C&A debuts world’s first Cradle to Cradle Certified Gold T-shirts

May 12, 2017 by  
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A chain of clothing stories in Belgium has launched the world’s first Cradle to Cradle Certified Gold T-shirts . Available in two styles for women in up to 17 different colors, C&A’s tees mark the company’s first foray into apparel for the so-called “circular economy,” where products are designed to be reused or recycled rather than thrown away. The shirts, which comprise 100 percent organic cotton , represent what C&A calls a “positive ecological and social level never before seen for a fashion garment.” California’s Cradle to Cradle Product Innovation Institute , which manages the certification mark, defines C2C Certified products as items that have been optimized for human and environmental health, material reutilization, renewable energy use, carbon management, water stewardship, and social justice. Ratings are based on four levels: Basic, Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. Related: First Cradle to Cradle Platinum certified product is reclaimed Bark House shingle C&A worked with McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry , the recently formed Fashion for Good initiative, and two India-based factories to develop the tees based on Cradle to Cradle Certified criteria. Both Cotton Blossom and Pratibha Syntex, C&A said, needed minimal improvement in those areas. “In nature, the ‘waste’ of one system becomes food for another,” Jay Bolus, president of certification services at MBDC, said in a statement. “The two new T-shirts illustrate the possibility by which we can transform what is currently a take-make-waste industry to one that is regenerative and closed loop to progress us toward a positive future. We worked closely with Cotton Blossom and Pratibha Syntex and throughout their supply chains to ensure the resulting apparel is not only attractive, accessible and affordable—but also a positive design.” C&A’s shirts, which will appear in stores in June, use only materials that have been deemed safe for cycling as biological nutrients, making them safe enough to compost at home at the end of their lives. Two additional styles, one for women and another for men, will debut in Brazil and Mexico in September. Related: Freitag announces that their 100% compostable denim is about to hit shelves “We are very proud to introduce our first Gold level Cradle to Cradle Certified T-shirts,” said You Nguyen, director of brands, womenswear collections, at C&A. “Taking inspiration from nature, these shirts were designed with their next life in mind. This means they can be reused recycled—or you can literally throw your shirts onto the compost pile.” Nguyen added, “We believe in fashion with a positive impact and are excited to provide our customers with stylish products and render sustainable fashion available at great value.” + C&A

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C&A debuts world’s first Cradle to Cradle Certified Gold T-shirts

Duke University researchers use light to convert carbon dioxide to fuel

February 24, 2017 by  
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What if the carbon dioxide building up in our atmosphere could be put to good use as fuel ? For years chemists have chased a catalyst that could aid the reaction converting carbon dioxide to methane , a building block for many fuels – and now Duke University scientists have found just such a catalyst in tiny rhodium nanoparticles . Duke University researchers converted carbon dioxide into methane with the help of rhodium nanoparticles, which harness ultraviolet light’s energy to catalyze carbon dioxide’s conversion into methane. Rhodium is one of Earth’s rarest elements, but according to Duke University it plays a key role in our daily lives by speeding up reactions in industrial processes like making detergent or drugs. Rhodium also helps break down toxic pollutants in our cars’ catalytic converters. Related: Scientists create a new kind of matter called time crystals The fact that the scientists employed light to power the reaction is important. When graduate student Xiao Zhang tried heating up the nanoparticles to 300 degrees Celsius, the reaction did produce methane but also produced an equal amount of poisonous carbon monoxide . But when he instead used a high-powered ultraviolet LED lamp, the reaction yielded almost entirely methane. Jie Liu, chemistry professor and paper co-author, said in a statement, “The fact that you can use light to influence a specific reaction pathway is very exciting. This discovery will really advance the understanding of catalysis.” The scientists now hope to find a way to employ natural sunlight in the reaction, which Duke University says would be “a potential boon to alternative energy .” The journal Nature Communications published the research of seven scientists from Duke University’s chemistry and physics departments online this week. Via Duke University Images via Chad Scales/Duke University and Xiao Zhang/Duke University

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Duke University researchers use light to convert carbon dioxide to fuel

New Maps Show the Price World Oceans Pay for Sucking Up Our CO2

November 12, 2014 by  
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We should be thankful for our oceans. In addition to providing us with food and recreation and a host of other services, they absorb up to one quarter of our carbon dioxide emissions. As a result, climate change is not nearly as bad as it might be. But they, and the marine creatures that live in them, also pay a tremendous price for this inadvertent favor: acidification . Motherboard Vice reports that our oceans are 30 percent more acidic today than they were 200 years ago, and now for the first time, we know which oceans are acidifying at a faster rate than others. Tara Takahashi from Columbia University and his team used four decades of data to map how acidity levels vary across the world’s oceans; their research appeared in the August issue of the journal Marine Chemistry . Read the rest of New Maps Show the Price World Oceans Pay for Sucking Up Our CO2 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , CO2 emissions , Columbia University , Environment , global warming , maps , Marine Chemistry , News , ocean acidification , ocean acidification maps , ocean warming , Taro Takahashi

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New Maps Show the Price World Oceans Pay for Sucking Up Our CO2

Researchers Discover How Nature Makes Powerful Antibiotics That Defy Resistance

October 27, 2014 by  
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A team of researchers from the University of Illinois have made a breakthrough in understanding how a powerful antibiotic agent is made in nature. By solving the decades-old mystery of how the naturally occurring antibiotic nisin is given its structure by the action of enzymes, the team have opened the way to the discovery, production and study of dozens of similar compounds. This type of compound could be useful in fighting food-borne diseases or dangerous microbial infections, and as an added bonus, the compounds also have properties that make it difficult for pathogens to develop resistance to them. Read the rest of Researchers Discover How Nature Makes Powerful Antibiotics That Defy Resistance Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: antibiotic resistance , antibiotics , biochemistry , chemistry , dehydratase , nisin , peptides , Satish K. Nair , superbugs , university of illinois , Wilfred van der Donk

