Episode 261: Sea changes, strategy shifts

March 26, 2021 by  
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Episode 261: Sea changes, strategy shifts Heather Clancy Fri, 03/26/2021 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (4:22). How infrastructure is banking on green banks Unilever sets out net-zero plan for shareholder vote Power struggle: The looming high-tech battery crisis Features A new wave for ocean adaptation? (19:30) Oceanographer John Englander chats with Senior Editor Deonna Anderson about his upcoming book, ” Moving to Higher Ground: Rising Sea Level and the Path Forward .”   BSR’s take on resilient business strategies (36:55) A new guide from the nonprofit BSR suggests ways companies can anticipate material changes to their operations, develop and test strategies to adapt — ones that will help them become part of “thriving societies.” BSR president and CEO Aron Cramer weighs in with insights. WBCSD’s guide to changing minds on systems change (46:05) The World Business Council for Sustainable Development — and 40 of its member companies — collaborated on Vision 2050: Time to Transform , a “framework for action” for addressing the climate emergency, nature loss and systemic inequity. WBCSD CEO Peter Bakker drops by with more details. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “As I Was Saying,” “Southside,””Vaping in L.A.,” “New Day,” “Sad Marimba Planet” and “Nice Caves” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Oceans & Fisheries Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 56:17 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 261: Sea changes, strategy shifts

Episode 257: Happy Birthday, Bill McDonough; career advice for sustainability pros

February 26, 2021 by  
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Episode 257: Happy Birthday, Bill McDonough; career advice for sustainability pros Heather Clancy Fri, 02/26/2021 – 05:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (1:50). Nestlé and Microsoft on financing circular innovations What China can teach the US about EV fast-charging rollouts Bill McDonough at 70: A look back … and ahead  (featuring interview highlights at 10:40) Features Navigating a successful sustainability career (24:55) How can CSOs shape business resilience? GreenBiz Vice President and Senior Analyst John Davies chats with the authors of a new report from management consulting firm Korn Ferry, ” The Rise of the Chief Sustainability Officer .” Tune in for insights from Korn Ferry experts Raj Chopra, senior principal, and Andrew Lowe, senior client partner. Digging into the debate over soil carbon credits (36:45) The carbon-reduction promises related to regenerative agriculture loom large, and the debate over the value of offsets related to this sequestration is just getting started. GreenBiz Carbon and Food Analyst drops by for a conversation about the divide between “Young Turks” like Nori and CIBO, and “The Establishment” represented by the Ecosystem Services Market Consortium. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “As I Was Saying,” “Introducing the Pre-roll,” “Thinking It Over” and “Knowing the Truth” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Circular Economy Careers Food & Agriculture Carbon Removal Regenerative Agriculture Carbon Removal Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 46:48 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 257: Happy Birthday, Bill McDonough; career advice for sustainability pros

