The Hatchery announces new $30M food incubator for ‘global culinary capital’

July 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Hatchery announces new $30M food incubator for ‘global culinary capital’

A food incubator planned for Chicago’s East Garfield Park could provide much-needed economic growth for a struggling community. Nearly 40 percent of households there live below the poverty level, according to the Chicago Tribune . But the $30 million facility, being built by The Hatchery , could create 150 jobs in its first year, and in five years offer 900 jobs. The organization expects to break ground on the facility later this year. The Hatchery is a non-profit food business incubator started by three Chicago organizations: Accion Chicago , IFF , and Industrial Council of Nearwest Chicago . They offer financing, production space, and other resources for startup food businesses, and the new $30 million facility could help them assist even more people in the community. Related: Rooftop wheat fields elevate Chicago’s urban farming scene to exciting new heights 75 to 100 entrepreneurs will be able to start their businesses in The Hatchery’s planned space, which will be around 65,000 square feet. The City of Chicago is providing around $8 million for the venture, largely through tax increment financing, and large food companies like Kellogg Company and Conagra Foods have also pitched in undisclosed amounts. Shared kitchen spaces will help businesses get on their feet, and as they grow they’ll be able to rent one of the 56 private production spaces. Event spaces, meeting rooms, and food storage will also be found inside The Hatchery, where entrepreneurs will be able to receive coaching and training. Accion Chicago will relocate their headquarters to the new facility. Locals will be able to obtain job training or go to food classes there. The space will also host a neighborhood market. Mayor Rahm Emanuel praised the project in a press release, saying, “Chicago is the global culinary capital and The Hatchery will give our local entrepreneurs access to food and beverage companies that operate across the world.” Construction is slated to begin in October or November of this year, and the space could open in 2018. + The Hatchery Chicago Via the Chicago Tribune Images via The Hatchery Chicago Twitter and The Hatchery Chicago Facebook

Read more: 
The Hatchery announces new $30M food incubator for ‘global culinary capital’

Germany generated 35% of its electricity with renewables in first half of 2017

July 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Germany generated 35% of its electricity with renewables in first half of 2017

Good news! In the first half of 2017, Germany derived 35.1 percent of its electricity needs from renewable sources , according to the German Renewable Energy Federation (BEE). In a press release , the country’s trade body announced that Germany has successfully met its 2020 target for “share of gross electricity consumption.” It helped that from April 30 to May 1, the country generated 85 percent of its energy needs using renewable wind, solar, biomass and hydroelectric power. Germany has steadily increased its production of clean electricity over the past few years. In the first half of 2015, for instance, the country generated 32.7 percent of its energy needs from renewables , and 32.7 percent in the first half of 2016. Though the new record is positive news , progress in other sectors has been slow, specifically in the transportation and heating sectors. Said Haraold Uphoff, the acting director of BEE, “The power generation in Germany is progressing far too slowly.” Fortunately, the country is well on its way to producing 45 percent of its electricity from renewables by 2040, and 60 percent by 2050. The report details a jump in offshore wind energy in the first half of 2017. As Clean Technica reports, onshore wind energy grew “from 34.08 TWh in the first half of 2015, to 34.71 TWh a year later, but jumping to 39.75 TWh in the first half of this year. Offshore wind also jumped, from only 2.15 TWh in the first half of 2015 to 8.48 TWh this year.” Solar PV, as well, has seen incremental increases in growth. In 2015, output has increased from 19.50 Two in 2015 to 21.74 in the first half of 2017. Related: Germany, Denmark, and Belgium to boost offshore wind 5-fold within the next decade Time and again, Germany has proven its commitment to bettering the environment by taking action to meet goals outlined at the Paris Climate Change Conference . Their most recent effort includes signing a joint statement on climate cooperation with California earlier this month. The agreement was a “reaffirmation of joint ties” between the two to continue working on the persistent issue of global warming. Via Clean Technica Images via Pixabay

Read more here: 
Germany generated 35% of its electricity with renewables in first half of 2017

Houston superbug problem has been lurking for years, say researchers

May 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Houston superbug problem has been lurking for years, say researchers

