A prefab chapels sculptural form amplifies the landscape in Uruguay

July 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A prefab chapels sculptural form amplifies the landscape in Uruguay

Perched on a hilltop in a bucolic rural landscape in Uruguay, the Sacromonte Chapel is a minimalist, prefabricated structure designed to coexist with nature in harmony. Designed by Uruguay-and Brazil-based architecture firm MAPA , this sculptural place of worship is set on one of the highest peaks in the traditional Andalusian neighborhood Sacromonte and overlooks unobstructed, panoramic views of its surroundings. The building was mainly constructed from cross-laminated timber panels and steel and was assembled onsite in just one day. Crafted as a “landscape amplifier,” the Sacromonte Chapel takes cues from its surroundings — a rolling landscape of vineyards, lagoons, hills and shelters — and features a relatively simple shape that complements the environment. The chapel comprises two cross-laminated timber panels — measuring nearly 20 by 30 feet in size — angled toward one another, like a pair of hands in prayer, without actually touching. The semi-enclosed structure simultaneously creates a defined interior while remaining open to the environment. “How should the sacred spaces of the 21st century be? The chapel ponders possible interpretations of this and other questions through its ambiguous relationship with matter, space and time,” MAPA said in a project statement. “A peaceful tension reigns when in contact with it. A tension between weight and lightness, presence and disappearance, technology and nature . Enigmatic and mystifying, it leaves its visitors with more questions than answers.” Related: Provocative timber horn explores the hypnotic pull of the unknown The Sacromonte Chapel was prefabricated in a factory in Portugal and then transported to the site for assembly. The architects strived to use as few resources as possible to make a simple and austere design statement. A black metal box faced with a sheet of translucent onyx punctuates one of the timber planes and houses a statue of the Virgin of “La Carrodilla.” A slender timber cross was installed in front of the chapel. + MAPA Images by Tali Kimelman

Originally posted here: 
A prefab chapels sculptural form amplifies the landscape in Uruguay

Vatican Citys first-ever pavilion debuts at the Venice Architecture Biennale

June 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Vatican Citys first-ever pavilion debuts at the Venice Architecture Biennale

The Vatican Chapels Pavilion of the Holy See opened to fanfare last week, marking Vatican City’s debut at the 16th Venice Architecture Biennale. Curated by Professor Francesco Dal Co, the temporary installation consists of 10 chapel-inspired pavilions, each designed by a different renowned design practice from around the world. Perhaps the most anticipated of them all is the pavilion by Foster + Partners , which takes the form of an open-air chapel built with a tensegrity structure. Spread out across the picturesque San Giorgio Maggiore Island, the Vatican Chapels Pavilion of the Holy See is set in a contemplative wooded environment. Foster + Partners’ chapel is located between two mature trees on one end of the island and connects to the lagoon beyond. The chapel comprises a tensegrity structure made up of three upright crosses that support a larch latticework membrane connected with steel cables and masts. Italian furniture company Tecno built the installation. “The project started with the selection of the site,” explained Norman Foster, founder of Foster + Partners. “On a visit to San Giorgio Maggiore, close to Palladio’s magnificent church and the Teatro Verde, I found a green space with two mature trees beautifully framing the view of the lagoon. It was like a small oasis in the big garden, perfect for contemplation. Our aim was to create a small space diffused with dappled shade and removed from the normality of passers-by, focused instead on the water and sky beyond – a sanctuary.” Related: Foster+Partners unveil design for first-ever Vatican Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale The larch membrane allows dappled light to pass through the chapel’s interior. The tensegrity structure was also engineered to withstand wind loads. Jasmine vines are planted around the structure and will grow overtop it in time to soften its contours and add an extra sensory element. The pavilion will remain open to the public until November 25, 2018. + Foster + Partners Images by Nigel Young/Foster + Partners

Read more from the original source: 
Vatican Citys first-ever pavilion debuts at the Venice Architecture Biennale

Stunning chapel in Japan brings a fractal forest indoors

December 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Stunning chapel in Japan brings a fractal forest indoors

Not all chapels need stained glass windows and soaring archways to take your breath away. This Japanese timber chapel in Nagasaki injects a stunning fractal-like forest indoors for an instant wow factor. Yu Momoeda Architecture Office designed the minimalist chapel with floor-to-ceiling windows to take in sweeping views of the surrounding views of the national park and sea. The boxy 125-square-meter Agri Chapel is a modern interpretation of Oura-Tenshudo, Japan’s oldest timber gothic chapel and national treasure that’s also located in Nagasaki. In contrast to its 19th century predecessor, the new-build chapel is a modernist temple of glass and steel. Seven-meter-tall windows on all sides of the building frame different views of the landscape including the sea, park, mountains, and hills. Related: Mexico’s gorgeous Sunset Chapel looks like a gigantic boulder The tree-like wooden units inserted into the interior are made up of three layers with varying thickness of cedar . Steel rods provide horizontal support. The timber installation’s fractal pattern is based off of 45-degree rotations. Simple wooden furnishings complement the vertical timber supports in the otherwise all-white building. + Yu Momoeda Architecture Office Via ArchDaily

