Cities around the world lay the groundwork for a zero-waste future

September 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Cities around the world are pledging to reduce waste over the next 12 years in an effort to curb global warming and eventually become zero-waste cities. During the Global Climate Action Summit, the C40 announced a new initiative that encourages cities to eliminate waste production and end the practice of waste burning. So far, 23 cities have agreed to become zero-waste and will work toward that goal by “reducing the amount of municipal solid waste disposed to landfill and incineration by at least 50 percent … and increase the diversion rate away from landfill and incineration to at least 70 percent by 2030,” according to C40 . Each city has agreed to cut down on waste that ends up in landfills by at least half over the next decade. The cities — which include San Francisco, Catalonia, Auckland, Dubai, Copenhagen, London , Montreal, New York City , Milan, Rotterdam, Sydney, Paris , Tokyo, Tel Aviv, Toronto, Washington D.C. and Vancouver — also pledged to reduce waste generation by 15 percent and encourage alternative waste management practices by 2030. Related: 19 mayors, thousands of buildings, zero carbon emissions by 2030 Reducing the amount of waste disposal and incineration is an important step in fighting global warming. Scientists believe that the new initiative could cut global carbon emissions by around 20 percent as cities begin to recycle and compost waste instead of dumping it into landfills or burning it. The 23 cities who signed the zero-waste declarations hope that they will lead by example and encourage other municipalities to do the same. The EPA says that incinerators and landfills significantly increase the amount of greenhouse gases around the globe. These practices also encourage companies to acquire new resources and materials, leading to an endless cycle of waste disposal. In addition to cutting down on waste, increasing recycling and reusing materials also contributes to a better economy. Instead of wasting old materials, recycling and reusing keeps the items in the system for longer periods. This reduces the need to purchase new materials and manage waste. + C40 Image via Patrick Tomasso

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Cities around the world lay the groundwork for a zero-waste future

Amidst a rising sea-level crisis, staying resilient in New Orleans

September 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Five lessons from the Big Easy.

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Amidst a rising sea-level crisis, staying resilient in New Orleans

Global movement will call out consumer brands most responsible for plastic pollution

September 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

The Story of Stuff Project is launching a global call to action in combating plastic pollution . The ambitious initiative plans to identify the most pervasive polluting companies while simultaneously cleaning up coastal and inland communities around the world. The plastic waste brand audit is the first of its kind and intends to underline responsibility and accountability at the very source of our world’s growing trash crisis. “Every year, thousands of people get together to clean up the waste that washes onto beaches around the world — but more plastic always reappears,” said Stiv Wilson, campaigns director for The Story Stuff Project. “To break the cycle of plastic pollution, we need to do things differently.” Related: Indonesia mobilizes 20,000 citizens to clean up plastic pollution Members and volunteers all over the world will join forces for a week-long series of events that will help clean our cities, towns, beaches , riverfronts and parks of invasive pollution. Wilson said, “This year, we’re not just cleaning up trash — we’re collecting data that will illuminate the most problematic brands in the environment and help us bring accountability to the companies that bear ultimate responsibility for the plastic pollution crisis.” The data collected from the 75 global locations where the clean-up audits are taking place will be compiled at local and global levels in order to identify which companies are polluting the most overall. The data will also show what areas face more challenges in reducing plastic consumption, information that will help with efficient disposal and recycling initiatives. “Corporations cannot greenwash their role out of the plastic pollution crisis and put the blame on people all the time,” said Von Hernandez, global coordinator of the environmental movement. “Our brand audits make it clear which companies are primarily responsible for the proliferation of throwaway plastic waste that’s defiling nature and killing our oceans . These events provide undeniable evidence of this truth.” Those who wish to lend a helping hand can learn more and join  here . The global results are set to be released in early October. + The Story of Stuff Project Image via Vaidehi Shah

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Global movement will call out consumer brands most responsible for plastic pollution

Financing a new, climate-friendly metropolis

September 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

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Will smart city projects with longer-term benefits weaken credit ratings?

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Financing a new, climate-friendly metropolis

Cities grab for the steering wheel on urban mobility issues

September 6, 2018 by  
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San Francisco’s decision to limit its scooter program signals the need for more attention to safety and equitable access.

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Cities grab for the steering wheel on urban mobility issues

The road to eliminating fluorinated chemicals in food packaging

September 6, 2018 by  
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Consumers, purchasers and scientists all want a safer alternative — and collaboration can get us there.

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The road to eliminating fluorinated chemicals in food packaging

Why are positive climate feedbacks so negative?

September 6, 2018 by  
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The “Hothouse Earth” report caught the public’s attention. But the coverage doesn’t tell the full story.

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Why are positive climate feedbacks so negative?

Can we integrate natural ecosystems in urban Asian spaces?

September 4, 2018 by  
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A Q&A with one of Singapore’s top architects on how Asian cities can be more environmentally friendly.

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Can we integrate natural ecosystems in urban Asian spaces?

The foreseeable future: How the next generation of mobility will affect cities

August 21, 2018 by  
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And the five things in our world that will change.

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The foreseeable future: How the next generation of mobility will affect cities

If charging scooters to use city streets makes sense, let’s charge cars proportionately

August 21, 2018 by  
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Can we make the “user pays” mythology sustainable?

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If charging scooters to use city streets makes sense, let’s charge cars proportionately

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