Futuristic art center in China has detachable rooms that can bike around town

December 19, 2017 by  
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People’s Architecture Office just unveiled a futuristic cultural center in China that is equipped with detachable room that serve as “cultural satellites.” The incredible building – called the People’s Station – uses the flexible mini-structures to add extra space when necessary. When not in use, the mini-buildings can be collapsed and transported by bike to other locations. The architects used their own prefabricated system to manufacture the building, which took just three months to construct. Located in a quiet region of Yantai, the building’s design was created to attract visitors to the historic center of the city. Its funky angular volume is comprised of wide open entryways and various sections that seem to float off the ground. Related: China’s new futuristic library is unlike any we’ve seen before On the inside, the exhibition rooms are the first two floors are expansive, with high ceilings that are staggered up diagonally up to the second and third floors. Triangular glass panels flood the interior with natural light . On the top floor, visitors can enjoy a lounge area with a bookstore and a cinema. Throughout the building, there are various outdoor terraces that offer beautiful views of surrounding cityscape, as well as the ocean in the distance. + People’s Architecture Office Via Archdaily Photography courtesy PAO  

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Futuristic art center in China has detachable rooms that can bike around town

This tiny bamboo and steel shelter lights up like a lantern at night

March 31, 2017 by  
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Chinese studio C.DD took their love for their hometown of Foshan, China and created a tiny shelter that lights up like a lantern at night. Built for Guangzhou Design Week , the Origin of Everything is a perforated steel cube that features the Chinese character for “Hui,” which means “return to the origin.” C.DD’s art installation was developed for an event that asked designers to submit a small-scale representation of a city. Designers HE Xiao-Ping and LI Xing-Lin developed the cubic building to express their hometown’s compact, yet dynamic nature. Related: Handmade MPavilion will be the largest bamboo structure ever built in Australia A wall of bamboo rods froms a small rectangular zone in the center of the steel cube. Although at first glance the small 9-square-meter installation may look like a simple design, when looking at the cross section from above, the two independent squares created by the bamboo wall and exterior wall form the Chinese character “Hui.” Once on the inside, visitors are encouraged to follow the building’s narrow path, which the architects describe as “the road for the journey.” The path winds around the four walls of the cube, leading guests to walk the path alone while background music corresponds to flashing lights. On the exterior, the cube projects a series of maps of Foshan, China through perforated spaces on the steel facade. These holes provide the interior of the tiny space with ventilation and natural light . Via Sunshine PR Photography by OUYANG Yun

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This tiny bamboo and steel shelter lights up like a lantern at night

Amazing transformation of a decrepit cave into a beautiful modern home

February 7, 2017 by  
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Cave homes may conjure up thoughts of primitive living, but that’s not so for one lucky man who received the cave makeover of his dreams in China’s Shanxi Province. As part of a home renovation TV series called “Wow New Home,” architect Shi Yang of hyperSity Architects renovated a decrepit cave house into a stunning modern home. Despite the dramatic transformation, the new home still preserves elements of the traditional cave design. Read on to see the first episode of Wow New Home (in Chinese, starts at 4:00) and how a ramshackle cave was turned into an incredible new abode for five. Located in the Loess Plateau, the former house was one of many cave homes, called yaodong, typical of the area. These traditional dwellings have long been used for their energy-efficient properties; the earth naturally keeps the cave warm in winters and cool in summer. The house in question belonged to a family of five who lived in a series of dark and damp caves that were in a serious state of disrepair, with tilting and crumbling walls. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0u9ty_VyiGg The architects wanted to retain the traditional elements of the cave house while providing a modern refresh. To that end, they preserved the shape of the arched walls and mainly used rammed earth for construction. The interior layout of the home was redesigned in the style of a Chinese courtyard house to open the interior up to natural light and ventilation with space for bamboo gardens. The cave space to the north was mostly left intact, whereas the spaces to the south and west were torn down and reconstructed to make space for five small courtyards connected via a zigzag path. Related: More Than 30 Million People in China Live in Eco-Friendly Caves The renovated home matches the original building height but is strikingly contemporary in appearance. A mix of clay and sand from the nearby mountains were used for the reddish rammed earth walls, creating a visual departure from the original brownish gray earthern walls. The home is entered through the arched doorway that connects to the first courtyard. A path weaves through the new southern-oriented courtyards and cave rooms—which house a kitchen, bedrooms, storage room, dining room, and bathroom—and finally ends at the northernmost space in the rear that’s divided into the grandmother’s bedroom and living room. A skylight punctuates the northernmost space to let in extra light and ventilation. + Wow?? Via ArchDaily