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Researchers Discover How Nature Makes Powerful Antibiotics That Defy Resistance

Former Google Maps Genius to Build the World’s Largest Plant Library

August 20, 2014 by  
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San Francisco-based startup Hampton Creek already has a couple of wins under its belt with its egg-free mayonnaise and dairy-free cookies. But its recent announcement that Dan Zigmond, formerly lead data scientist for Google Maps, will head the data resources for the company’s planned world’s largest plant library reveals just how grand its ambitions are. The purpose of the library? To identify and catalog plant characteristics in the quest to find more sustainable, animal-free alternatives to common foodstuffs . Read the rest of Former Google Maps Genius to Build the World’s Largest Plant Library Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animal free , chemistry , cruelty-free foods , Dan Zigmond , database , food science , Hampton Creek , Lee Chae , non-GMO foods , vegan foods , vegetarian , world’s largest plant library

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Former Google Maps Genius to Build the World’s Largest Plant Library

?Cheap, Efficient Organic Flow Battery Materials

January 13, 2014 by  
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The science of power storage has a new variety of options and new materials to investigate thanks to some recent developments in the chemistry of materials used in flow batteries. Until now, flow batteries have largely relied on metallic compounds for the active chemicals they use. But new materials have been found that are cheaper and more effective than the chemicals which have been most used in flow batteries until now. The research undertaken by scientists at Harvard University has identified a range of organic compounds known as quinones , which are have the potential to be especially useful for flow batteries. Initial research indicates they are inexpensive and efficient materials well suited for use in power storage. A recently published paper in the journal Nature discusses the use of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonic acid (AQDS), a compound found in rhubarb, in a flow battery. Large-scale energy storage is an area where flow batteries can excel, because the equipment needed to build a large energy storage system is basic, industrial gear, rather than highly specialized equipment. To increase storage capacity, a flow battery just needs a couple of larger storage tanks. The AQDS materials are naturally abundant and very stable. They are potentially safer than metal-based flow batteries because the materials are “less likely to react violently if they accidentally come in contact with each other.” When used in a flow battery, they show very good cycle efficiency and “[represent] a new and promising direction for realizing massive electrical energy storage at greatly reduced cost.” The chemicals needed to store a kilowatt-hour of energy would cost $27, which is roughly one-third the cost of other systems. via: Business Insider

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?Cheap, Efficient Organic Flow Battery Materials

LEGO Introduces Female Scientist in Their Minifigures Series 11 Collection

September 8, 2013 by  
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Image via Maia Weinstoc k. There are some new Minifigures on the LEGO block, and they love to study science. While this may not seem like an unusual departure from the toy’s regular line of explorers, academics, and swashbucklers, the gender of this tiny person sets them apart. The Minifigures Series 11 collection features a female chemist, complete with a set of beakers and lab coat. Even more exciting, three new learned ladies may soon be on their way in a project proposed by Alatariel . READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Alatariel , chemistry , female , Inhabitots , lego , minifigure , minifigure 11 series , scientist , toys        

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LEGO Introduces Female Scientist in Their Minifigures Series 11 Collection

Danish Researchers Develop More Climate Friendly Fuel Cells for Hydrogen Vehicles

July 25, 2013 by  
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When it comes to hydrogen fuel cells , they are worth their weight in platinum. A team of researchers at the Department of Chemistry at the University of Copehagen have developed technology that allows the cells to produce as much electricity as current counterparts without having to use as much pricey platinum. Better for the environment than internal combustion engines, fuel cells are efficient, and they do not emit smog or CO2. Read the rest of Danish Researchers Develop More Climate Friendly Fuel Cells for Hydrogen Vehicles Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ampere , catalyst , CO2 , emissions , GOLD , hydrogen fuel cell , max planck institute for iron research , nature materials , oxygen , platinum , russia , South Africa , technical university munchen , troy ounce , university of copenhagen        

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Danish Researchers Develop More Climate Friendly Fuel Cells for Hydrogen Vehicles

Scientists Develop a Long-Lasting and Environmentally Friendly Battery Made from Wood

July 25, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock When searching for inspiration to create an environmentally friendly battery, University of Maryland researchers Liangbing Hu, Teng Li and their team looked to the trees. Their invention uses a tiny sliver of wood from yellow pine trees coated with tin to create a device that is a thousand times thinner than a piece of paper. Instead of lithium, they chose sodium which even though it does not store energy as efficiently, costs far less and is a much more common material. While you may not end up seeing this battery in a mobile device, it could be an ideal choice for large-scale facilities such as power plants. Read the rest of Scientists Develop a Long-Lasting and Environmentally Friendly Battery Made from Wood Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: battery , biomimicry , hongli zhu , lianghing hu , lithium , nanobattery , sodium , teng li , tin , University of Maryland , Wood , wood fiber , yellow pine        

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Scientists Develop a Long-Lasting and Environmentally Friendly Battery Made from Wood

Washington Steps Up with a 42-Point Plan to Battle Ocean Acidification

November 28, 2012 by  
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The acidification of the oceans has been increasing at an alarming rate as carbon dioxide released into the air alters the chemistry of the oceans. But Washington State isn’t taking it lying down. In order to combat acidification, which impacts the state’s vital shellfish industry, the state is launching a 3.3-million dollar plan. Read the rest of Washington Steps Up with a 42-Point Plan to Battle Ocean Acidification Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon dioxide in the oceans , combating global warming , combating ocean acidification , ocean acidification , shellfish issues , Washing State Oceans , Washington State shellfish industry

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