Asif Khan unveils the darkest building on earth for 2018 Winter Olympics

February 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Asif Khan unveils the darkest building on earth for 2018 Winter Olympics

British-based architect Asif Khan unveiled a super-black pavilion at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics that he describes as the “darkest building on earth.” Built for Hyundai Motor, the temporary Pyeongchang Olympic Park pavilion is fully coated in Vantablack VBx2—a material that can absorb 99 percent of the light that hits its surface. As a result, the pavilion looks like a gaping black void even in broad daylight. Standing at 10 meters (33 feet) tall, the 2018 Winter Olympics Hyundai Motor pavilion draws inspiration from the automotive company’s technology and offers a unique interactive experience. Khan attached thousands of tiny white lights to the super-black parabolic facades, evoking images of a starry night sky. The steel-framed building measures 35 meters (115 feet) by 35 meters. In contrast to the super-dark facade, the interior is a brightly lit white room housing a multi-sensory interactive water installation. Haptic sensors allow visitors to interact with the hydrophobic installation that emits 25,000 singular water droplets per minute; the water droplets zoom down channels, collide, split, and eventually pool into a drain. “From a distance the structure has the appearance of a window looking into the depths of outer space,” said Khan. “As you approach it, this impression grows to fill your entire field of view. So on entering the building, it feels as though you are being absorbed into a cloud of blackness.” Related: Video: Anish Kapoor’s “Decension” is a black vortex in the floor of an old movie theater He continues: “The water installation visitors discover inside is brightly lit in white. As your eyes adjust, you feel for a moment that the tiny water drops are at the scale of the stars. A water droplet is a size every visitor is familiar with. In the project I wanted to move from the scale of the cosmos to the scale of water droplets in a few steps. The droplets contain the same hydrogen from the beginning of the universe as the stars.” The 2018 Winter Olympics Hyundai Motor Pavilion will open at the Pyeongchang 2018 Opening Ceremony on February 9, 2018. + Asif Khan Via WAN Images via Luke Hayes

Read the original here:
Asif Khan unveils the darkest building on earth for 2018 Winter Olympics

Tree-topped bridge to double as public space for a historic Chinese town

February 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tree-topped bridge to double as public space for a historic Chinese town

MVRDV has won a competition for Dawn Bridge, a new multi-use bridge near Shanghai that will give locals and visitors the chance to experience a historic Chinese water town in a whole new way. Located near the famous water town Zhujiajiao, this new 80-meter-long landmark will be topped with trees and amphitheater-like seating that overlooks views of the water and riverside architecture. To blend the modern bridge into its surroundings, the architects drew a contextual palette of colors and materials referencing the local vernacular. Located between the 16th century Fangsheng Bridge and the Qingpu Road Bridge, the 24-meter-wide Dawn Bridge will mark a new era of development in the riverfront area. MVRDV’s winning design proposes a bridge that doubles as public space by turning part of the deck into amphitheater -like seating optimized for gatherings, meetings, and beautiful views of Zhujiajiao. The bridge also provides sufficient clearance to the approximately 80-meter-wide active riverbed that’s used for activities year-round. “The vertical alignment of Dawn Bridge defines a sense of lightness and elegance, and our aim was to provide a graceful low curve above the river that also blends with the landscape”, says Wenchian Shi, Partner at MVRDV. “Beyond blending, we wanted to create a bridge that invites public life over and around it and that is accessible to all people whether on foot or on wheels.” Related: World’s first 3D-printed bridge opens in the Netherlands The bridge’s pedestrian deck and landings will be painted in the same reddish hue as the wood found in the nearby houses, while the gray roofs and white walls of the local residences are echoed in the bridge’s white structural frame and gray asphalt. Proposed plantings and trees on the bridge mimic the greenery of the riverbanks . Completion is anticipated for 2019. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

Go here to read the rest:
Tree-topped bridge to double as public space for a historic Chinese town

Nations largest timber office building unveiled for Newark

February 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Nations largest timber office building unveiled for Newark