Houston has a superbug problem, and it’s been lurking for years. A particularly virulent strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae , a bacteria that’s resistant to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, has a firm foothold on the Texan city, according to new research published in mBio , an online journal published by the American Society for Microbiology . Using genome sequencing, scientists from the Houston Methodist Research Institute found clone type 307 was responsible for more than one-third of resistant K. pneumoniae infections in their system. “Finding the otherwise uncommon strain in our city was a very surprising discovery,” James M. Musser, senior author of the study and chair of the Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at the Houston Methodist Research Institute and Houston Methodist Hospital, said in a statement. “Because K. pneumoniae is a common and important cause of human infections, we urgently need to identify potential vaccine targets or other new treatments, and develop new and rapid diagnostic techniques.” K. pneumoniae usually resides in the human intestines, where it doesn’t cause disease. When it migrates to other parts of the body, however, the bacteria can trigger infections such as pneumonia, meningitis, or blood septicity. Related: Student discovers a way to destroy superbug bacteria without antibiotics Musser’s team worked with researchers at Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago to analyze the genomes of 1,777 K. pneumoniae strains that caused infections in patients at Houston Methodist between September 2011 and May 2015. Clone type 307 emerged as the most abundant strain. But although the organism has been documented in regions of Europe, Africa, Asia, and South America, the study marks the first time it’s been singled out for causing such a broad number of infections in one city. Why this strain is so common in Houston is still a mystery, Musser said. “The faster we can successfully identify which antibiotics this strain is sensitive to, the faster a treating physician can target the appropriate therapy to these ill patients,” said S. Wesley Long, primary author of the study and associate director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Houston Methodist Hospital. “Our discoveries also give us the tools to begin to understand how the germ is spreading throughout the Houston area.” Earlier this year, an elderly woman in Nevada died from a K. pneumoniae infection after failing to respond to all 26 antibiotics used in the United States. There’s no approved vaccine for the superbug, but scientists are working on it. “Fortunately, the strain 307 identified in our study remains susceptible to certain antibiotics that can be used to successfully treat infected patients,” said Long. + American Society for Microbiology Via CBS News Photos by Unsplash

See more here: 
Houston superbug problem has been lurking for years, say researchers

The Obamas just revealed a first look at the new Presidential Center in Chicago

May 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The Obamas just revealed a first look at the new Presidential Center in Chicago

Former president and First Lady Barack and Michelle Obama just revealed plans for the Obama Presidential Center in Chicago. The park-like campus will feature three buildings including a museum, a forum and a library. The highlight of the design is the museum, which is clad in light-colored stone and stands as a sort of “lantern” for the campus. Designers are focusing on merging the best of the outdoors with the best of the indoors by including plenty of green spaces, green roofs , and public gardens. The campus, located in the neighborhood Jackson Park, will host exhibition space, education rooms, a restaurant, public gardens, and the Presidential library, which will house documents, photos and artifacts from Obama’s time in office. Related: Obama’s presidential library will be set in Chicago’s Jackson Park Pathways will criss-cross the campus, allowing visitors to walk from green spaces on the ground level to the green roofs of the two lower buildings. An outdoor plaza will connect everything together. The design was created by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien and will cost approximately $500 million to construct. Once completed, the buildings will comprise 200 – 225,000 square feet. Via The Chicago Tribune images via The Obama Foundation

Here is the original:
The Obamas just revealed a first look at the new Presidential Center in Chicago

Cadillac unveils their new CT6 Plug-in Hybrid – a large, green luxury sedan

May 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Cadillac unveils their new CT6 Plug-in Hybrid – a large, green luxury sedan

