Mount Rushmore fireworks display sparks concerns

June 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mount Rushmore fireworks display sparks concerns

Despite a decade-long ban on fireworks at Mount Rushmore on environmental and public health grounds, President Trump is planning a fireworks show at the famous site on July 3. Critics are worried about the threat of wildfire and the spread of coronavirus . The National Park Service halted fireworks displays at Mount Rushmore in 2010 to avoid wildfires accelerated by drought conditions. The monument is famous for its four presidential faces — George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln — but also includes 1,200 acres of forest and is close to Black Hills National Forest’s Black Elk Wilderness. Related: Crowds fill national park for Yellowstone reopening With a high temperature of 80 degrees predicted for the Fourth of July weekend paired with moderate drought conditions, not everybody is cheering for fireworks. “It’s a bad idea based on the wildland fire risk, the impact to the water quality of the memorial, the fact that it is going to occur during a pandemic without social distancing guidelines and the emergency evacuation issues,” Cheryl Schreier, who was superintendent at Mount Rushmore National Park from 2010-2019, told The Washington Post . Trump has yearned to see fireworks over Mount Rushmore for years and has downplayed the wildfire risk. “What can burn? It’s stone,” he said in January, according to Popular Mechanics . The 7,500 people who won tickets to the event in an online lottery will be urged to wear face coverings if they’re unable to social distance. South Dakota has so far escaped the worst of coronavirus. According to CDC statistics , at the time of writing this article, the state had 6,626 confirmed cases and 91 deaths. A fireworks display over Mount Rushmore is especially symbolic at a time when protesters seeking an end to racial discrimination are tearing down monuments. Statues of Jefferson and Washington have elsewhere been removed by people decrying the former presidents as slave owners. Mount Rushmore has an especially troubled history. The Lakota Sioux hold the Black Hills sacred. Having the faces of their European conquerors immortalized on stolen stone is viewed as the ultimate desecration. Via PBS , Ecowatch and Weather Channel Image via Pixabay

View original here:
Mount Rushmore fireworks display sparks concerns

Can manufacturing green sand beaches save our planet?

June 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Can manufacturing green sand beaches save our planet?