A 500,000-square-foot office building is set to rise in Newark , NJ—and once complete will be the largest mass timber office structure in the U.S. Designed by Vancouver firm Michael Green Architecture (MGA), the project is part of Riverfront Square, an 11.8-acre mixed-use development headed by New York-based Lotus Equity Group. The proposed Newark office will consist of three interconnected volumes and will be more than double the size of the nation’s currently largest mass-timber building, the T3 North Loop M building in Minneapolis that was also designed by MGA. Mass-timber construction is growing in popularity across the U.S. and is lauded for fast construction, strength, and eco-friendly benefits. “The vision we share with Michael Green is to design the most environmentally sustainable office tower that enhances the health of tenants and the surrounding communities through efficient planning and green design,” Ben Korman, founder of Lotus Equity Group, said in a press release. Though the building will be built on a concrete foundation, the structural components will be mass timber and will be treated to be fire resistant. Related: America’s largest modern timber building pieces together like LEGO The building comprises three stepped volumes ascending from six to eight and then 11 stories. The exterior will be clad in either brick or metal panels, while the interiors will feature exposed wood and be bathed in natural light thanks to ample glazing and a central atrium . Workers will also enjoy access to rooftop gardens . + Michael Green Architecture Via Dezeen

Read more here: 
Nations largest timber office building unveiled for Newark

Minimalist glasshouse in Australia adds a tropical resort-like twist

February 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Minimalist glasshouse in Australia adds a tropical resort-like twist

Sarah Waller of Sarah Waller Architecture seized on a chance to build her dream home after a move took her from the UK to Australia. Channeling her love of minimalism and mid-century modern architecture, she designed and built Glasshouse, a 660-square-meter home in Noosa, Australia. Full-height glass spans the length of the home and blur the distinction between indoor and outdoor living. Simple lines, a monochromatic palette, and ample glazing help integrate the spacious steel-framed home into the surroundings that have been transformed with lush landscaping for a more tropical feel. Timber and the addition of greenery throughout the interior help break up the mostly black and white palette inside and out. Sarah drew inspiration from Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and the Philip Johnson Glasshouse . Related: Prefab Glass House lets you bring home the spirit of Philip Johnson’s masterpiece Luxury pervades Glasshouse, from the resort-like linear pool and cabana to the incredible master bathroom that opens up to a deep freestanding outdoor bath surrounded by greenery. The master bedroom is enveloped almost entirely in glass with framed views of coconut palm trees. Indoor and outdoor entertaining areas punctuate the home. + Sarah Waller Architecture Photos by Paul Smith Images

Read the original post:
Minimalist glasshouse in Australia adds a tropical resort-like twist

Icelandic-inspired tiny dwellings ship flat-pack and sell for under $50K

February 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Icelandic-inspired tiny dwellings ship flat-pack and sell for under $50K

“What would you do with 320 square feet?” That’s the question put forth by the adorable and affordable Plús Hús, an Icelandic-inspired tiny dwelling designed to pop up with ease in any backyard. Designed by Minarc , Plús Hús (Icelandic for “plus house”) is an Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) prefabricated at mnmMOD’s facility in downtown Los Angeles, shipped flat pack, and assembled with minimal waste. The Plús Hús can be delivered anywhere in the U.S. and pricing for the customizable units starts at $37,000. Measuring 16 feet by 20 feet, Plús Hús originated as a response to an amended Los Angeles law that expands usage options for ADUs installed in the backyards of single-family homes. Minarc was perfectly poised for the rollout given their design of the mnmMOD kit-of-parts prefabrication system that constructs energy-efficient homes out of custom-designed structurally insulated wall-panels. The tiny homes lend themselves to a wide variety of uses from Airbnb rental to home office. “Tryggvi and I have been developing our ADU product in anticipation of these regulatory changes for some time, and are beyond excited to introduce Plús Hús to the world,” says Minarc co-founder Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir. “The mnmMOD panel system is versatile, recyclable, and extremely energy efficient , and being from Iceland we pay very close attention to the relationships between nature, ourselves, and what we create. We are constantly looking for ways to do better, and using mnmMOD to create Plús Hús––a simple, efficient, multi-purposable structure that capitalizes on these recent law changes while minimizing wasted energy and environmental impact––makes perfect sense.” Related: These prefabricated mnmMOD wall panels could revolutionize the way we build There are currently three models of Plús Hús: the Plús Hús Open with three walls and a sliding door; the Plús Hús Open+ that comes with a bathroom; and the Plús Hús Full that includes a bathroom and kitchen. The use of mnmMOD’s highly efficient, no-wood prefab panel system ensures extremely high insulation value that minimizes energy usage. The unit is also completely recyclable at the end of its lifecycle. Pricing for the units ranges from $37,000 to $49,000 not including site prep, delivery, or installation. + Plús Hús

Continued here:
Icelandic-inspired tiny dwellings ship flat-pack and sell for under $50K

HASSELL and MVRDV tackle climate change in the Bay Area

January 31, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on HASSELL and MVRDV tackle climate change in the Bay Area

