The Buitenhuis is a tiny house you can rent in the woods of the Netherlands

March 20, 2018 by  
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Chris Collaris Architects and the designers from Dutch Invertuals just unveiled a series of beautiful tiny house rentals designed to bring people closer to nature. Slated for construction in Droomparken—a series of holiday parks located across the Netherlands—the minimalist Buitenhuis cabins let guests enjoy a peaceful living space surrounded by scenic parkland. While these tiny cabins are just over 400 square feet, their strategic design makes that space feel much larger. A floor-to-ceiling glass door serves as the entrance and opens up to an almost entirely glazed wall, which creates a bright, airy interior and it provides stunning views of the surroundings. Related: Timber cabin on wheels lets you hit the open road in luxurious comfort Each home is two stories, with the living space on the ground floor and a sleeping loft on the second. The Buitenhuis cabins will be placed in Droomparken locations all across the Netherlands, but every tiny home will have a customized interior designed by Dutch Invertuals artists and based on the wishes and needs of the guests. The team at Dutch Invertuals designed the Buitenhuis to bring guests closer to the nature. By providing a window onto the parkland and an interior environment that mirrors the natural world, they hope to create a space where anyone can “retreat peacefully into nature, immersing [themselves] in personal rituals and feeling the Earth’s warmth – either in solitude or the company of loved ones.” The Buitenhuis design was unveiled at Dutch Design Week last year, and construction on the various Buitenhuis locations has already begun. Guests can choose from a variety of lodging options at the parks, such as campsites, luxury chalets, and bungalows—and now they can also enjoy the view from the comfort of a brilliant tiny home . + Dutch Invertuals + Chris Collaris Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Ronald Smits and Tim van de Velde via Dutch Invertuals  

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The Buitenhuis is a tiny house you can rent in the woods of the Netherlands

Blackened timber cottage with solar replaces a decayed brick home

November 27, 2017 by  
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An old and decayed brick house north of Amsterdam has transformed into a modern solar-powered dwelling that stands out from its neighbors, while respecting the local vernacular. Dutch firm Chris Collaris Architects completed the renovated home, cladding the facade and asymmetric gabled roof entirely with blackened pinewood to achieve a minimalist look. Passive solar principles guided the redesign, called House MM, which features black solar panels, high-density insulation, recycled materials, double-sealed windows, and an emphasis on natural lighting. House MM offers a rather limited floor area of 60 square meters, but the redesign of the interior gives it a much more spacious feeling than its brick predecessor. Tall ceilings, white walls, and an abundance of natural light create the illusion of space. Materials salvaged from the old house punctuate the interior, like the repurposed roof tiles and timber flooring seen in the garden and the brick walls found throughout the new home. Related: Rusting 1950s cargo ship transformed into a stunning modern floating home Despite its two-story appearance, the home includes three floors thanks to the addition of a mezzanine . “The roof lines were bound to restricted heights. By cantilevering the lower parts outside the main building volume, the upper level of the house increases,” wrote the architects. “A house with a high ceiling on every floor level and an extra attic is the result of this design feature. The extra win is a dry walk along the North facade while walking underneath the cantilevering roof part towards the entrance.” + Chris Collaris Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Tim van de Velde

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Blackened timber cottage with solar replaces a decayed brick home

BMW reveals bike ‘Hyperloop’ with elevated climate-controlled tubes

November 27, 2017 by  
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If you’ve ever tried to commute via bike, you know it can be fraught with danger: doors opening into the bike lane, pedestrians that jump out of nowhere, smog in your face and rain-slick streets. Now picture an elevated tube that lets cyclists move around the city in a safe, climate-controlled, enclosed bicycle superhighway . BMW wants to make it happen. Called the Vision E3 Way and designed in collaboration with Shanghai’s Tongji University , the idea is to create elevated tubes that connect to traffic hubs, shopping areas and underground stations, accessed by a ramp with barriers to control the amount of traffic in the tubes. Any zero-emissions, two-wheeled vehicle is welcome, and the climate would be controlled so you could comfortably commute all year-round. Related: Berlin plans at least 12 new bike superhighways Lighting and climate control would be powered by a rooftop array of solar panels . To encourage car owners to bike, rental stations would be placed throughout the network. The system could not only improve travel for cyclists, but the reduction in traffic congestion and air pollution could make life better for everyone. ‘It’s our Hyperloop ,’ said Markus Seidel, head of the BMW Technology Office China. Via Digital Trends

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BMW reveals bike ‘Hyperloop’ with elevated climate-controlled tubes

Dande-lier: Everyday objects transformed into stunning art in Singapore

November 27, 2017 by  
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Umbrellas and PVC pipes might not mean much to you, but in the right hands they can be turned into a stunning work of art. That’s what happened in Singapore earlier this year with the unveiling of Dande-lier, a temporary art installation and public space crafted from everyday objects. Design collective Colours: Collectively Ours used dozens of transparent umbrellas and PVC pipes to create an unusual dome-shaped pavilion that lit up at night like a glowing lantern. Created for Asia’s leading sustainable light art festival i Light Marina Bay in Singapore, Dande-lier was constructed to wow visitors at night, yet appeal to passersby during the day. Built for easy assembly, the pavilion was constructed from seven layers of triangular PVC pipe modules held together with metal pipe clamps. The resulting dome-shaped structure supported a canopy of tied translucent umbrellas . “Dande-lier conveys a feeling of weightlessness by using lightweight umbrellas, transforming an everyday object into a device to change the visitors’ perspective of their surroundings,” wrote the designers. “The umbrella spans across scales, individually as a chandelier, and collectively as a dandelion – hence, “Dande-lier”. Within, the view of the outside world is warped, transporting visitors into an alternate world, with a smart lighting system that responds dynamically to the visitors’ position in the sculpture.” Related: Mesmerizing Cube Pavillion Made from Mundane PVC Pipes While the installation provided shelter and respite from the sun during the day, at night it was transformed into a dynamic art installation illuminated by a smart lighting system. Motion sensors triggered changes in the colored lights and projected animations. + Colours: Collectively Ours Via ArchDaily Images © Oddinary Studios

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Dande-lier: Everyday objects transformed into stunning art in Singapore

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