Cadillac is pushing a new green car strategy they hope will make a bigger impact than their ELR plug-in hybrid – a low-performing vehicle in terms of sales success. Rather than produce a standalone plug-in hybrid , like the ELR, Cadillac will release plug-in hybrid versions of its regular lineup, starting with the new 2017 CT6 Plug-in Hybrid. The 2017 CT6 plug-in hybrid is just now reaching showrooms, giving Cadillac a rival to other luxury sedan plug-ins, like the Mercedes-Benz S 550e, BMW 740e and Porsche Panamera E-Hybrid. The CT6 plug-in hybrid can travel up to 31 miles in electric mode, which is better than the embarrassing 12 mile EV range that the S550e manages to squeeze out of its battery. If you open the hood, you won’t see a V6 or large V8 engine, like many Cadillac loyalists are used to. Instead, the CT6 plug-in hybrid is powered by a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder engine and two-motor electric variable transmission. A large lithium-ion battery powers the electric part of the system from behind the backseat and takes up to 4.5 hours to fully recharge on a 240-volt outlet. Related: Honda steps up with new green car strategy In total, the system generates 335 horsepower and 432 lb-ft. of torque, which puts it directly in the middle of the CT6 lineup, with only the twin-turbocharged 3.0L V6 beating it. The CT6 plug-in hybrid can reach 60 mph in 5.2 seconds and has a 62 combined MPGe rating. Plus the 31-mile driving range is longer than almost every other plug-in hybrid on the market, with the exception of the Chevy Volt and BMW i3, but neither of those models are as luxurious or comfortable. On the road the CT6 tries to find the perfect balance between performance and efficiency. You can select between three driving modes: Tour, Sport and Hold. Tour is the standard setting, but if you want a more exciting driving experience, there’s the Sport mode with its more aggressive pedal mapping and steering response. The Hold mode allows the driver to save the EV range for later use, maybe in a city center, for example. There are also four selectable battery regen modes to recuperate as much energy as you want. The strongest setting almost allows for one pedal driving, which is something that makes the i3 so great to drive in traffic. What’s it like to drive the CT6 Plug-in Hybrid? Driving around Los Angeles in the CT6 Plug-in Hybrid, it’s easy to forget you’re driving an electrified Cadillac. The instantaneous torque makes acceleration a breeze and the 31-mile EV range is enough for short errands around town. With a 0-60 mph time of only 5.2 seconds, the CT6 Plug-in Hybrid can speed past many sports cars. Although it is fast, it’s still not a true sports sedan. If you’re looking for a sportier driving experience, you’ll probably want to check out the Panamera instead, but if you’re in the market for a large, luxurious sedan, without the fuel economy penalty, the CT6 Plug-in Hybrid is hard to beat. Pricing for the 2017 Cadillac CT6 Plug-in hybrid starts at $75,095. It only comes in one trim with standard features like, a head-up display, panoramic sunroof, rear seat infotainment system and the Enhanced Vision package. Images @Inhabitat and Cadillac + Cadillac

Here is the original: 
Cadillac unveils their new CT6 Plug-in Hybrid – a large, green luxury sedan

EPA workers openly fight against potential Pruitt confirmation

February 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on EPA workers openly fight against potential Pruitt confirmation

With Oklahoma attorney general Scott Pruitt ‘s installation as Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) head seeming more likely, current EPA employees have taken to their phones and the streets to resist his potential confirmation. They’ve contacted their senators and protested; one expert said he “can’t think of any other time when people in the bureaucracy have done this.” EPA scientists, policy experts, and environmental lawyers are openly opposing the confirmation of a man who’s sued the EPA 14 times – sometimes working with large fossil fuel companies – and can’t come up with even one EPA regulation he supports. The EPA’s union has sent emails and posted on social media exhorting members to take action. EPA employees in Chicago protested on the streets. Related: Scott Pruitt can’t name a single EPA regulation he approves of TechCrunch reported yesterday the EPA posted a snapshot of what their website looked like the day before Donald Trump’s inauguration after receiving numerous requests for the information. Two Democrat senators, West Virginia’s Joe Manchin III and North Dakota’s Heidi Heitkamp , said they’ll vote for Pruitt, and only one Republican, Maine’s Susan Collins , said she’ll oppose him. EPA lawyer Nicole Cantello, who’s also the Chicago area union leader, told The New York Times, “It seems like Trump and Pruitt want a complete reversal of what EPA has done. I don’t know if there’s any other agency that’s been so reviled. So it’s in our interests to do this.” Should Pruitt be confirmed, it would be difficult to fire those workers who opposed him due to Civil Service protections, meaning there could be a lot of internal dissension against actions Pruitt aims to take, like dismantling the Clean Power Plan . Former EPA employee Judith Enck told The New York Times, “EPA staff are pretty careful. They’re risk-averse. If people are saying and doing things like this, it’s because they’re really concerned.” Via The New York Times Images via Lorie Shaull on Flickr and Gage Skidmore on Flickr

