30 new marine species found in Galapagos’ deep seas

September 9, 2020 by  
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The  Galapagos  Islands are famous for several endemic species that evolved to fit the exact niche required to live on rocky islands 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador in the Pacific Ocean. Now, marine scientists have found 30 new species deep beneath the ocean’s surface around the Galapagos.  Using cutting-edge remote operated vehicles (ROV), expedition crews from the  Charles Darwin Foundation , the  Galapagos National Park Directorate and the  Ocean Exploration Trust  explored seamounts as far down as 3,400 meters. Seamounts are extinct underwater  mountains  entirely covered by seawater. Until now, the Galapagos seamounts were largely unexplored. Related: Iguanas reintroduced to island after 200 years The 30 newly identified species include 10 bamboo corals, 11 sponges, four squat lobsters and a brittle star. Scientists also found four new octocorals. Commonly known as sea fans, octocorals are polyp-bearing  corals . One of the four new octocorals is the first giant solitary soft coral found in the Tropical Eastern Pacific. These new research findings come from a 10-day cruise on the 64-meter research vessel the E/V Nautilus. Scientists manipulated arms on the ship’s two ROVs to collect biological and geological specimens. After the expedition, the team sent these samples to deep-sea experts for identification and analysis. “The many discoveries made on this expedition showcase the importance of deep-sea exploration to developing an understanding of our oceans and the power of telepresence to build a diverse team of experts,” Dr. Nicole Raineault, chief scientist of the Ocean Exploration Trust, said in a press release. “Since we never know what we’re going to find, we utilize land-based scientists who watch the ROV dives from home and communicate directly with the shipboard team in real time, to help determine what is truly new and worthy of further investigation or sampling. Scientists studying the resulting video, data, and specimens make an astonishing number of discoveries, reminding us how little we know about the deep  sea .” The new deep-sea dwelling creatures will never become as familiar to visitors as more visible endemic species, such as the Galapagos penguin, giant  tortoises and marine iguanas. Still, these species hint at the many mysteries dwelling in Earth’s oceans. + Charles Darwin Foundation Via EcoWatch Images via Ocean Exploration Trust/Nautilus Live and Pexels

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30 new marine species found in Galapagos’ deep seas

Tree of Life redesigned to reflect thousands of new species

April 13, 2016 by  
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Bacteria fill the Earth, and a new scientific study reveals just how prevalent they are. Scientists led by biologist Laura Hug, who currently teaches at the University of Waterloo , mapped a new Tree of Life diagram that contradicts past images. The Tree of Life used to highlight our visible environment, including mainly animals and plants, but the new Tree of Life draws attention to the most massive invisible population on our globe: bacteria. Read the rest of Tree of Life redesigned to reflect thousands of new species

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Tree of Life redesigned to reflect thousands of new species

Blu Homes launches 16 new affordable prefab home designs, including new tiny homes

April 13, 2016 by  
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As a dynamic force in the prefabricated green building industry , Blu Homes has consistently been pushing the boundaries of prefab home design for many years. That’s why we’re excited to announce that the California-based prefab home manufacturer is unveiling a bunch of new house designs in a wider variety of sizes and at dramatically lower price points than ever before, including some new tiny homes and a charming prefab farmhouse. Inhabitat visited their historic 250,000 square-foot factory in Vallejo, Northern California to get the scoop. Read on for the exclusive details. Read the rest of Blu Homes launches 16 new affordable prefab home designs, including new tiny homes

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Blu Homes launches 16 new affordable prefab home designs, including new tiny homes

Researchers find that the blind cave fish evolved a smaller brain in order to survive

October 9, 2015 by  
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In the dark waters of a limestone cave in northeastern Mexico , a blind fish makes its home. Washed into the cave at some time in the distant past, the fish had no choice but to survive by eating bat droppings and not much else. With no light, their distinct pigmentation was useless and was lost to evolution. With nothing to see, their eyesight – and eventually their eyes and a significant part of their brains – were the next things to go. Biologists in Sweden report that these losses save the fish energy and were probably vital to the species’ continued survival. Read the rest of Researchers find that the blind cave fish evolved a smaller brain in order to survive

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Researchers find that the blind cave fish evolved a smaller brain in order to survive

The Open Tree of Life Project Uses Web-Based Software to Record the Earth’s 1.8 Million Named Species