A HASSELL -led design team that includes MVRDV has unveiled their preliminary proposed design strategy for tackling climate change in the San Francisco Bay Area as part of the yearlong Resilient by Design research challenge. The design team collected research by collaborating with local residents, design firms, experts, and public officials. Their findings identify existing areas of weakness in South San Francisco and potential design solutions for San Mateo County; the team will further develop the proposed strategy that will be presented in May. Modeled after the successful Rebuild by Design challenge, Resilient by Design asked designers around the world to develop community-based solutions that would protect the San Francisco Bay Area from sea level rise , severe storms, flooding, and earthquakes. Ten winning design teams were selected to embark on the yearlong research and design challenge, among them the HASSELL-led team that includes MVRDV, Deltares, Goudappel, Lotus Water, Civic Edge, Idyllist, Hatch, and Page & Turnbull. “ Climate change is real, by the end of the century there will be a sea level rise of 2 meters. Bay Area communities respond to this challenge in a multi-disciplinary approach to upgrade their general resilience,” said Nathalie de Vries, MVRDV co-founder. “We developed a flexible toolbox for San Mateo which helps the local community by revitalising public spaces that collect and connect people and water.” Related: Resilient infrastructure proposal aims to protect San Francisco Bay from rising sea levels Their recently released renderings and diagrams offer proposals for reconnecting San Francisco communities to the waterfront and for protecting the land from climate challenges. The team drew on historic precedent, such as responses to the devastating 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and observations of the recent Northern California wildfires. “The team now has the opportunity to apply its ‘collect and connect’ toolkit to proposed sites in South San Francisco,” wrote the design team, referring to the way streets and creeks are rethought of as connectors from a water management standpoint, while adaptive open spaces serve as collectors for everyday gathering, big events, and disaster assembly. “At Colma Creek, HASSELL has imagined a new Shoreline Park. Meanwhile, Grand Avenue will become a vital community hub with a drop-in storefront people can visit during the design phase. The team’s design process will draw heavily on local voices and insights to ensure that design solutions – which will be presented in May – reflect the community’s needs. In addition to the drop-in centre, city residents will be able to access a digital platform to learn about adapting for resilience and get involved in decision making.” + HASSELL + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

Originally posted here: 
HASSELL and MVRDV tackle climate change in the Bay Area

Y-shaped German hostel looks at sustainability from all angles

January 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Y-shaped German hostel looks at sustainability from all angles

A newly opened youth hostel in Bayreuth, Germany offers much more than just a clean bed and shower—the 180-bed Y-shaped building embraces community, holistic sustainability, and a passion for sports. Laboratory for Visionary Architecture (LAVA) designed the hostel as an extension of the landscape with natural materials and a curvaceous form that’s organic and contemporary. Commissioned by DJH Bayern, the eye-catching youth hostel takes on a distinctive Y shape chosen “because it cleverly generates a connective central space and interweaves the interior and exterior spaces, offering expansive views and multiple accessible openings to the sports fields and gardens.” Sports are a major focus of the design and the hostel is equipped with sports fields, adventure playgrounds and volleyball terraces. The building’s universal design makes it accessible to all kinds of users for optimum use of the facility. Related: Nha Trang’s first hostel built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Vietnam A central atrium at the heart of the hostel serves as the social hub with a light-filled amphitheater that branches out to the reception, seminar rooms, bistro, kitchen, sport facilities, and bedrooms spread out across two floors. Natural, locally sourced materials are used throughout and were built with local techniques. Renewable energy powers the hostel and pollution reduction is integrated in the design. A highly flexible modular wooden wall system with modular custom built-in furniture was used for the hostel’s 45 rooms. The use of modular, replaceable walls also allows for future reuse of the building as a kindergarten, school or retirement home. + Laboratory for Visionary Architecture Images by HN?fele Huber

View original here: 
Y-shaped German hostel looks at sustainability from all angles

Dumping ground reborn as beautiful bamboo and rammed-earth community space

January 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Dumping ground reborn as beautiful bamboo and rammed-earth community space