Go here to read the rest:
EPA workers openly fight against potential Pruitt confirmation

Warming Huts 2017 winning designs are inspired by beaches, lanterns, and open borders

December 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Warming Huts 2017 winning designs are inspired by beaches, lanterns, and open borders

Warming Huts , an ” Art + Architecture Competition ” whose entrants design huts fit for the cold Winnipeg winters, have revealed their 2017 winners. Three winning teams designed the 2017 huts, which include a lantern-like hut, an ice block cabin and an “open border” hut. This year’s five winning huts are creative out-of-the-box designs that were inspired by history, tropical beaches and even  politics . Warming Huts invited Anish Kapoor to design a hut this year, and he envisioned “Stackhouse,” a geometric hut to be made wholly of ice blocks. They also selected the design of Nelson McIntyre Collegiate student Sean Kohli “On The Rails,” which was inspired by local history of rail transportation. Related: ROPE Pavilion by KNE Studio Is An Elegant Woven Warming Shelter In Canada Warming Huts also selected three winners. Team 888 of Chicago designed the winning “Greetings From Bubble Beach,” a geodesic dome retreat reminiscent of “an inverse snow globe,” according to the project description . Set on a wooden base, the dome will create a warm respite allowing visitors to step into summer. Team 888 plans to equip the dome with deck chairs, a palm tree, and a “sand-like ground layer.” The hut “Ice Lantern” is another winner. Designed by Lisa Tondino, Alexandra Bolen, Mathew Rodrigues, and Drew Klassen of Novia Scotia, Canada, designers say Ice Lantern is based on primitive hut archetypes. The lantern portion will hover over the snow, held in place by an “iglu snow-mound structure.” That structure will include wooden bench seating, offering warmth through natural insulation from the snow. The third winning design is “Open Border” from Joyce de Grauw and Paul van den Berg of the Netherlands. The two designers created a hut that looks like a red wall crossing an ice skating trail in the area. But skaters can shelter in the wall and cross through it at any point along the installation. In January 2017, the winners will travel to Winnipeg, Canada to construct the huts they designed. + Warming Huts Via Bustler Images via Warming Huts

See more here:
Warming Huts 2017 winning designs are inspired by beaches, lanterns, and open borders

Astronomers just calculated when a day on Earth will be 25 hours long

December 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Astronomers just calculated when a day on Earth will be 25 hours long

Many jokes are made about creating just one more hour in the day, but that will eventually become a reality. After a review of celestial data spanning 27 centuries, a team of astronomers has determined that Earth’s orbit slows almost two milliseconds every 100 years . If the slowdown continues—and it’s expected to—Earth will eventually experience an extra hour each day. Some careful math helped researchers estimate how long it might take for the orbit to slow enough to create a whole new hour. Collecting ancient documentation of celestial events , such as eclipses, was no small task. Researchers at Durham University and the UK’s Nautical Almanac Office collated data on events from 720BC to 2015, a span of 2,735 years. The oldest records came from Babylonian clay tablets written in cuneiform, with more added from ancient Greek texts, and scripts from China, medieval Europe, and the Arab region. Related: Newly discovered ‘ghost galaxy’ full of dark matter is as big as the Milky Way Leslie Morrison is an astronomer and co-author of the study, which was just published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society. Morrison and his team evaluated nearly 3,000 celestial records in order to arrive at the estimated orbital slowing rate of 2ms per century. Although it’s been long known that the Earth’s orbit is gradually slowing, this is the first study to produce an estimated rate of that change. The study results also discuss some of the factors in the Earth’s orbital slowdown, including the tidal braking effect caused by the moon’s gravity, changes in the world’s sea levels, and the electromagnetic forces between Earth’s core and its rocky mantle. Don’t start making plans for how to spend your extra hour. According to the study results, it will be another two million centuries before Earth’s day lengthens to 25 hours. Via The Guardian Images via NASA ( 1 , 2 )

