Charred wood-clad Sleeve House is a home within a home

November 2, 2017 by  
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The traditional barn gets a brilliant reinterpretation in the modern charred wood-clad Sleeve House. Two elongated volumes – a smaller one sleeved into a larger – comprise this timber house located on an open rolling hillside in New York state. Architecture firm actual / office  used Shou Sugi Ban to give the home a sustainable, low-maintenance exterior that complements the surrounding landscape. The Sleeve House sits on a sloping terrain around two hours north of New York City in a rural area of the Hudson Valley. Its two volumes–one sleeved into the other– create three different types of spaces both on the inside and the outside of the house. The space between the inner and outdoor volumes accommodates common areas, including an entry gallery, a narrow vertical slot for the stairs, and a spacious living space with a sloping glass wall . Walking into the smaller volume from the main one creates an experience of entering a different universe. Related: This charred wood cabin can be rearranged in an infinite number of ways The smaller volume contains private areas and a study. These spaces feature warm, soft finishes which contrast the rough materials– exposed concrete and charred wood – that dominate the rest of the interior as well as the exterior. The house is clad in Shou Sugi Ban (charred wood) that makes the house stand out while complementing its surroundings and gives it depth, pattern and texture. Large glass surfaces offer expansive views of the landscape. + actual / office Via Contemporist Photos by Michael Moran , lead image via  Deborah DeGraffenreid

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Charred wood-clad Sleeve House is a home within a home

Ancient Japanese technique dresses up this renovated home in upstate New York

October 21, 2016 by  
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The original house was designed by architect John Bloodgood in the 1970’s. It was clad in T-111 siding and had no insulation . It also needed better mechanical systems, as well as a new roof and windows. The owner commissioned AlexAllen Studio to give the structure a makeover and upgrade it with low-maintenance materials. Related: Prefab Dutch ‘Shou Sugi Ban’ House Features a Low-Maintenance Charred Timber Facade The architects proposed Shou-Sugi Ban wood siding in combination with a more cost effective fiber cement panel for the facade. The wooden siding is manufactured using an ancient Japanese technique that preserves wood by charring its surface . Bug and rot resistant, the material weathers well over time and requires little maintenance. The team also introduced a layer of insulation under the siding, replaced the existing openings with triple-glazed windows, and added sun screens to protect the interior from the elements. + AlexAllen Studio Via uncrate Photos by Alan Tansey

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Ancient Japanese technique dresses up this renovated home in upstate New York

14 amazing timber structures explore the future of wood as a building material

August 30, 2016 by  
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Fire Nest references the role fireplaces once played in building communities. As a place around which people gather, cook and share stories, the Fire Nest aims to expand and revive the role of fireplaces by accommodating different functions. Another project called Migrant Hous(ing) by Urban Think-Tank proposes a sprawling, informal wooden structure as a housing strategy for migrants. Community-driven and open to incremental upgrading, the prefabricated structure can be easily assembled and transported to different locations. Related: Hello Wood Unveils Epic Butterfly House Pavilion for the Budapest Spring Festival FORA ‘s The Bathhouse inverts the contemporary separation between privacy and exposure, and restores the public function of washing in the realm of the collective. Located at the heart of the village, the bathhouse functions as a space where participants can relax after a day spent building their projects. Play with Fire references the traditional Japanese technique of charring wood to extend its lifespan. The elongated structure is one of the camp’s first buildings and aims to contribute to its longevity. Inventory functions as a membrane where travelers can leave their gadgets and pass through a different world. The light, box-shaped object is reminiscent of the inventory in Moonrise Kingdom of Wes Anderson. Installed next to it is The Thread by Kosmos Architects , a “new kind of wall” that attracts instead of separating. The structure is built in layers according to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and functions as a rudimentary shelter . The Parliament, another gathering space which fosters inclusivity and diversity, rethinks the archetypal outdoor amphitheater space. Here people can share food, welcome visitors, and discuss ideas. Related: Hello Wood’s massive Christmas trees will be dismantled and donated after the holidays “Project Village 2016 is the beginning of a new era for Hello Wood. We are building a rural campus that will be open throughout the year to welcome architects, artists, social scientists, and students. In our brief we asked for projects that address actual needs of the community, from the most mundane and pragmatic ones to the utmost spiritual. We were happy to see responses to these basic functions such as a sanctuary, a storage or a public kitchen, among others,” says Peter Pozsar, one of the founders of Hello Wood. + Hello Wood Lead photo by Photo by Gábor Somosk?i

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14 amazing timber structures explore the future of wood as a building material

Sett Studio’s Modern Live Oak Residences in Austin Show that Green Design Should be Standard

October 20, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Sett Studio’s Modern Live Oak Residences in Austin Show that Green Design Should be Standard Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , 900 live oak , 902 live oak , 902 w live oak , austin , austin eco home , charred wood , eco design , eco home , energy efficient home , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green home , sett studio , shou sugi ban , Sustainable Building , sustainable design

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Sett Studio’s Modern Live Oak Residences in Austin Show that Green Design Should be Standard

Researchers Take an Up-Close and Personal Look at What Pollution Does to the Body

October 20, 2014 by  
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Air pollution is one of those things that we know is awful for our bodies, but it can be hard to see the actual impact. So even though about 3.7 million people died prematurely from air pollution in 2012 alone, it’s easy to forget day-to-day just how deadly that smoggy air can be. Scientists at the University of Melbourne are studying air pollution, however, and taking a close-up look to show people just how those airborne particles are harming our bodies. Read the rest of Researchers Take an Up-Close and Personal Look at What Pollution Does to the Body Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: air pollution , air pollution health , air pollution policy , environmental pollution , free radicals , lung damage air pollution , nitrogen oxide , nitrogen oxide pollution , ozone , ozone pollution , pollution and respiratory disease , pollution research , smog

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Researchers Take an Up-Close and Personal Look at What Pollution Does to the Body

Bergen Safe House is a Temporary Structure Protected From Fire by a Charred Exterior

July 23, 2012 by  
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The Bergen Safe House was built in just 4 days as part of the Bergen International Wood Festival in Norway. Created by Dutch architects Max Rink and Simon de Jong and designer Rachel Griffin , the temporary structure is made from pine wood with a charred exterior to protect it from the elements. Inside, the fire-proof structure features movable platforms that can accommodate a variety of activities and can fit up to 28 people. Read the rest of Bergen Safe House is a Temporary Structure Protected From Fire by a Charred Exterior Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , Bergen , bergen international wood festival , bergen safe house , charred exterior , charred wood , eco design , fire-proof , fire-proof design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , max rink , norway , pavilion , Rachel Griffin , shou sugi ban , simon de jong , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , temporary pavilion , temporary structure , wooden structure

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Bergen Safe House is a Temporary Structure Protected From Fire by a Charred Exterior

Yun-Woo Choi Makes Extraordinary 3-D Sculptures Out of Recycled Magazines

July 23, 2012 by  
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South Korean artist Yun-Woo Choi creates mind-bending three-dimensional sculptures out of rolled-up recycled magazines . Captivated by theoretical physics and the notion of multiple dimensions (14 in all, according to scientists), Choi uses his art to explore the possibility that emotions, dreams and even god occupy some kind of invisible space. And he does all this without creating a pile of waste. Read the rest of Yun-Woo Choi Makes Extraordinary 3-D Sculptures Out of Recycled Magazines Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3 d , eco design , eco-art , green design , NYC , physics , recycled art , Recycled Materials , science , sculpture , south korea , sustainable art , sustainable design , Yun-Woo Choi

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Yun-Woo Choi Makes Extraordinary 3-D Sculptures Out of Recycled Magazines

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