This wallet can tell you about its carbon impact

February 18, 2021 by  
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This wallet can tell you about its carbon impact Heather Clancy Thu, 02/18/2021 – 01:00 For more essays by Heather Clancy, sign up for VERGE Weekly , one of our free newsletters. In early January, I covered personal care products company Aveda’s project to trace and verify the provenance of its vanilla supply using blockchain — and to allow consumers to peek into that information by later this year. It’s not the only consumer brand dreaming about that sort of connection or looking to digital technology as the answer.  Fashion brand Covalent, created to showcase the potential of a biomaterial called AirCarbon made by biotech firm Newlight Technologies, has started communicating with its customers in a similar way. It’s using blockchain software from IBM to track and disclose carbon impact data related to the production of its products, marketed as carbon-negative. Covalent’s metric is called Carbon Date, a 12-digit number stamped on the roughly three dozen SKUs in its product catalog — items ranging from wallets to clutches to smartphone sleeves to tote bags. Consumers can see the data by visiting the Covalent website and entering their unique code. (The test drive at the link shows you the sort of information that is shared.) The Carbon Date is verified with footprint information from carbon accounting firm Carbon Trust, which created a cradle-to-cradle analysis of AirCarbon after an assessment in 2020.  Newlight CEO Mark Herrema told me his company created the Carbon Date concept to appeal to consumers seeking to dig deeper into the environmental claims being made by consumer products brands. “We had this epiphany that GHG emissions seem like such a vague issue … It was about turning this into something tangible,” he says. The material used to create the products, AirCarbon, is made through a renewable energy-powered anaerobic production process in which microorganisms digest air, saltwater and captured greenhouse gases to create a bioderived polymer. According to Newlight, for every one kilogram of AirCarbon produced in this manner, 88 kilograms of CO2 equivalent are sequestered. Hence, Covalent’s ability to make a carbon-negative claim.  Right now, this is a pretty niche brand: The only place you can buy the Covalent items is on the company’s e-commerce site, and at $480 for a tote bag, they’re obviously not meant for the average consumer.  But Debbie Kestin-Schildkraut, marketing and alliances lead for IBM AI applications and the tech firm’s global blockchain ecosystem, says the importance of proving environmental claims is growing. “We are seeing in every study that we do that more and more consumers are willing to change their shopping habits … Blockchain can help build involvement,” she said. IBM’s blockchain technology is being used in some pretty compelling ways, including to track scallop fishing and offer a premium price to certain boats that fish more sustainably than others; and for food safety applications, such as the ones being deployed by Walmart . Recycler Plastic Bank is also using IBM blockchain services to verify its claims . (The same integrator that wrote that application helped Covalent with the Carbon Date project.) To be clear, the life-cycle analysis used for the Carbon Data calculation includes just raw material extraction, transport of raw materials and manufacturing. It doesn’t include the e-commerce cycle, nor does it include end-of-life considerations that are part of circular economy assessments. AirCarbon is billed a “natural, biologically degradable material” similar to wood. If it winds up in the ocean, it can be eaten by microorganisms — much like a banana peel, according to the company’s FAQ. Is this all a publicity stunt? The skeptic in me says yes but I love the creativity and you can’t argue with the need for transparency initiatives that include the consumer. In this way, the Carbon Date initiative echoes similar moves to label food with their carbon impact that have been embraced by the likes of Unilever, Chipotle and Panera Breads. The challenge will be finding an approach that doesn’t require a translation guide for every single consumer production category. Topics Carbon Removal Consumer Products Zero Emissions Blockchain Featured Column Practical Magic Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Every Covalent product comes with a Carbon Date to help educate consumers about the impact of its production. Courtesy of Covalent

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This wallet can tell you about its carbon impact

Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

January 22, 2021 by  
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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs Heather Clancy Fri, 01/22/2021 – 02:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:40). Supporting democracy becomes the measure of leadership The case for buying climate tech from BIPOC and women-owned suppliers When was the last time you chatted with your CIO, CTO or CDO ? Features Is this the secret formula to lower-carbon labs (18:25) Research laboratories use far more energy than commercial offices. Astra-Zeneca risk management lead Pernilla Sörme and My Green Lab CEO James Connelly discuss how the initiative is making a difference. Read the complete story  here . *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Southside” and “Here’s the Thing” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Elsa Wenzel Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Information Technology Technology Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 24:38 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

January 22, 2021 by  
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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs Heather Clancy Fri, 01/22/2021 – 02:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:40). Supporting democracy becomes the measure of leadership The case for buying climate tech from BIPOC and women-owned suppliers When was the last time you chatted with your CIO, CTO or CDO ? Features Is this the secret formula to lower-carbon labs (18:25) Research laboratories use far more energy than commercial offices. Astra-Zeneca risk management lead Pernilla Sörme and My Green Lab CEO James Connelly discuss how the initiative is making a difference. Read the complete story  here . *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Southside” and “Here’s the Thing” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Elsa Wenzel Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Information Technology Technology Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 24:38 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

January 22, 2021 by  
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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs Heather Clancy Fri, 01/22/2021 – 02:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:40). Supporting democracy becomes the measure of leadership The case for buying climate tech from BIPOC and women-owned suppliers When was the last time you chatted with your CIO, CTO or CDO ? Features Is this the secret formula to lower-carbon labs (18:25) Research laboratories use far more energy than commercial offices. Astra-Zeneca risk management lead Pernilla Sörme and My Green Lab CEO James Connelly discuss how the initiative is making a difference. Read the complete story  here . *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Southside” and “Here’s the Thing” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Elsa Wenzel Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Information Technology Technology Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 24:38 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 252: Duty to democracy, lower-carbon labs