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Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects unveils competition-winning design for the Shanghai Library

November 30, 2016 by  
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Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects just unveiled plans for the new Shanghai Library that are every bit as impressive as the city’s many futuristic buildings. Set to rise in Pudong overlooking the immense Century Park, the Shanghai Library will be light-filled with an eye-catching form. The design beat out proposals from competing firms including Kengo Kuma, David Chipperfield, and Dominique Perrault. The 125,000-square-meter Shanghai Library is shaped like an inverted triangle that appears to float over the landscape. The main library , clad in alternating strips of glazing and floor plate, is set above two glass pavilions housing a 1,200-seat performance venue, exhibition and events space, and dedicated children’s library. “We see the library as the focal point in a park, a central rock within a city-scale Chinese garden,” said Schmidt Hammer Lassen partner Chris Hardie. “One of the most compelling things about this project is its location within a parkland setting. You are in the heart of the world’s largest city, yet we have the opportunity to create a sanctuary for knowledge and media in the trees.” Related: Ennead Architects break ground on celestial Shanghai Planetarium Natural light fills the interior through the fritted glass bands that wrap around the building and a large skylight above the central atrium . Three staggered reading rooms are arranged around the atrium and feature low walls and open seating to promote transparency and spaciousness. Curved timber walls, bookshelves, and floors give the modern interior a sense of warmth. The Shanghai Library is expected to open in 2020. + Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Via ArchDaily

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Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects unveils competition-winning design for the Shanghai Library

Abandoned building is transformed into a vibrant kindergarten in a former Chinese “ghost city”

April 5, 2016 by  
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China finally bans ‘weird’ architecture

February 24, 2016 by  
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The facade of this Chinese art museum was inspired by the undulating curves of the Yellow River

August 11, 2015 by  
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HAO unveils cloud-inspired 3D movie museum for Tianjin

January 16, 2015 by  
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Designed as a cornerstone of a new media park in Tianjin , the proposed Bolong 3D Movie Museum & Mediatek overlooks a sprawling park and lake. To maintain direct sight lines and axial relationships between the park and the city, the architects divided the Mediatek programming into two glass-clad buildings. A public plaza that extends out onto the lake occupies the space between the two structures. Read the rest of HAO unveils cloud-inspired 3D movie museum for Tianjin Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D media , 3D Movie Museum , Bolong 3D Movie Museum & Mediatek , china , Chinese architecture , cloud-inspired architecture , exhibition space , experience zone , HAO , Holm Architecture Office , Jens Holm , Mediatek , public plaza , Tianjin

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Stufish’s Wanda Movie Theme Park is shaped like an enormous golden beehive in Wuhan

December 26, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Stufish’s Wanda Movie Theme Park is shaped like an enormous golden beehive in Wuhan Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Chinese architecture , Dalian Wanda , movie theme park , Stufish , Stufish Entertainment Architects , theme park , Wanda Movie Park , wuhan , Wuhan bells , Wuhan Movie Theme park

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Stufish’s Wanda Movie Theme Park is shaped like an enormous golden beehive in Wuhan

Zaha Hadid and Norman Foster Chosen to Design ‘Hawaii of China’ Project

October 22, 2014 by  
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Prolific starchitects Zaha Hadid and Norman Foster have been picked to jointly design two of three new resorts in what is being referred to as the ‘Hawaii of China.’ Slated to be built in the Chinese cities of Nanjing, Wuhan and Haikou, the designs will be part of a massive new development for the luxury hotel chain, Jumeirah Group. Read the rest of Zaha Hadid and Norman Foster Chosen to Design ‘Hawaii of China’ Project Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , Chinese architecture , Foster hotel design , Hadid hotels design , Hawaii of China , hotel architecture , hotel design , Jumeirah hotel Group , urban hotel , Zaha Hadid and Norman Foster

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