta 3D printer creates nearly zero-cost homes out of mud

August 10, 2016 by  
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-Oe0XmrYps&list=PLKSfMq7r3YonwY430ZYoF9IwCGlkWQ9pU&index=1 Italian innovator Massimo Moretti launched WASP with the goal to “create a means for affordable fabrication of homes , and provide these means to the locals in poverty stricken areas.” WASP’s affordable housing solution combines 3D printing with biomimicry, drawing inspiration from the mud dauber wasp that constructs its home from one of the world’s oldest building materials: mud. The choice of clay and mud inputs for the portable BigDelta was a conscious choice; although many 3D printers use cement, Moretti chose earth because of its low environmental footprint, local availability, and natural insulating benefits . Based on previous prototypes, the BigDelta will presumably build full-size houses using open-source software and a mixture of mud, clay, and plant fibers for reinforcement. Related: Need a home? Now you can 3D print one—out of mud WASP has come an impressively long way in a short span of time, especially considering that the company doesn’t receive any public financing. They revealed their four-meter tall BigDelta prototype last year , and now their first 3D printed home is nearly complete. The BigDelta printer builds thick walls, and it’s able to lay down 60 cm – 1 meter of material every day. According to Moretti, “When the work starts again, we will raise the wall until 4 meters, then we’ll create the door and build the roof. In the future we will test new materials and continue the research on soil and straw.” Their timing is also advantageous. According to their press release: “Building BigDelta is much more than a dream come true if we consider that, by 2030, international estimates foresee a rapid growth of adequate housing requirements for over 4 billion people living with yearly income below $3,000. The United Nations calculated that over the next 15 years there will be an average daily requirement of 100.000 new housing units to meet this demand.” + World’s Advanced Saving Project

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The worlds largest Delta 3D printer creates nearly zero-cost homes out of mud

Award-winning rammed earth home in Spain halves normal CO2 emissions

July 29, 2016 by  
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Presented as a “contemporary vernacular 21st century house,” Castellarnau’s design incorporates a variety of energy and resource-saving strategies. The stone, earth, and straw used in construction comprises 80 percent of the home’s overall weight, and all building materials, including wood, sheep’s wool and hydraulic lime, were sourced from within a 150 kilometer radius. In addition to supporting local suppliers, this drastically reduces the distance materials have to travel, and thereby the amount of greenhouse gas emissions sent billowing into the atmosphere. In a recent press release, Castellernau reported that the lifecycle analysis of this particular design shows a 50 percent reduction in overall emissions. Related: Dome-shaped Earth Bag House in Colombia keeps residents naturally cool Other notable features include thermo-insulating blinds, thermal accumulator clay plastering, and a biomass boiler, all of which are designed to make the most of natural resources available to the client. Strategically-placed windows maximize the amount of natural light reaching the interior, further reducing energy use, and a cistern collects rainwater for reuse. In her quest to research local, traditional architecture over the last decade, the architect has refined old techniques and developed new ones, many of which she has tested on her own home. She is currently working on two more earth architecture projects in Spain, and we are immensely excited to see the results. + Edra Arquitectura Images via Doble Studio

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Award-winning rammed earth home in Spain halves normal CO2 emissions

Canadian clay kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria on contact

February 1, 2016 by  
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Aboriginal Canadians used clay from Kisameet Bay, British Columbia to treat their ailments for centuries – from stomach complaints to skin irritation. Now, researchers have found that there might just be something to the clay’s purported healing properties after all. It turns out this 10,000-year-old deposit of clay is highly effective against many serious antibiotic-resistant infections. Read the rest of Canadian clay kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria on contact

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Canadian clay kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria on contact

World’s largest delta-style 3D printer can print nearly zero-cost housing out of mud

September 18, 2015 by  
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World’s largest delta-style 3D printer can print nearly zero-cost housing out of mud

Drach and Ganchrow recreate ancient Paleolithic tools 3D printing

September 18, 2015 by  
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Drach and Ganchrow recreate ancient Paleolithic tools 3D printing

Fukusada + Pereira’s Faro Eco-Fireplace Is Designed for Impromptu Gatherings

April 5, 2013 by  
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Faro is a portable fireplace designed for bringing people together in a era saturated by technology. Made with clay, an iron frame and an EcoSmart ethanol burner, the piece was designed by Japanese Ryosuke Fukusada and Portuguese Rui Pereira . Concerned that a modern, high-tech world can promote anti-social behavior, Fukusada and Pereira wanted to create an object for warmth , relaxation and gathering. Safe for both indoor and outdoor use, Faro can also be placed outside and use as a wood burner. We have a hunch that Faro will be bringing people together when it premieres at this year’s Milan Design Week ! + Ryosuke Fukusada + Rui Pereira Via Spoon & Tamago Photos by Fukusada and Rui Pereira Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , clay , eco smart , ethanol burner , Faro , green events , green materials , green products , Milan Design Week 2013 , Rui Pereira , ryosuke fukusada , social design , stove , woodburner        

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Fukusada + Pereira’s Faro Eco-Fireplace Is Designed for Impromptu Gatherings

Guilhem Eustache’s Bewitching Fobe House Captures Morocco’s Enduring Mystique

November 18, 2011 by  
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Read the rest of Guilhem Eustache’s Bewitching Fobe House Captures Morocco’s Enduring Mystique Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “natural materials” , “sustainable development” , atlas mountains , belgian , clay , eco design , Green Building , green design , Guilhem Eustache , locally sourced materials , Marrakech , minimalist , morocco , solar gain , sustainable design , sustainable home , tadelakt

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Guilhem Eustache’s Bewitching Fobe House Captures Morocco’s Enduring Mystique

How can I reuse or recycle (or repair) broken terracotta plant pots?

May 9, 2011 by  
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We’ve had an email from Natasha: It seems a good number of my terracotta plant pots cracked in the cold over winter. What can I reuse them for?

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How can I reuse or recycle (or repair) broken terracotta plant pots?

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