A historic farmhouse is transformed into a modern home with a green roof

September 10, 2018 by  
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The building elements of a century-old farmhouse in Park City, Utah have been salvaged and transformed into a beautiful and contemporary new residence that pays homage to its historic rural past. Located on a nearly 80-year-old forested plot of spruce and cottonwood trees, the former farmhouse was beyond repair and needed to be demolished. Wanting to save the spirit of the structure, the owners turned to Salt Lake City- and Los Angeles-based design studio Sparano + Mooney Architecture to design a modern abode that would occupy the former building’s footprint and make use of as many recycled materials as possible. Named the Reddish Residence, the two-story home spreads out over 4,000 square feet. A natural materials palette of timber and stone tie the building to the landscape, while elements like recycled wood and metal reference the farmhouse vernacular. Inspired by the petrified wood — fossilized remains of trees or plants that turn into stone — found on the site, the architects used building materials that also visually morph over time. Consequently, the Reddish Residence exterior includes weathering steel and reclaimed cedar that’s treated with the Shou Sugi Ban  technique for a charred, blackened finish. Further tying the modern house into its surroundings are the abundance of landscaping, a green roof atop the charred cedar-clad addition and large full-height glazing. In contrast to the mostly muted exterior palette, the interior is full of colors, patterns and textures set on a backdrop of mainly white-painted walls and concrete floors. The existing metal silo was preserved and renovated to house the home office. The rooftop is also topped with solar panels. Related: Minimalism adds a modern twist to this traditional farmhouse “This architecture takes a contemporary approach to form,” the architects said. “The house responds to the site by acting as a moderator between interior spaces and the landscape. Arcades, overhangs, courtyards and site walls articulate that relationship. An arcade marked by a gesture to the street bisects an entry courtyard. This path forms a strong entry sequence that welcomes and guides the visitor through a choreographed threshold and provides a series of expanding glimpses of the site. The design offers both ideal southern orientation and full access to the mountain and meadow views.” + Sparano + Mooney Architecture Images by Scot Zimmerman

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A historic farmhouse is transformed into a modern home with a green roof

Burnt wood-clad tiny home manages to pack a ton of luxury into just 240 square feet

September 8, 2016 by  
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New Frontier Tiny Homes is owned and operated by David Latimer, Zac Thomas, and Eddie Latimer, who seek to develop tiny houses on wheels for people to live in a more sensible way. They hope to show people that they can live economically, socially and environmentally-friendly without compromising on aesthetics. Their latest creation, the Alpha Tiny House, combines their expert construction skills with a Japanese technique for keeping fire, bacteria and fungi naturally at bay called Shou Sugi Ban.  This wood burning technique was applied to leftover cedar wood from a barn, while its cozy interiors make for a lovely contrast inside. Related: Towable Riverside tiny house packs every conventional amenity into 246 square feet   The interiors are where this home shines: filled with storage, transformable furniture, vintage and classic design pieces, as well as an eight-person dining table, it is surpisingly large. A hidden  loft bedroom also fits in the space, and a complete kitchen with the latest appliances shows living outdoors doesn’t always mean roughing it. The pop-up home is completed by a Jacuzzi tub, a modern shower, and composting toilet for a touch of modern-rustic. + New Frontier Tiny Homes Via My Modern Met

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Burnt wood-clad tiny home manages to pack a ton of luxury into just 240 square feet