Episode 249: 30 Under 30 honorees share revelations, big oil pivots

December 18, 2020 by  
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Episode 249: 30 Under 30 honorees share revelations, big oil pivots Heather Clancy Fri, 12/18/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (3:45). Can Shell pilot a new era of sustainable aviation? The oil and gas industry’s search for purpose in a climate-disrupted world Can California’s cap and trade address environmental justice? BofA, BlackRock and State Street talk stakeholder primacy — and fall short Features The road ahead for sustainable transportation (21:40)   Katie Fehrenbacher, senior writer and transportation analyst for GreenBiz, reflects 10 key trends from 2020 that will — or should — shape priorities in the 12 months ahead. Among them: bridge fuels to zero-emissions fleets; the public transit crisis; and what policies are mapping the journey.  Year-end reflections from the GreenBiz 30 Under 30 (34:35)   As we did at the end of 2019 and beginning of 2020, we feature the voices of our vibrant community in this episode and on Jan. 8. Participants considered this question: What’s the most significant way that the events of 2020 changed your job or perspective as a sustainability professional? What’s your priority for 2021, as a result? Here are six responses from past 30 Under 30 honorees: Jarami Bond, chief storyteller at Bond Studio Holly Beale, program manager, datacenter environmental sustainability, Microsoft Ben Price, NOVA external ventures manager, Saint-Gobain  Catherine Nabukalu, project coordinator, District of Columbia Sustainable Energy Utility Jose Salazar, senior specialist, CSRone Sarah Reed, program manager, Electrification Coalition *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Waiting for the Moment that Never Comes,” “Everywhere,” “Start the Day,” “Looking Back” and “All the Answers”  *Music in this episode by AdmiralBob77: “Two Guitars” and “Sax, Guitar and Organ at the Club”  *This episode was sponsored by Salesforce  Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast Transportation & Mobility Energy & Climate Oil 30 Under 30 Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 45:54 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 249: 30 Under 30 honorees share revelations, big oil pivots

Episode 248: Mastercard CSO, parsing plastics policy, Paris Agreement at 5

December 11, 2020 by  
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Episode 248: Mastercard CSO, parsing plastics policy, Paris Agreement at 5 Heather Clancy Fri, 12/11/2020 – 00:10 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:30). HSBC invests in world’s first “reef credit” system Does 2020 mark a turning point for delivering on the Paris Agreement goals? How do you avoid getting distracted and stay focused on the mission? Features What will Biden mean for the circular economy? (18:20)   Don’t expect the incoming administration to use that nomenclature, but plastics pollution and recycling are far more likely to get national attention. Associate Editor Deonna Anderson chats with GreenBiz’s senior analyst for circular economy issues, Lauren Phipps. How Mastercard is helping spenders restore trees (26:45)   Big brands are leaning into growing consumer interest in supporting products and services that do “better” for the planet. Kristina Kloberdanz, senior vice president and chief sustainability officer of Mastercard, discusses the recent expansion of the Priceless Planet Coalition — which aspires to restore 100 million trees.  Happy 5th anniversary, Paris Agreement (39:25)   Maria Mendiluce, CEO of the We Mean Business Coalition, chats about signs of progress, the power of alliances and how companies can improve disclosure without engaging in greenwashing.  Climate change and healthcare (53:45)   What’s the emissions profile of the powerful healthcare sector? Can we create a circular supply chain for supplies? How should training evolve? Alan Weil, editor-in-chief of Health Affairs, visits with perspective from the journal’s recent report on these issues.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Keeping Stuff Together,” “Southside,” “Night Caves” “New Day,” “Sad Marimba Planet” and “As I Was Saying” *This episode was sponsored by Salesforce and WestRock Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Deonna Anderson Lauren Phipps Topics Podcast Policy & Politics Finance & Investing Consumer Products Paris Agreement Health & Well-being Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 1:06:56 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 248: Mastercard CSO, parsing plastics policy, Paris Agreement at 5

