Why Aren’t My Hens Laying Eggs? Backyard Chicken Basics

September 8, 2020 by  
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Keeping a small flock of backyard chickens has numerous benefits. … The post Why Aren’t My Hens Laying Eggs? Backyard Chicken Basics appeared first on Earth 911.

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Why Aren’t My Hens Laying Eggs? Backyard Chicken Basics

Bond Pet Foods develops slaughter-free chicken for sustainable pet food

September 3, 2020 by  
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It’s an ethical conundrum vegetarian pet owners frequently face — isn’t it hypocritical to eschew meat consumption yourself while still supporting animal slaughter by purchasing pet food? Those days of having to choose Fluffy over a nameless abattoir victim may be coming to an end as Bond Pet Foods improves a new lab-grown chicken protein technology. The Boulder, Colorado-based biotech company has figured out how to crack the genetic code of a chicken and replicate it in a lab. In this case, Inga, a farm-dwelling heritage hen from Lindsborg, Kansas, was the blood donor. Food chemists combine the genetic code in a fermentation tank with food-grade yeast, and voilà, they’ve created something identical to animal meat. The fermentation process is similar to one commonly used to make enzymes for cheese. Related: 7 ways to be an eco-friendly pet owner “A new wave of responsible food production is emerging, working with the best that nature and science has to offer, and our team is leading this wave in Pet,” said Rich Kelleman, co-founder and CEO of Bond Pet Foods. “Our team’s continued developments are laying the foundation to bring high-value meat protein and nutrition to dogs and cats, while removing farm animals from the equation.” Don’t race to your local pet food store just yet. Bond aims to have the slaughter-free pet food on shelves by 2023 with support from seed investors. In the meantime, an early test of a dog treat made from the cultured chicken protein was a success with canine consumers. “Our initial tests with dog volunteers have been very promising, and its nutritionals, palatability and digestibility will only improve on our path to commercialization,” said Pernilla Audibert, co-founder and CTO of Bond Pet Foods. “The science team at Bond is also working on production of other cultured meat proteins made through a similar fermentation process. The successful chicken prototype is a demonstration of our technology’s potential to create a complete portfolio of animal proteins for pet consumption, and beyond.” + Bond Pet Foods Via VegNews Image via Bond Pet Foods

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Bond Pet Foods develops slaughter-free chicken for sustainable pet food

These solar-powered, mobile chicken coops help farmers prepare for harvest

December 11, 2019 by  
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Created specifically for the farmers working at the Ecology Center in San Juan Capistrano, this automated, solar-powered chicken coop , by Designers on Holiday , combines two important agricultural tasks: giving a chicken brood access to fresh grass and letting the animals fertilize new crops. The Chicken Caravan is a lightweight structure with wheels so that it can easily be transported by hand or tractor. Clad in a shimmering aluminum to reflect heat, the modern chicken coop was built with two large “wings” on either side to shade the interior, protect the hens from direct sunlight and provide natural air circulation. Related: The Moop — a modern, modular, prefab coop for design-savvy chickens The Chicken Caravan is also automated. Solar sensors on the doors automatically trigger the doors to open at the first light day and close after sunset. A singular solar panel keeps the batteries charged for easy maintenance of the system. The interior of the tiny structure is designed to keep the chickens as comfortable as possible. It can also be outfitted with various nest boxes and perches. A narrow ramp folds out for the chickens to come in or out, and there is also a portable fence to keep the hens inside and predators at bay. While some people might not see the need for such an innovative take on a basic, functional design, the Chicken Caravan’s mobility is a true game-changer for farmers . The mobile structure enables them to easily move their chickens to different areas so they can graze evenly over the pastures while preventing overgrazing. As the chickens harvest one section, they can also be used to fertilize other areas during the planting season. + Designers on Holiday Images via Designers on Holiday

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These solar-powered, mobile chicken coops help farmers prepare for harvest

These fish and meat options are the most environmentally costly

June 12, 2018 by  
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Farmed seafood, wild-caught fish , or livestock : which one is the most environmentally costly to produce? A University of Washington -led study probed that question by scrutinizing 148 life-cycle assessments for animal protein production. Lead author Ray Hilborn, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences professor, said in a statement , “If you’re an environmentalist, what you eat makes a difference. We found there are obvious good choices, and really obvious bad choices.” (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v3.0’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood Which food type is more environmentally costly to produce — livestock, farmed seafood, or wild-caught fish? New research from the University of Washington takes a comprehensive look at the environmental impacts of different types of animal protein production. Read more: http://www.washington.edu/news/2018/06/11/choice-matters-the-environmental-costs-of-producing-meat-seafood/ Posted by University of Washington News on Monday, June 11, 2018 Scientists drew on four metrics to compare environmental impacts of different animal proteins: greenhouse gas emissions , energy use, potential to add excess nutrients like fertilizer into the environment, and potential to emit substances that help cause  acid rain . They used 40 grams of protein — around the size of an average burger patty — as their standard amount . Related: Vegan diets deliver more environmental benefits than sustainable dairy or meat Industrial beef production and farmed catfish were the most environmentally costly in general, according to the university. Farmed mollusks such as scallops, oysters, or mussels and small wild-caught fish were the least environmentally costly. The university said capture fish choices like pollock, the cod family, and hake also have relatively low impact, and farmed salmon performed well. But there were differences across animal proteins — for example, the researchers said livestock production consumed less power than most seafood aquaculture as continual water circulation uses up electricity. Farmed tilapia, shrimp, and catfish used the most energy. Beef and catfish aquaculture generated around 20 times more greenhouse gases than chicken , farmed salmon, farmed mollusks, and small capture fisheries. “When compared to other studies of vegetarian and vegan diets, a selective diet of aquaculture and wild capture fisheries has a lower environmental impact than either of the plant-based diets,” according to the university. The journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment published the study this week. Four University of Washington scientists and one scientist from company Avalerion Capital contributed. + University of Washington + Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Images via

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These fish and meat options are the most environmentally costly

How can I reuse or recycle a wheelie bin?