H&P Architects dramatically transformed an informal dumping ground in Mao Khe, Vietnam into a beautiful pavilion built mainly of locally sourced bamboo and earth. Named BE (bamboo & earth) friendly space, the structure comprises a zigzagging rammed-earth wall punctuated with multiple openings and topped with bamboo roofing. The project was created as part of a series of projects to create a “friendly space in suffocating urban areas” increasingly dominated by concrete. Located in the center of the populous Vietnamese town of Mao Khe, BE friendly space is a 220-square-meter pavilion made of local natural materials and constructed by local labor. “The objective of BE friendly space is to help raise social awareness of the need for friendly spaces for community in the context of urbanization and concretization which is gradually suffocating Mao Khe – one of the most populous towns in Vietnam, thereby making contributions to shaping actions of community in the process of creating sustainable spaces for the future immediately from today’s friendliness,” said H&P Architects in a design statement. Related: Plant-covered bamboo structure in Vietnam offers low-cost sanitation and food A 40-centimeter-thick zigzagging rammed-earth wall forms the spine of the project and its short, asymmetric form stands out from the skinny modern apartments that surround it. Randomly placed windows connect the various spaces enclosed by the wall and promote natural ventilation . BE friendly space comprises several multifunctional open areas, while the service room, kitchen, and toilets are located in the fully enclosed rammed-earth building on the east side of the site. + H&P Architects Images by Nguyen Tien Thanh, Doan Thanh Ha

View original here: 
Dumping ground reborn as beautiful bamboo and rammed-earth community space

Greenery fills this sustainable glass-and-timber tower planned for Oslo

January 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Greenery fills this sustainable glass-and-timber tower planned for Oslo

Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter AS and C.F Møller Arkitekter have won a design competition for a stunning new cultural hub set to rise in Oslo. The project, called Nordic Light, comprises a master plan for the area and a modular glass-enclosed timber tower that will further develop the Oslo Central Station area into Norway’s largest mixed-use hub. The renderings show Nordic Light with greenery growing inside and out of the building on multiple levels as part of the architects’ sustainable vision for the tower, which will aim for BREEAM Excellent certification. Created for Fjordporten Oslo S, Nordic Light is designed to revitalize the area around the main train station with new publicly accessible cultural, retail, and dining facilities. The project will consist of four main elements: the area around the 19th-century station, a cultural and conference base, a pergola that links Queen Eufemia’s Street with the station, and the modular tower housing hotels and offices. The timber structure will be wrapped in a transparent glass facade allowing views of large trees and plants that will grow inside the building at multiple levels. The building will be designed to BREEAM Excellent with a focus on life cycle costing and life cycle assessment to inform sustainable building decisions. Related: Northern Europe’s largest aquarium unveiled for former Oslo airport site “‘Nordic light’ takes its strength from a controlled and careful form expression,” said the jury. “The project’s proposed integration with the station areas and the overall draft of the blueprint will help to further develop Oslo S as the country’s largest collective hub, and will offer the travellers great new spatial and qualitative experiences. The project showcases good solutions for the design and connection of the adjacent spaces to the project. The architect’s approach provides a good potential for the rehabilitation and enhancement of the protected Østbanen structure, and will give it a central role as part of the station’s future visual identity.” + Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter AS + C.F Møller Arkitekter Images by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter AS and C.F Møller Arkitekter

See more here: 
Greenery fills this sustainable glass-and-timber tower planned for Oslo

Shimmering bamboo-shaped skyscraper to rise in Taipei

January 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Shimmering bamboo-shaped skyscraper to rise in Taipei

Move over Taipei 101—a new green-glass skyscraper will soon transform the city skyline. Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel and Partners (ACPV) unveiled designs for the Taipei Sky Tower, a 280-meter-tall building that, like Taiwan’s tallest tower , draws design inspiration from bamboo shoots. The luxury mixed-use development will house two Hyatt-branded luxury hotels—Park Hyatt Taipei and Andaz Taipei. Commissioned by Riant Capital Limited, ACPV’s Taipei Sky Tower design was selected from a shortlist of seven international firms. Billed as “Taiwan’s first large-scale lifestyle-driven development,” the sleek 54-story tower will be set in Xinyi, the city’s financial district flush with new modern construction projects, including the carbon-absorbing Agora Garden . In addition to Taipei Sky Tower’s two hotels, the mixed-use building will also feature a luxury retail podium. Related: Vincent Callebaut’s twisting carbon-absorbing skyscraper nears completion in Taipei Taipei Sky Tower will feature curved edges, a segmented facade, and an angled roofline to mimic a bamboo shoot with notched sections. The design also draws inspiration from the pleats of Greek columns. “ACPV aims to create an ultra-modern 280 -meter tall skyscraper by blending some of the oldest elements from the East and West in modern harmony,” reads a press release. ACPV will lead the design for Park Hyatt Taipei, while the design for Andaz will be given over to Neri&Hu . The project is slated for completion in 2020. + Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel and Partners Via Dezeen Images via Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel and Partners

Original post: 
Shimmering bamboo-shaped skyscraper to rise in Taipei

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1493 access attempts in the last 7 days.