14,000-year-old animal paintings discovered in underground Spanish cave

June 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 14,000-year-old animal paintings discovered in underground Spanish cave

Archaeologist Deigo Garate made the amazing find nearly 1,000 feet underground in the northern Spanish cave . No one had excavated the area that deeply yet, even though Garate has spent ten years searching Basque Country caves and Atxurra has been known for over 80 years. He told The Local , “It is an exceptional find, the equivalent of discovering a lost Picasso.” Related: 5.5-million-year-old cave holds prehistoric secrets few people have ever seen The paintings were found in excellent condition, with charcoal and flint tools nearby. One depiction features a bison being hunted and pierced with over twenty spears – the most detailed, speared bison depiction in all of Europe. The Atxurra discovery could also be hold the record for most animal figures in all of Basque Country. Garate says, “Without doubt it is the most important discovery of my career.” Via Hyperallergenic Images via Bizkaia Provincial Council

Here is the original:
14,000-year-old animal paintings discovered in underground Spanish cave

World’s highest and longest glass bridge in China whacked with a sledgehammer

June 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on World’s highest and longest glass bridge in China whacked with a sledgehammer

The world’s highest and longest glass-bottomed bridge is expected to open in next month in central China . The glass walkway spans some 1,400 feet—over a quarter of a mile—across the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon  in one of the country’s most pristine national parks. Before opening day, though, bridge officials hope to reassure people about its safety. To prove the bridge is strong enough to hold hundreds of visitors at a time, they invited BBC Click’s Dan Simmons to visit the bridge, and take a few swings at one of its glass panels with a sledgehammer . Of course, it was all captured on video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guWLBG-htrU Residents and visitors to China have reason to be a little nervous about glass-bottomed bridges. Last fall, another glass bridge in China cracked just two weeks after celebrating its grand opening. A visitor dropped a mug on the walkway, causing the glass to shatter and become unstable. The bridge had to be evacuated immediately and was closed for lengthy repairs. Related: World’s tallest and longest glass bridge announced for China’s Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon The new bridge in Zhangjiajie is engineered to withstand a beating, though. Each segment of the bridge is composed of three layers of ultra-strong glass. It’s so strong, in fact, that it can survive a dozen or more swings of a giant sledgehammer. Simmons was tapped to perform the test on a duplicate pane of glass, the same kind used in the bridge itself, elevated on a platform midway across the bridge. With cameras rolling and the bridge’s manager looking on with encouragement, Simmons’ first blow shattered the top layer of glass . Much like a fractured windshield, the glass fragments were held together within the frame. Simmons hit the glass again and again, putting all his weight behind each swing of the sledgehammer, but the bottom two layers of the glass showed little sign of damage, and the glass platform remained stable as Simmons and the bridge president stood on top of it. Given the sledgehammer test results, would you feel safe walking across a quarter-mile bridge with nothing but a few layers of glass between you and the nearly 1,000-foot drop to the canyon floor? Via BBC Images via BBC (via screenshot)

See the rest here: 
World’s highest and longest glass bridge in China whacked with a sledgehammer

Scientists Discover What May Be the World’s Oldest Art in Indonesia

October 10, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Scientists Discover What May Be the World’s Oldest Art in Indonesia

Move over Europe: a new discovery in Indonesia could knock the western continent from its popular position as the cradle for early human creativity. According to the journal Nature , an Australian-Indonesian team of researchers made the surprising discovery that cave paintings found in Sulawesi, Indonesia date back to at least 35,000 to 40,000 years old, making them some of the oldest art known. The breakthrough research challenges the Eurocentric view of the origins of art and suggests that the earliest artists may have come from Africa. Read the rest of Scientists Discover What May Be the World’s Oldest Art in Indonesia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ancient art , art discovery , birthplace of art , cave art , cave paintings , el Castillo , indonesia , limestone caves , pig deer , Sulawesi

Here is the original:
Scientists Discover What May Be the World’s Oldest Art in Indonesia

Bad Behavior has blocked 1491 access attempts in the last 7 days.