An energy-efficient modern church references Utahs mining history

October 11, 2018 by  
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Salt Lake City-based design practice Sparano + Mooney Architecture  designed a church for West Valley City, Utah that’s strikingly modern yet sensitive to the existing site context. Located near Bingham Canyon Copper Mine, the world’s deepest open pit mine and a major employer in the area, the church pays homage to the working class community’s mining and construction past with its material palette. The award-winning, LEED Silver-targeted church — named Saint Joseph the Worker Church after the patron saint of laborers — was completed on a budget of $4.5 million and spans 23,000 square feet. In order to comfortably seat 800 people within a reasonably close distance to the altar, Sparano + Mooney Architecture designed Saint Joseph the Worker Church in a circular form with rounded and thick board-formed concrete walls. In addition to the new 800-seat church, the 10-acre site also includes an administrative building with offices and meeting rooms, indoor and outdoor community gathering and fellowship spaces, a large walled courtyard centered on a water feature and ample landscaping. After the architects salvaged parts of the original, now-demolished church that was built in 1965, they added new elements of steel, copper and handcrafted timber to reference the area’s mining and construction past. “Drawing from this lineage, a palette of materials was selected that express the transformation of the raw material by the worker, revealing the craft and method of construction,” the architects explained. Related: Historic Australian church transformed into a stunning family home for five “These materials include textural walls of board-formed concrete, constructed in the traditional method of stacking rough sawn lumber; a rainscreen of clear milled cedar; vertical grain fir boards and timbers used to create the altar reredos and interior of the Day Chapel; flat seam copper panels form the cladding for the Day Chapel and skylight structure over the altar; and glazing components requiring a highly crafted assembly of laminated glazing with color inter-layers, acid etched glazing, and clear glass insulated units with mullion-less corners,” the firm said. “The design harkens back to the mining history of the early parish, and details ordinary materials to become extraordinary.” + Sparano + Mooney Architecture Images by Dana Sohm, Jeremy Bittermann and Sparano + Mooney Architecture

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An energy-efficient modern church references Utahs mining history

LEED Gold home celebrates Utah’s brilliant light and beauty

September 28, 2018 by  
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Designed to “celebrate Utah’s brilliant light and raw beauty,” this LEED Gold -certified family home in Utah embraces indoor-outdoor living. Salt Lake City-based Sparano + Mooney Architecture crafted the home for clients who sought the perfect mountain home in Park City, Utah. Working in step with interior designer Julie Chahine of J Squared interior design and clients who had a clear idea of what they wanted, the architects pulled together a sustainable and contemporary dwelling that works in concert with the landscape inside and out. Perched at a high elevation overlooking views of Park City and the Utah Winter Olympic Park, the two-story Park City Modern Residence was designed with a sensitive approach to the landscape. The site-specific design and division of the public areas from the private zones were informed by the existing topography. Outdoor terraces offer a seamless connection to the outdoors with immediate access from the master suite and living room; an accessible green roof planted with native flora also offers stellar views of a nearby golf course. To relate the home to the mountain environment punctuated by highly textured scrub oak, the architects employed a nature-inspired material palette mainly comprising cedar wood, glass and board-formed concrete. “These were inspired through a study of transparency, minimalism and serenity,” the architecture firm noted in a project statement. “The architecture and interiors are speaking the same language — the details, color schemes and artwork — all worked so perfectly with the architecture. Julie’s palette came from nature, and our materiality did too.” Related: A historic farmhouse is transformed into a modern home with a green roof Certified LEED Gold, the 5,500-square-foot abode draws renewable energy from a ground-source heat pump and keeps its energy demands low with high performance, energy-efficient building systems. Passive solar orientation also helps the home keep comfortably cool in the summer months and retains heat and access to natural light in winter. + Sparano + Mooney Architecture Images by Derek Israelsen

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LEED Gold home celebrates Utah’s brilliant light and beauty

A dome made of rearview mirrors, seat belts and soda bottles floats on Grand River

September 28, 2018 by  
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Husband-and-wife team Amanda Schachter and Alexander Levi of New York City-based SLO Architecture recently set afloat the latest iteration in their series of Harvest Domes — massive dome-shaped installations made from locally sourced, repurposed materials . Dubbed Harvest Dome 3.0, their most recent buoyant installation can be found in the Grand River of Grand Rapids, Michigan, where it celebrates the waterway’s heritage and role in powering the city’s manufacturing legacy. Measuring 20 feet in diameter, the colorful orb was constructed from a mix of surplus seat belts, rearview mirrors and soda bottles. Set afloat last month, Harvest Dome 3.0 was created for ArtPrize 10, a 19-day free event where artists from around the world transform three square miles of downtown Grand Rapids into an open-air gallery of art installations. SLO Architecture’s highly site-specific addition to this year’s line-up uses local materials harvested from the Grand River industry. Buoyed by a ring of 128 repurposed two-liter soda bottles, Harvest Dome 3.0 measures 20 feet in depth, 20 feet in width and 18 feet in height. “While the river’s energy propelled Grand Rapids to become a center for logging, furniture fabrication and automotive industries, the possibility of the river also engendered changes to landscape ecology, leading to flooding and contamination,” the designers explained in a project statement. “The transcendent abstract form of Harvest Dome 3.0 emerges from a flotsam of accumulated materials, its bright blue seat belt lines and sky-and-water-reflecting rearview mirrors shimmering like a bubble coming up from the surging rapids, transfiguring the river’s power and possibility.” Related: Beautiful Harvest Dome constructed from 450 found umbrellas wins the Dwell Vision Award A team of workers assembled the dome next to the Grand River over a series of days in late August. It was then lifted into the river by a crane and is secured in the water with ropes. ArtPrize 10 concludes October 7, 2018. + SLO Architecture Via ArchDaily Images via Scott Rasmussen / SLO Architecture; lead image via TJ Mattieu / SLO Architecture

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A dome made of rearview mirrors, seat belts and soda bottles floats on Grand River

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