Read the original here:
Stunning chapel in Japan brings a fractal forest indoors

Mexico’s gorgeous Sunset Chapel looks like a gigantic boulder

August 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Mexico’s gorgeous Sunset Chapel looks like a gigantic boulder

Through several contrasting features, this striking chapel in Acapulco, Mexico embodies feelings of both hope and sadness. Mexico City-based Bunker Arquitectura constructed the Sunset Chapel on top of a hill and gave it an appearance of a huge boulder that blends into the natural environment. Bunker Arquitectura combined contrasting materials – glass and concrete – to embody elements of transparency and solidity, merging opposing ideas and religious contexts. The chapel mimics the large granite rocks piled up on the hill to blend into the surrounding landscape. Related: BNKR Arquitectura Reveals Plans for an Incredible Underground Skyscraper in Mexico City A triangular aperture functions as the main entrance into the small interior, while smaller slits in the walls provide views of the surroundings and allow natural light inside. A fully glazed wall on the upper floor features a crucifix which dominates the space. + Bunker Arquitectura Via Ignant Photos by Esteban Suárez

See the original post here:
Mexico’s gorgeous Sunset Chapel looks like a gigantic boulder

People in Denmark are earning up to $1,530 just by parking their EVs

August 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on People in Denmark are earning up to $1,530 just by parking their EVs

What if you could get cash for parking your electric car ? Vehicle owners in Denmark have been able to do just that, bringing in around 1,300 Euros, or around $1,530, a year by feeding excess power back into the grid. Nissan Motor Company conducted trials in the country with Italy’s utility company Enel SpA to show how EV batteries could help ease constraints on the electrical grid. Nissan has run trials with over 100 cars throughout Europe, but so far only owners in Denmark have been able to earn cash by parking their vehicle and sending power to the grid . Using two-way charge points, owners have been able to rake in $1,530 annually, according to Nissan Europe energy services director Francisco Carranza. Related: Tesla is doubling its Supercharger network by the end of the year to 10,000 chargers Electric car owners in the United Kingdom could be next to score a payday – due to restrictions on accessing the market, Nissan needs to get up to 150 cars before people can earn money. Carranza estimates they could hit that number later this year. He told Bloomberg, “It’s just a matter of finding the appropriate business model to deploy the business wide-scale.” Electric car demand, expected to grow around the world, could place a strain on local electrical grid operators trying to figure out ways to balance demand. According to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, power consumption from cars will climb from around six terawatt-hours today to 1,800 terawatt-hours in 2040. The scheme of using car batteries to balance supply and demand could help grid operators while potentially allowing car owners to earn some extra money with minimal effort. According to a July 2017 Business Insider article , the Danish government recently cut back subsidies for electric vehicles and sales fell – at that point in 2017 a mere 182 electric cars had been sold in the country. But Denmark also has more EV charging docks than petrol stations. Via Bloomberg Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

View original here:
People in Denmark are earning up to $1,530 just by parking their EVs

Nuns build open-air chapel to protest natural gas pipeline on their land

July 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Nuns build open-air chapel to protest natural gas pipeline on their land

Battles against fossil fuel pipelines aren’t limited to North Dakota. In Lancaster County, Pennsylvania , a group of Catholic nuns is fighting against a natural gas pipeline that would run beneath land they own. They’re protesting the pipeline in a unique way by building an open-air chapel for people to visit and reflect on “just and holy uses of land.” The nuns, part of the Adorers of the Blood of Christ order, own land in West Hempfield Township that stands in the path of the Atlantic Sunrise Project, a pipeline for natural gas being pursued by Williams Partners to extend the Transco pipeline system that already runs from Texas to New York. Even though the nuns have not wanted their land used for the pipeline, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has approved the pipeline, pointing to eminent domain. Related: Trump approves new pipeline that will go “right under” the US-Mexico wall The nuns are working against the pipeline, which they say goes against their land ethic, with the group Lancaster Against Pipelines . Protester Ann Neumann told CNN, “They see the pipeline as a violation of their faith,” saying 20 members of the order reside on the land. In a visible symbol of protest, the nuns allowed Lancaster Against Pipelines to construct this outdoor chapel, intended for people of all faith backgrounds. The nuns hope the chapel will draw people to come and pray at the location. They said in a statement they know the pipeline company might call for the chapel’s removal, but “believe that having this structure on their land, for however long, gives tangible witness to the sacredness of Earth.” The chapel was dedicated over the weekend, and according to Lancaster Online, around 300 people showed up for the ceremony. A Williams Partners spokesperson referred to the chapel as a “blatant attempt to impede pipeline construction.” Via CNN , Adorers of the Blood of Christ , and Lancaster Online Images via NoPipelinesLancaster on Twitter and Adorers of the Blood of Christ