November 18, 2016 by  
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Hi. Long time no blog! Sorry about that. This has annoyed me so much though that I feel compelled to post! Bradford Council has started charging for their previously free garden waste collection service. Only about a third of eligible household have signed up so the Council estimates there are around 55,000 “brown bins” no longer in use around the district. The Council estimates around half of those 55,000 will want to keep their wheelie bin as a spare or for other usage , and are starting to collect the other half. However, a local councillor doesn’t think that many people will want to keep them. Cllr Rebecca Poulsen, the local Tory spokesperson for waste, said: “I can’t see most people wanting to keep them for other storage purposes, really. “I can’t think there’s an awful lot to do with them.” Then you don’t have much imagination, do you Rebecca! On our allotments, old wheelie bins are prized possessions – a couple of holes drilled in the right places and they easily become sturdy water butts or compost bins . They’re also cheap, dry storage for plant pots, canes, plastic sheeting & netting, and woodchips. At home, I use old bins for storing my chicken feed and my in-laws use them, with an access hatch cut in the bottom, for storing firewood and multifuel . And they’re not just for grow-your-own hippies like me: I know other people who use them for storing kids garden toys, sports equipment and patio cushions out of season . And they’re just some of the easiest, most boring reuses! I’ve seen them cut in half to be used planters or wheelbarrows , and my old neighbours in Leeds even once transformed an old wheelie bin into a go-cart ! What other ideas are there for reusing wheelie bins? What would you do with one?

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How can I reuse or recycle a wheelie bin?

Yes, chicken diapers are actually a thing

February 13, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Yes, chicken diapers are actually a thing Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: chicken , chicken coop , chicken diaper , Chicken diapers , Chicken poo , chicken poop , chicken shit , chickens , coop , diaper , diapering , DIY chicken diapers , hen , hens , indoor chickens , pet chicken , pet chickens , pet hens

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Yes, chicken diapers are actually a thing

INFOGRAPHIC: The True Environmental Cost of Eating Meat

November 12, 2014 by  
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Do you know the real cost of a steak ? We’re not talking about the dollars that people shell out to buy one, but rather the environmental cost of creating it? From the water and grain needed to feed livestock to the  emissions created by huge herds of cattle, farming animals has a massive negative impact on the environment as a whole. Desertification, soil erosion, contaminated groundwater, and greenhouse gas emissions are just a few of the effects caused by raising animals for food . Check out the infographic below to learn more about just how much meat really costs in the long run, and why the planet would benefit a great deal if we all  chose parsnips over pot roast . Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: The True Environmental Cost of Eating Meat Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animals for food , beans , cattle , chicken , chickens , clean water , Climate Change , contaminated groundwater , contaminated water , desertification , eating animals , eating meat , erosion , food animals , gas emissions , greenhouse gas , greenhouse gases , infographic , land use , livestock , Meat , meats , pigs , pork , poultry , raising cattle , roast , soil erosion , steak , vegan , vegetables , vegetarian , vegetarian diet , water depletion , water issues , water use

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McDonald’s Japan Shuns Chinese Chicken Amidst Tainted Meat Scandal

July 29, 2014 by  
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China’s meat industry was recently dealt another blow as McDonald ’s Japan announced plans to stop importing Chinese chicken for sale in its restaurants. According to The Guardian , the decision is a result of the recent food safety scandal centered around Shanghai-based Husi Foods (the Chinese arm of U.S.-based OSI Group ), which is accused of repackaging and selling meat past its expiry date. In light of customer concerns around tainted meat from China, the company will now be sourcing mean for its eight chicken dishes from Thailand instead. Read the rest of McDonald’s Japan Shuns Chinese Chicken Amidst Tainted Meat Scandal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: chicken , china , chinese , husi , Japan , mcdonalds , mcnuggets , Meat , osi , scandal , tainted

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McDonald’s Japan Shuns Chinese Chicken Amidst Tainted Meat Scandal

Ton Matton’s Chicken Cabinet Produces Fresh Eggs Right in Your Kitchen

February 18, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Ton Matton’s Chicken Cabinet Produces Fresh Eggs Right in Your Kitchen Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , Chicken Cabinet , chicken coop , eco-friendly furniture , free range chicken , green interiors , green lifestyle , Recycled Materials , repurposed furniture , sustainable food , Ton Matton , urban chicken coop , Urban Farming        

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Ton Matton’s Chicken Cabinet Produces Fresh Eggs Right in Your Kitchen

Nike is Making Marty McFly’s Futuristic Self-Lacing Trainers Right on Time for 2015

February 18, 2014 by  
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Retail giant Nike is developing a version of Marty McFly’s futuristic self-lacing shoes from Back to the Future II . Formerly a fictional concept, the autonomous fastening system either loosens or tightens the upper laces without intervention from the wearer, a system that is particularly helpful for people with motoring disabilities. Nike’s lead designer Tinker Hatfield is reported to have said at a recent press conference that the futuristic shoes will arrive right on time for 2015, which is when McFly first wore them in the movie. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: autonomous fastening system , Back to the Future II , Design for Health , designs from movies made real , Ecotuerre , marty mcfly , movie characters , Nike , self-lacing shoes , shoes that tie themselves        

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Nike is Making Marty McFly’s Futuristic Self-Lacing Trainers Right on Time for 2015

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