March 24, 2014 by  
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Since the dawn of time, humans have sought to name and catalog the plants and animals around them. The adoption of a common taxonomic system from naturalist Carolus Linnaeus and Theory of Evolution from Charles Darwin continues to allow today’s biologists to place species in phylogenetic trees. These charts show how organisms evolved from a common ancestor into their myriad of current incarnations. The Open Tree of Life project hopes to gather all 1.8 million named species into one gigantic online open-source database , letting scientists across the world share their knowledge and construct a grand picture of diversity. Read the rest of The Open Tree of Life Project Uses Web-Based Software to Record the Earth’s 1.8 Million Named Species Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Big Bang , Biodiversity , carolus linnaeus , charles darwin , dryad , online platform , open source software , phylogenetic tree , species catalog , thoery of evolution , treebase        

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The Open Tree of Life Project Uses Web-Based Software to Record the Earth’s 1.8 Million Named Species

Google’s New ‘Street View’ Maps Let You Dive in the Galapagos Islands!

September 13, 2013 by  
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Google has coursed the Amazon , swam the Great Barrier Reef and scaled the Burj Khalifa – and now the tech giant has launched their latest Street View Trekker project with a collection of incredible maps of Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands . Allowing users to become “Darwin for a Day,” the 360-degree street view maps swim with marine life and hike over islands that Darwin likely encountered in his historic venture 178 years ago. Viewers can even help with ongoing conservation in the region by identifying the plants and animals on screen. Read the rest of Google’s New ‘Street View’ Maps Let You Dive in the Galapagos Islands! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: catlin seaview , charles darwin , charles darwin foundation , converstaion , galapagos islands , galapagos national park , google conservation , Google maps , Google Street View , google trekker , iNaturalist , sea lion , Street View , street view trekker        

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Google’s New ‘Street View’ Maps Let You Dive in the Galapagos Islands!

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Bombardier Beetle Teach Us About Fuel Injection?

August 26, 2013 by  
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Charles Darwin was a man inordinately fond of beetles. He once caught a rare specimen in one hand, when another, even more remarkable, beetle showed up. He snatched that one up with his other hand. Suddenly, an extraordinary third species crawled past. Darwin, in despair over losing any of them, popped the first one in his mouth. With “unspeakable disgust and pain” he discovered it was a Bombardier Beetle—the only known creature to mix a boiling hot chemical explosion inside its own body. As it squirted livid acid down his throat, he spit the “little inconsiderate beast” out, and all three beetles made their getaway. The Bombardier is a six-legged tank, fitted with two little weapons of destruction: a pair of deadly, swiveling rocket launchers, firing high-pressure clouds of hot, acrid gas to injure shrews, birds, and frogs, and kill would-be invertebrate predators. So, what can we learn from this acerbic little bug? Read on to learn more in our latest installation of The Biomimicry Manual . Read the rest of The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Bombardier Beetle Teach Us About Fuel Injection? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: beetles , bioinspired design , biomimicry , Bombardier beetle , bugs and design , fuel injection , green design , green innovation , inspired designs        

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The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Bombardier Beetle Teach Us About Fuel Injection?

Shelburne Museum for the Arts Adds a Light-Filled LEED Addition to Its Beautiful Campus

August 26, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Shelburne Museum for the Arts Adds a Light-Filled LEED Addition to Its Beautiful Campus Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ann beha architects , eco design , green design , LEED museum , Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education , Shelburne Museum for the Arts , sustainable design , sustainable museum , Vermont museum        

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Shelburne Museum for the Arts Adds a Light-Filled LEED Addition to Its Beautiful Campus

Wildfire Spending Surpasses $1 Billion During Peak Fire Season

August 26, 2013 by  
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Wildfire spending soared past $1 billion last week as over fifty fires blazed out of control across the Western U.S. When the U.S. Forest Service budget dwindled down to just $50 million during the peak wildfire season, the agency was forced to divert $600 million in funds from timber, recreation, and other areas to fill the gap. As these destructive infernos rapidly increase in recent years, studies show climate change as the main cause behind the flames. Read the rest of Wildfire Spending Surpasses $1 Billion During Peak Fire Season Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , climate change wildfires , fire season , forest policy reform , us forest service , wildfire , wildfire budget , wildfire policy        

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Wildfire Spending Surpasses $1 Billion During Peak Fire Season

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