It sounds too good to be true — spread some rocks on a beach and the ocean will do the work to remove carbon dioxide from the air, reversing global warming. But that’s a very simplified explanation of what Project Vesta hopes to accomplish. The idea is to accelerate a natural process. When rain falls on volcanic rocks, it weathers them down, then flows into the ocean. There, oceans further break down the rocks. Carbon dioxide removed from the air becomes bicarbonate, which helps grow the shells of marine organisms and is stored in limestone on the ocean floor. Project Vesta wants to speed up this process by grinding up olivine — a common, gray-green silicate that weathers quickly — and spreading it on beaches and in shallow shelf seas around the world. It has worked in a lab, but will it work in the real world? We’re about to find out, as Project Vesta is now preparing a pilot beach in the Caribbean. Related: Demand for sand — the largest mining industry no one talks about Origins of Project Vesta Project Vesta has rounded up an international crew of scientists, environmentalists, futurists and financial experts since its founding on Earth Day 2019. The not-for-profit organization sprang from a think tank called Climitigation , Project Vesta executive director Tom Green told Inhabitat. “It’s very clear at this point that in order to avoid the worst effects of global warming, reducing emissions will not be enough,” Green said. “Maybe 20 years ago that would have been a viable path. But at this point, even though we should reduce emissions , that on its own will not be enough to avoid the worst scenario.” Climitigation examined different ways to reverse global warming , prioritizing them according to their viability. The idea of coastal weathering came to the top, Green said, “as being potentially very, very cheap, very scalable, a permanent carbon catcher, with relatively little attention that had been paid to it so far. So Project Vesta was founded out of that think tank, and we exist to further the science of enhanced weathering ultimately to galvanize global deployment that will help reverse climate change.” The idea of coastal weathering has 30 years of academic research in the fields of biology and geochemistry behind it. But it had stalled out, unable to cross the financial chasm from academic to mainstream, said Green, who trained as a biologist before spending 20 years in business at various tech companies. “Nobody had come along and said, ‘Okay, I’m going to push this forward.’ That’s what we’re here to do.” The pilot beach Scientists at Project Vesta had a set of criteria for finding the right pilot beach. “We scoured the world for an ideal site,” Green said. “This initial site that we found is great for our pilot beach site. It’s a fairly enclosed cove, which means the water has a pretty low refresh rate. Which means that as the chemical reaction happens, there’s enough time for the biogeochemical indicators to change before the water gets washed away into ocean.” In a few months, after thoroughly measuring the test cove, Project Vesta will cover the pilot beach with ground olivine. Then comes the monitoring phase. Scientists will sample water and sand, measuring indicators like DIC, or dissolved inorganic carbon , which directly measures the amount of carbon in the water. “These indicators are designed to measure the speed of the reaction that’s happening and actually look at the carbon as it is being removed from the atmosphere,” Green explained. “On the biological side, we’ll also be measuring the prevalence of various species that are there, both macroscopic and microscopic species, and looking at any changes in that as the experiment proceeds.” A nearly identical cove less than a quarter mile away will serve as a control cove. One concern is whether olivine could release nickel or other heavy metals into the water. Green told Fast Company that this nickel won’t be bioavailable, so it won’t harm marine species. But the pilot study will monitor metal concentrations to assess the real life impact to sand , water and local marine organisms. In addition to removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, Project Vesta hopes that more green beaches will reverse the ocean’s rising acidity. “The reaction that happens when olivine dissolves actually makes the ocean less acidic,” Green said. “ Ocean acidification is a major problem and is causing problems for a lot of species. It’s very clear that doing this will reduce acidity at the site where it’s done. And then there’s a hypothesis that that will actually be beneficial for local marine ecosystems. But we don’t know that yet for sure. We need to test it out.” Green beaches could also be a tourism draw. Papakolea on Hawaii’s Big Island is the world’s most famous green sand beach. It does more than alright for itself, tourist-wise. Future green beaches The Project Vesta folks hope that they’ll see a positive impact on their pilot beach within a year. If it’s successful, they’ll work with interested governments to expand the project. Green anticipates that members of the V20 — countries especially susceptible to climate change — may be especially receptive to green sand beaches. Island nations with lots of shoreline will be top candidates. If all went perfectly, how long would it take for green sand beaches to reverse climate change? Project Vesta scientists estimate they’ll need to dump ground olivine in 2% of the world’s shelf seas — the shallow coastal waters surrounding every continent — for the plan to work. “The scale of the problem is so big that any solution will also be largescale,” Green said. Project Vesta plans to find local or nearby sources of olivine to save financial and carbon costs of transporting the green rock. Even when factoring in the mining and transportation, the project claims it can capture 20 times the carbon it takes to make a green sand beach. Moving all these rocks will cost money. The credit card processing company Stripe is one of the project’s backers, in keeping with its pledge to spend $1 million a year on carbon removal technologies . Individuals can make donations of any size on Project Vesta’s website or support the project by buying a Grain of Hope necklace for $25. Fittingly, the jewelry sports a single grain of olivine suspended in a sand timer vial, symbolizing that time is running out on reversing climate change. + Project Vesta Images via Project Vesta

The rest is here: 
Can manufacturing green sand beaches save our planet?