The rest is here: 
Astronomers just calculated when a day on Earth will be 25 hours long

Labyrinthine resort in Bangladesh lets nature take over

December 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Labyrinthine resort in Bangladesh lets nature take over

Nestled among the green hills of a tea plantation in northern Bangladesh , Dusai Resort & Spa was modeled after the area’s traditional villages. VITTI Sthapati Brindo used a hybrid construction system of traditional tea estate bungalows and standardized concrete structures, as well as local technology and materials, to create the labyrinthine development, which is dominated by an explosion of vegetation. Photo by Hasan Saifuddin Chandan The resort comprises a residential complex, dining, a swimming pool , a spa, a conference room, and an indoor and outdoor gaming facility. The individual cottages of the residential complex are arranged in an array around a semi-private courtyard, while the deluxe cottages for couples are arranged in flocks in more private areas. The layout of the entire site resembles a labyrinth, with a curving path, internal roads and walkways leading visitors from the reception area to their cottages. The linear routes connect the public, semi-private and private zones consecutively. Related: Jean-Michel Cousteau Eco Resort Showcases Traditional Building Photo by Hasan Saifuddin Chandan The design lets nature dominate built space. From the very beginning, the architects made a conscious effort to preserve existing open space, trees and the site’s natural topography. They used local craftsmanship and traditional construction techniques for a more sustainable approach to building on a slope. Bungalows were built on stilts, which allowed drainage to remain uninterrupted and dense vegetation untouched. The result demonstrates that the good life doesn’t have to be destructive. + VITTI Sthapati Brindo Ltd. Via v2com Lead photo by Hasan Saifuddin Chandan

Go here to read the rest: 
Labyrinthine resort in Bangladesh lets nature take over

Majority of Americans support Paris climate deal as Trump reconsiders pulling out

November 25, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Majority of Americans support Paris climate deal as Trump reconsiders pulling out

A new survey shows strong bipartisan support in the US for staying in the Paris climate agreement that formally commits its 193 signatories to reducing greenhouse gas emissions to avert dangerous climate change. The Chicago Council on Global Affairs poll of 2,061 Americans finds that 71 percent agree that the US should participate in the pact, including a majority of Republicans (57 percent), Democrats (87 percent) and Independents (68 percent). President-elect Donald Trump has previously stated that he believes climate change is a hoax and that he intends to pull the US out of the Paris climate deal as soon as he takes office. However, in a potentially major reversal if he holds to it, Trump told New York Times reporters during a visit to the Midtown Manhattan newsroom that human activity is connected to climate change and that he would keep an open mind on the landmark climate accord. Related: Al Gore reaches out to work with Donald Trump on climate change On the link between human activities and climate change, Trump said that “I think there is some connectivity. Some, something. It depends on how much.” And when pressed on the Paris climate deal, Trump said that “I’m looking at it very closely. I have an open mind to it.” While this is a stunning reversal on his previous positions regarding man-made global warming, it remains to be seen whether Trump will change his policies that currently advocate for more oil, coal and natural gas at a time when many climate experts are warning that we have no carbon budget left and that we must keep remaining hydrocarbon reserves in the ground to sustain a livable climate. Trump’s new stance accepting human-induced climate change also goes against the climate deniers and fossil fuel industry insiders placed on his transition team and cabinet. The survey’s lead author Dina Smeltz, a senior fellow on public opinion and foreign policy at the Chicago Council, told The Washington Post that “an increasing percentage of Republicans now say that some gradual action should be taken” to address climate change concerns and that the American public “has been growing in their support for mitigating climate change.” + Chicago Council survey: Growing support in US for some climate action Via The Washington Post Lead image via Wikimedia , others via Wikimedia

Read more here: 
Majority of Americans support Paris climate deal as Trump reconsiders pulling out

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2832 access attempts in the last 7 days.