Handcrafted timber pavilion celebrates British and Japanese craft traditions

July 22, 2016 by  
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Completed as part of the Kingston University Degree Show 2016, the Seminar House Pavilion combines traditional craftsmanship found in British and Japanese culture. The students drew inspiration from their study abroad trip to Nagano and Tokyo , where they toured a variety of Japanese buildings , from a 16th century timber castle to a self-built concrete house. Fujimori also gave talks on the “Red School,” a term he coined to describe a group of Japanese architects recognized for the handmade aspects of their buildings. Related: Terunobu Fujimori’s Otherworldly Tree Houses Defy the Laws of Gravity The top-heavy Seminar House Pavilion comprises three tiers, each clad in different materials and partially constructed of recycled materials from the 2015 pavilion. Four zinc -clad “legs” support a middle section covered in around 1,000 sweet chestnut shingles. The topmost section is clad in Yakisugi, or Shou-Sugi-Ban, a type of burnt cedar wood commonly used in Japan for siding and decking projects. Students created the cladding materials in a series of workshops. Visitors can access the pavilion’s different levels via wooden ladders. The project will be open to the public during museum hours from summer to autumn. + Kingston University + Dorich House Museum Via Dezeen

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Handcrafted timber pavilion celebrates British and Japanese craft traditions

These LEGO-like recycled plastic bricks create sturdy homes for just $5,200

July 22, 2016 by  
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Colombian company Conceptos Plásticos saw two pressing issues in the world and decided to tackle both with recycled building materials . One issue is the housing crisis , prevalent in Latin America where 80 percent of the population now resides in urban areas. The second is the overwhelming amount of plastic crowding landfills. To combat these issues, Conceptos Plásticos recycles plastic into LEGO-like building blocks that families can use to easily construct their own homes. Conceptos Plásticos works with local communities to source plastic and rubber and train locals on the building process. With the building blocks, locals can build their own houses, emergency shelters, community halls, and classrooms. A home for one family will take four people five days to construct with the recycled building blocks – and there’s no construction experience necessary. The blocks fit together like LEGOs . Related: Aussie surfer designs prefab recycled cyclone-resistant homes Not only are the pieces easy to work with, they’ll resist natural disasters as well. Conceptos Plásticos puts an additive that makes the product fire-resistant, and since the blocks are made of plastic, they’ll also resist earthquakes. The company reports their ” construction system is 30 percent cheaper ” than systems traditionally utilized in rural areas. A standard home can be constructed for just $5,200 . The plastic building blocks will degrade around 500 years or more down the road, but for now they offer shelters for families who can’t afford other housing or are fleeing crises. The plastic building blocks have already helped people. In 2015, 42 families were ” displaced by violence ” in Colombia, and Conceptos Plásticos helped build a hostel for the families that could easily be torn down and rebuilt elsewhere if they ever had to move again. Mendez told Forbes, “We hope to create a movement where more and more people get involved. We want to develop new products that make better use of the thousands and thousands of tons of plastic that is discarded. There will soon be more plastic in the sea than fish, so we really need to do something big.” Conceptos Plásticos recently won $300,000 in a competition called The Venture. + Conceptos Plásticos Via Forbes Images via Conceptos Plásticos Facebook

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These LEGO-like recycled plastic bricks create sturdy homes for just $5,200

Gorgeous Charred-Cedar Clads an Oasis of Calm at a Three-Road Juncture in Tokyo

September 23, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Gorgeous Charred-Cedar Clads an Oasis of Calm at a Three-Road Juncture in Tokyo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cedar , cedar home , charred cedar , Japanese architects , japanese architecture , MDS Tokyo , Naruse House , Natural building materials , Tokyo , wooden architecture

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Gorgeous Charred-Cedar Clads an Oasis of Calm at a Three-Road Juncture in Tokyo

INFOGRAPHIC: 50 Ways Your Home Could Help Save the Earth

September 22, 2014 by  
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So you’ve already swapped out your incandescent bulbs for LEDs and installed a smart thermostat – what else can you do to green your home? Good to Be Home has you covered with a new infographic that shows 50 ways you can lower your home’s environmental footprint (as well as your utility bills). Check out the full infographic after the break! Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: 50 Ways Your Home Could Help Save the Earth Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , 50 ways your home can save the earth , efficiency , energy efficiency tips , energy efficient house , good to be home , Green Building , green design , green home , green home tips , infographic , sustainable design , sustainable home

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INFOGRAPHIC: 50 Ways Your Home Could Help Save the Earth

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