Tiny living helps this family cut costs and find balance

June 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tiny living helps this family cut costs and find balance

When one tiny house is just a bit too tiny, why not get two? One single mom who flipped houses for a living decided to do just that, choosing not one but two tiny homes that she placed side-by-side to provide room for herself and her two daughters. This is an elegant solution for those who want to try tiny living on a slightly larger scale. One tiny home houses mom Amanda Lee’s bedroom, along with the living room, kitchen and bathroom. The second tiny home is split in half to house a bedroom and wardrobe area for each of Lee’s daughters. The homes are 168 and 219 square feet and connected with a large, covered porch . The porch increases the overall living space. Thanks to her two tiny homes, Lee is totally debt-free. Since she opted to live almost completely off-grid , her utility bills stay low. Thanks to her reduced living expenses, Lee bought herself plenty of time to spend with her children. She now works from her tiny home at her consulting business. Lee’s tiny homes were created by Aussie Tiny Houses, a company that specializes in creating beautiful, yet practical, tiny homes. The company’s website showcases several models, including designs that can sleep up to four people. The website also offers a few buying options. Homebuyers can opt for a lock-up, a shell or a turn-key tiny home that’s ready to be lived in. The design Lee chose is the gorgeous Casuarina 8.4. This tiny home is 26 feet long, 7.8 feet wide and 14 feet high. Casuarina’s features include stunning cathedral ceilings, full-height pantry storage in the kitchen and space for a washing machine. There’s also a full-height fridge in the kitchen and a bathroom with a storage loft. Casuarina’s design includes a steel frame, aluminum windows, insulated SMART glass , recessed LED lighting, USB charging points and waterproof vinyl floorboards. Buyers can also opt for various upgrades, including light dimmer switches, built-in Bluetooth ceiling speakers, skylights , external storage boxes and different kitchen appliance options. The tiny house movement has caught fire all over the world, as more people learn that they can make do with less living space. This approach certainly worked for Lee, whose smart solution gives her the freedom to work from home and focus on family. + Aussie Tiny Houses Via Tiny House Talk Images via Aussie Tiny Houses

Go here to read the rest:
Tiny living helps this family cut costs and find balance

Boris Johnson proposes 22-mile bridge to connect UK and France

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Boris Johnson proposes 22-mile bridge to connect UK and France

Could a 22-mile bridge crossing the English Channel help boost transport between the United Kingdom and France after Brexit ? Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson thinks so – he proposed the infrastructure project and spoke about a second link with France’s president Emmanuel Macron . Johnson reportedly said to Macron that it’s ridiculous that two of the largest economies in the world are joined by only one railway line. The publication said Macron “is understood to have responded positively.” Johnson tweeted a picture of the two of them flashing a thumbs-up after what he described as great meetings. En marche ! Great meetings with French counterparts today pic.twitter.com/D73B1rSkd3 — Boris Johnson (@BorisJohnson) January 18, 2018 Related: New bridge linking Japan and Russia could enable 8400-mile rail trip from London to Tokyo But some people put the brakes on the idea . The United Kingdom Chamber of Shipping, which represents over 180 maritime industry bodies, tweeted there would be challenges with such an undertaking. CEO Guy Platten told The Guardian the Dover Strait – at the English Channel’s narrowest part – “is the world’s busiest shipping lane” and that the largest ships going through the strait can be around 70 meters, or nearly 230 feet, tall. Others pointed out that such a bridge would be incredibly expensive. Building a huge concrete structure in the middle of the world’s busiest shipping lane might come with some challenges. https://t.co/jYD5O8B19W — UK Shipping (@ukshipping) January 18, 2018 Reuters reported France’s finance minister Bruno Le Maire told Europe 1 radio, “All ideas merit consideration, even the most far-fetched ones … Let’s finish things that are already under way before thinking of new ones.” And a spokesperson for prime minister Theresa May said there were “no specific plans” regarding a Channel bridge: “What was agreed yesterday, and I think that’s what the foreign secretary tweeted about as well, is a panel of experts who will look at major projects together including infrastructure.” But according to The Guardian, some engineers said the Channel bridge idea might not be so far-fetched; architect Alan Dunlop pointed to the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge, which is around 34 miles long. Bridge designer Ian Firth told BBC Radio 4’s Today program the project would be entirely feasible, and that before construction of the Channel tunnel there were bridge options being considered. Firth said, “There are bridges of a similar, if not quite the same, scale elsewhere…It would be a huge undertaking, but it would be absolutely possible, and shipping impact issues could be dealt with.” Via The Guardian (1, 2) and Reuters Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