Read more from the original source: 
Nuns build open-air chapel to protest natural gas pipeline on their land

Breathtaking chapel clings to the cliffside for transcendent sea views

August 30, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Breathtaking chapel clings to the cliffside for transcendent sea views

OPA is perhaps most famous for their jaw-dropping Casa Brutale, another cliffside building with confirmed plans for construction . Like its predecessor, Lux Aeterna is dramatically embedded into a rocky cliff and sports a giant cross-shaped facade made of glass that gives the building the appearance of a glowing lighthouse at night. Guests enter the underground chapel via a series of concrete steps that lead down into the earth, which helps create thermal insulation to regulate internal temperatures. “Purity of belief is celebrated in this minimalistic design devoid of earthly distractive elements,” says OPA. “The chapel is the third building of the Terra Mater trilogy of underground buildings. Proposed for the island of Serifos, it possesses a single cliff façade that faces the Aegean sea, positioning the human vis a vis with the beauty and magnanimity of creation.” Related: Crazy home carved into a coastal cliff has a swimming pool roof The interior is minimally decorated and made almost entirely from concrete save for the timber flooring, benches, and door that lend the space a touch of warmth. Aside from the giant east-facing glazed cross, stained glass decorates the other openings. Colorful cross-shaped skylights create a beautiful play of colored light inside the chapel. + Open Platform for Architecture Via ArchDaily Images via Open Platform for Architecture

See the original post here: 
Breathtaking chapel clings to the cliffside for transcendent sea views

Stunning Seashore Chapel in China appears to float at high tide

July 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Stunning Seashore Chapel in China appears to float at high tide

Located on the beach next to China’s Bohai Sea, the Seashore Chapel serves the resort community as both a religious space and a community gathering space for public events. The chapel was created in a similar fashion to Vector Architects’ Seashore Library, a nearby concrete building completed last year at Nandaihe. Unlike its sandy-colored predecessor, the Seashore Chapel is covered in brilliant white stucco with laminated bamboo slate and glass curtain walls . The 270-square-meter Seashore Chapel is divided into two main areas. The first is a covered, sea-facing outdoor space that, as the architects describe it, connects the “religious space to the mundane life,” and is submerged by water at high tide. The second space is the elevated chapel with its steep gable roof accessed via a 30-meter-long staircase. The ascent leads visitors to a panoramic view of the sea through a large horizontal window on the east facade. Related: Elegant Japanese wedding chapel mimics curved leaves Windows are strategically placed to limit the amount of harsh light to the interior, while allowing diffused natural light to stream in and highlight the textures of the stucco walls. Hidden windows allow for natural ventilation to flow through the building. “Together with Seashore Library, [the Seashore Chapel] provides spiritual spaces at ocean front, where people can slow down their pace, experience the nature and examine their inner state,” write the architects. + Vector Architects Images via Vector Architects

See the rest here: 
Stunning Seashore Chapel in China appears to float at high tide

Gorgeous Sayama Forest Chapel in Japan resembles hands clasped in prayer

August 19, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Gorgeous Sayama Forest Chapel in Japan resembles hands clasped in prayer

Read the rest of Gorgeous Sayama Forest Chapel in Japan resembles hands clasped in prayer

View original here:
Gorgeous Sayama Forest Chapel in Japan resembles hands clasped in prayer

The Rainbow Chapel’s stunning kaleidoscope windows reference ancient Chinese symbolism

July 3, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The Rainbow Chapel’s stunning kaleidoscope windows reference ancient Chinese symbolism

Read the rest of The Rainbow Chapel’s stunning kaleidoscope windows reference ancient Chinese symbolism Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: chinese architects , colored glass , coordination asia , glass facade , green renovation , museum park , natural light , Rainbow Chapel , Shangai , wedding chapel

Original post:
The Rainbow Chapel’s stunning kaleidoscope windows reference ancient Chinese symbolism

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 802 access attempts in the last 7 days.