Adidas and H&M join project to scale circular fashion and recycled fibers

December 11, 2020 by  
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Adidas and H&M join project to scale circular fashion and recycled fibers Michael Holder Fri, 12/11/2020 – 00:05 Adidas and H&M Group are among a host of fashion and textile firms to have teamed up for an EU-funded sustainable fashion project announced in late November, which aims to develop a circular economy for clothing that would result in old garments and fibers being recycled into new items for major high street brands. Over three years, the New Cotton Project will see textile waste collected and sorted via consumer apparel take-back programs, then regenerated into cellulose-based textile fibers by Finnish biotechnology specialist Infinited Fiber Company, the 12 project partners confirmed. The resulting fiber will be used to create different types of fabrics for clothing that are designed, manufactured and sold by global sportswear brand Adidas and retail companies in the H&M Group, they explained. The “world first” project is being led by Infinited Fiber Company, alongside a consortium of 11 other companies and organizations spanning the entire supply chain, including manufacturers Inovafil, Tekstina and Kipas, which will use old garments to produce yarns, woven fabrics and denim, respectively. The New Cotton Project was a direct response to major and growing environmental problems in the textile industry relating to the production of raw materials such as cotton, viscose and fossil-based fibers such as polyester. Textile recycling specialist Frankenhuis, meanwhile, has been tasked with sorting and pre-processing the textile waste, and South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences (Xamk) aims to develop a technical solution for the continuous processing of textile waste fibers for pre-treatment, they said. In addition, Revolve Waste has been appointed to collect and manage data on textile waste to estimate feedstock availability across Europe, while RISE — Sweden’s state-owned research institute — has been brought on board to conduct sustainability analyses and manage eco-labelling for garments created through the project. Finally, sustainable fashion platform Fashion for Good has been tasked with leading stakeholder co-operation and communications efforts, with branding support from Finland’s Aalto University and Infinited Fiber Company. Petri Alava, co-founder and CEO of Infinited Fiber Company, said the New Cotton Project was a direct response to major and growing environmental problems in the textile industry relating to the production of raw materials such as cotton, viscose and fossil-based fibers such as polyester. By developing a system to replace some need for virgin fiber and materials, he said the project was “breaking new ground when it comes to making circularity in the textile industry a reality.” “The enthusiasm and commitment with which the entire consortium has come together to work towards a cleaner, more sustainable future for fashion is truly inspiring,” he added. Pull Quote The New Cotton Project was a direct response to major and growing environmental problems in the textile industry relating to the production of raw materials such as cotton, viscose and fossil-based fibers such as polyester. Topics Circular Economy Supply Chain Fashion Textile Waste European Union BusinessGreen Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Photo by  MikeDotta  on Shutterstock.

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Adidas and H&M join project to scale circular fashion and recycled fibers

Episode 247: Biden wish lists, supporting ‘intersectional environmentalists’

December 4, 2020 by  
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Episode 247: Biden wish lists, supporting ‘intersectional environmentalists’ Heather Clancy Fri, 12/04/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (7:35). In the quest for carbon offsets, (almost) anything goes Recycled plastic: There’s market demand, but where’s the supply? Features What Joe Biden could do to cultivate carbon removal innovation (16:35)   Nonprofit Carbon180 has plenty of ideas for how the Department of Energy and the Department of Agriculture can collaborate to cultivate new economic opportunities centered on carbon removal. Co-founder and managing director Giana Amador suggests top priorities. How financial policy could charge up clean energy  (29:00)   Without Congressional control, President-elect Joe Biden will find it tough to pass ambitious climate action, but he can do much by aligning financial policies to address risks associated with climate-fueling activities. GreenBiz Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden offers details.  Biodiversity in fashion (37:35)   Liesel Truscott, director of nonprofit Textile Exchange, and Helen Crowley, a Kering sourcing executive serving as an advisor at Conversational International, discuss a new tool to help the fashion and textile industry understand and measure impacts and dependencies on nature in materials sourcing — and make changes to better support biodiversity.  Inclusive environmentalism (47:37)   Intersectional Environmentalist, an organization seeking to amplify underrepresented, diverse voices in the environmental movement, is teaming with tea company TAZO on a new internship program. Co-founder Sabs Katz addresses why this issue deserves more attention from companies. Read the whole interview. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Knowing the Truth,” “And So Then,” “Thinking It Over,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Introducing the Pre-roll” and “Here’s the Thing *This episode was sponsored by Salesforce and Shell Resources galore Say ‘hy-drogen’ to a decarbonized future. Our latest energy transition webcast at 1 p.m. EST Dec. 8 explores the potential for green hydrogen technologies, with experts from Shell, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Green Hydrogen Coalition. Sign up here . Recycling’s makeover, courtesy of AI and robotics. New technologies are solving logistics logjams and making it simpler to sort more materials. Join the discussion at 1 p.m. EST Dec. 10.  Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Deonna Anderson Sarah Golden Topics Podcast Carbon Removal Carbon Policy Renewable Energy Policy & Politics Racial Issues Environmental Justice Fashion Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 54:53 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 247: Biden wish lists, supporting ‘intersectional environmentalists’

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