View original here: 
Boris Johnson proposes 22-mile bridge to connect UK and France

Melting Arctic Ice Opens New Shipping Channel for Petroleum Products

July 15, 2014 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Melting Arctic Ice Opens New Shipping Channel for Petroleum Products

In a move that blatantly disregards the impacts of climate change , shipping companies are taking advantage of melting Arctic ice to cut transportation times for petroleum products. Channel News Asia reports that Japanese shipping company Mitsui O.S.K. Lines recently announced plans to create the world’s first shipping route through the Arctic Ocean starting in 2018. The company would be mainly shipping liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Russia’s Yamal project to markets in Europe and Asia using three specially designed icebreakers for transport. The route is expected to trim 10 days of travel time from the current route through the Suez Canal . Read the rest of Melting Arctic Ice Opens New Shipping Channel for Petroleum Products Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arctic , change , Channel , climate , global , ice , Japan , liquefied , lng , Mitsui , natural gas , oil , russia , shipping , warming , yamal

Read the rest here:
Melting Arctic Ice Opens New Shipping Channel for Petroleum Products

Three Wise Men Combine Wood, Craft and an LED into One Lamp

April 26, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Three Wise Men Combine Wood, Craft and an LED into One Lamp

Three Wise Men are a group of lovely wooden lamps handcrafted into different sizes and shapes. Designed by Hong-Kong-born, UK-based Samuel Chan for his own brand Channel , they give off a warm and focused shine thanks to the use of an E27 LED bulb. The lamps were crafted from solid American white oak and American black walnut and given a slender bottle-like top. The series takes its name from the group of men who (according to the Bible) visited Jesus when he was born—we however spotted them hanging at this year’s  Milan Design Week. + Channel Photos by Silvia Perfetti for Inhabitat and Channels Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , American black walnut , American white oak , Channel , green lighting , handmade , lamps , Milan Design Week 2013 , Milan Furniture Fair , Samuel Chan , Wood , wooden lamps        

The rest is here:
Three Wise Men Combine Wood, Craft and an LED into One Lamp

MIT Developing Floating Wind Turbines That Produce Power Even When There’s No Wind

April 26, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on MIT Developing Floating Wind Turbines That Produce Power Even When There’s No Wind

Critics of wind power keep coming back to the same old complaint: what happens when there’s no wind? A new design from researchers at MIT could finally offer a solution to this renewable energy conundrum. Engineers have conceived of an offshore wind turbine anchored by hollow concrete spheres that could also turn seawater into electricity. The turbine would allow offshore wind farm managers to store excess energy for a time when there’s no wind. Read the rest of MIT Developing Floating Wind Turbines That Produce Power Even When There’s No Wind Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “wind power” , “wind turbine” , coral reefs , floating wind turbines , MArine Power , MIT , offshore wind , wind farm        

Read more:
MIT Developing Floating Wind Turbines That Produce Power Even When There’s No Wind

ROPE ME Interiors Made From 100% Recycled Materials Unveiled During Milan Design Week

April 26, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on ROPE ME Interiors Made From 100% Recycled Materials Unveiled During Milan Design Week

Zona Tortona showcases unique, outside-the-box thinking every year during Milan Design Week – and few designers exemplify this better than Italy’s IDI Studio . A keen user of FSC certified wood , this charming design studio showed off several cool interiors at Milan Design Week  earlier this month, but we were particularly enamored with the firm’s ROPE ME series, which is made from 100-percent recycled materials. Read the rest of ROPE ME Interiors Made From 100% Recycled Materials Unveiled During Milan Design Week Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , fsc certified wood , green design , Green Design Events , green interiors , IDI Studio , italy , marine rope , Milan Design Week , recyclable materials , Recycled Materials , ROPE ME , sustainable design , zona tortona        

Go here to see the original: 
ROPE ME Interiors Made From 100% Recycled Materials Unveiled During Milan Design Week

Bad Behavior has blocked 4430 access attempts in the last 7 days.