Living solar panel wallpaper harvests energy thanks to photosynthesis

November 7, 2017 by  
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Researchers created an incredible  energy-harvesting wallpaper by inkjet-printing circuitry and cyanobacteria on paper. The cyanobacteria lived through the printing process, and then performed photosynthesis to harvest power. Imperial College London described the product as a two-in-one solar bio-battery and solar panel , and said an iPad-sized piece of the wallpaper could energize a digital clock or LED light bulb. Imperial College London, University of Cambridge , and Central Saint Martins researchers worked together on the project. They utilized cyanobacteria as ink, printing the bacteria with an inkjet printer onto electrically conductive carbon nanotubes , which had also been inkjet-printed on the paper, according to Imperial College London . The cyanobacteria – still alive – performed photosynthesis, allowing the bio-solar panel to harvest electrical energy. Related: Brilliant conductive wallpaper shows the energy running through your walls The researchers think there could be several applications for their living wallpaper. Marin Sawa of Imperial College London said in a statement, “Imagine a paper-based, disposable environmental sensor disguised as wallpaper, which could monitor air quality in the home. When it has done its job it could be removed and left to biodegrade in the garden without any impact on the environment.” The research offers a development in microbial biophotovoltaics (BPV) technology , exploiting “the ability of cyanobacteria and other algae that use photosynthesis to convert light energy into an electrical current using water as the source of electrons,” according to Imperial College London. Cyanobacteria can not only generate electricity during the day, but at night as well, from molecules they produced in daylight. BPVs can be difficult to scale up – two obstacles being expense and lifespan – but the team’s use of an off-the-shelf inkjet printer could allow them to scale up the technology easily. Andrea Fantuzzi, also of Imperial College London, said paper-based BPVs wouldn’t be used to produce solar power on a large scale, “but instead could be used to construct power supplies that are both disposable and biodegradable. Their low power output means they are more suited to devices and applications that require a small and finite amount of energy, such as environmental sensing and biosensors .” The journal Nature Communications published the research online yesterday. Via Imperial College London Images courtesy of Imperial College London

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Living solar panel wallpaper harvests energy thanks to photosynthesis

Ergonomically-Correct ‘Wellbeing Toilet’ Helps You Poop the Right Way

February 7, 2016 by  
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The toilet , ubiquitous as it is, hasn’t changed much in design or function since indoor plumbing became a thing. In honor of World Toilet Day , plumbing and drain specialists Dyno-Rod decided to change that by holding a competition to create the next-generation loo prototype. The winning design is the Wellbeing Toilet – the world’s first ergonomically-correct loo. Designed by three Central Saint Martin’s (CSM) graduates, this toilet could actually reduce the risk of intestinal cancer and haemorrhoids. Read the rest of Ergonomically-Correct ‘Wellbeing Toilet’ Helps You Poop the Right Way

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Ergonomically-Correct ‘Wellbeing Toilet’ Helps You Poop the Right Way

Restless Futures Showcases Emerging Technologies and their Potential Consequences at the London Design Festival 2014

September 17, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Restless Futures Showcases Emerging Technologies and their Potential Consequences at the London Design Festival 2014 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , Central Saint Martins , emerging technologies , futuristic design , Lethaby Gallery , London Design Festival , London Design Festival 2014 , Restless Futures

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Restless Futures Showcases Emerging Technologies and their Potential Consequences at the London Design Festival 2014

Cassandra Verity Green Draws Criticism for Fishbowl Handbags

August 17, 2013 by  
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Designer Cassandra Verity Green caused quite a stir at the Central Saint Martins fashion show when she unveiled a line of perspex fishbowl backpacks and purses. The  Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals  wasn’t having any of it. “While we understand that a graduate fashion show is about grabbing attention and headlines, we do have concerns that using a living creature to create a novel or unusual accessory encourages people to see them as replaceable ornaments, rather than living creatures in need of care and commitment,” said a RSPCA spokeswoman  in a statement . What’s your opinion on using living fish as accessories? Head over to Ecouterre to take a poll. READ MORE >   Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Cassandra Verity Green , Central Saint Martins , Fashion , fashion show , fish purse , goldfish , purse        

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Cassandra Verity Green Draws Criticism for Fishbowl Handbags

“Recycling the Dead” Turns Cremated Remains Into Textiles for Products

June 19, 2012 by  
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So maybe your life lacks purpose at the moment, at least you can rest easy knowing your body could still serve a function well after your spirit has left the earth. Kerry Greville , a student at   Central Saint Martins  in London, is exploring the provocative notion that we can—and should—extract chemical components from  cremated remains  for the production of textiles. ”It is my belief that the only resource we can lay claim to is our body,” Greville says. “Every other resource is taken without consent.” What do you think? Is her idea outrageous or on point? READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bizarre eco-fashion , Central Saint Martins , cremation , eco friendly textiles , eco textiles , eco-art , eco-fashion , Ethical Fashion , green fashion , Kerry Greville , Sustainable Fashion , sustainable style , Sustainable Textiles , Textile Futures

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“Recycling the Dead” Turns Cremated Remains Into Textiles for Products

Chinese Claim GM Crops Are Beneficial As They Reduce (Certain) Pests

June 19, 2012 by  
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Ge netically modified crops have drawn their fair share of criticism over the years, despite their potential to feed the world. However, regardless of the multiple pros and cons , China is now saying that GM crops are not only a necessity, but they are good for the environment. This bold claim revolves around crops that are designed to make their own insecticide, which they say boosts populations of natural pest-controlling predators and therefore neighboring plants. Read the rest of Chinese Claim GM Crops Are Beneficial As They Reduce (Certain) Pests Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , chinese academy of agricultural science , dwarf wheat , GM Crops , GM wheat , gm wheat aphids , green farming , norman borlaug , pesticide resistance , pesticides , pests , Rothamsted Research , Rothamsted Research gm wheat risk , Rothamsted Research protests , Rothamsted Research Take the Flour Back , Rothamsted Research wheat , Take The Flour Back

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Chinese Claim GM Crops Are Beneficial As They Reduce (Certain) Pests

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