A massive, egg-shaped bird observatory features reusable natural materials

April 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A massive, egg-shaped bird observatory features reusable natural materials

Bird lovers in the Netherlands now have a new way of watching their feathered friends thanks to the recent opening of the Tij, a massive wooden bird observatory created with sustainability in mind. Designed by Amsterdam-based RAU Architects in collaboration with Ro&Ad Architects , the unique bird blind is in the shape of an egg in a nod to the thousands of large terns that nest nearby. To reduce environmental impact, the architects constructed the observatory primarily out of wood with modular construction so that the structure can be taken apart, moved and rebuilt in a different location. Opened this month, the Tij is part of the Droomfonds Haringvliet, a project started by six nature organizations and supported by the Droomfonds of the National Postcode Lottery to conserve and bring recreational opportunities to the Haringvliet, a large inlet of the North Sea in South Holland . The Tij was strategically located at the water’s edge to overlook spectacular nature views and the rich bird life, including the terns’ nesting grounds on the small islands off the coast of Scheelhoek. “Thanks to its complete rebuilding capabilities, modularity and materialization, it fully meets all the key points for a sustainable structure with circular potential,” explained Thomas Rau, chief architect of Tij, which was named in reference to the tide and the egg-shaped design. “By building everything in such a way that everything can be taken apart without losing any of its value, we ensure that the strain on the ecosystem is minimal. The shape of the observatory is extra special, mimicking the egg of the large tern. Nature itself produced this shape.” Related: IKEA teams up with London artists to upcycle old furniture into funky abodes for birds, bees and bats The parametrically designed bird observatory is built mainly of natural materials . The large wood panels are made by a file-to-factory Zollinger construction while the slim poles are chestnut. The facade is covered with local reeds sourced from the Scheelhoek nature reserve and pre-used bulkheads were repurposed into the tunnel to the observatory. In case of rising water levels, the lower portion of the bird observatory can be safely submerged under water without sustaining damage; the bottom part of the “egg” is built of Accoya wooden beams and the floor is made from wood and concrete. + RAU Architects Photography by Katja Effting via RAU Architects

More: 
A massive, egg-shaped bird observatory features reusable natural materials

Cozy pop-up Seedpods let you escape into nature with a minimal footprint

April 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Cozy pop-up Seedpods let you escape into nature with a minimal footprint

Reconnecting with Mother Nature has been elevated to new heights with Nomadic Resorts ‘ latest treehouse initiative — the Seedpod. Shaped like a human nest, these lightweight sleeping pods are designed for minimal landscape impact and can pop up in remote locations in just one day. The pop-up hotel rooms were recently installed in Mauritius’ Bel Ombre Nature Reserve, where they were hung from trees and made to “float” above the forest floor. Founded in 2011 as a reaction against the environmental footprint of traditional hotel development, Nomadic Resorts is an interdisciplinary design and project development company that services the hospitality industry with sustainable and contemporary projects. The Seedpod, developed after years of research, builds on the company’s commitment to low-impact design. Drawing inspiration from the shape of a seed and a bird’s nest, Nomadic Resorts crafted an aerodynamic structure that is not only capable of resisting wind speeds of 120 kilometers per hour, but can also be quickly installed in remote locations without using heavy machinery or power tools. “Our goal was to take inspiration from the humble seed to create a floating hotel room that was both ephemeral and robust — comfortable but exciting to sleep in,” said Louis Thompson, the CEO of Nomadic Resorts. “The idea is that sleeping in the pod is a transformative experience in its own right — a chance to spend a night in a human nest where you can see the movement of the wildlife below and hear the gurgling of the stream. Our team has been striving to find a symbiotic, harmonious relationship with the sites we develop. To achieve that, we need to find a compromise between durability and sustainability, environmental integrity and guest comfort — size was an important consideration in that discussion — it is the place, not the space, that is true luxury.” Related: Nomadic Resorts’ tiny prefab pod homes can pop up anywhere The Seedpod debut at the Heritage Nature Reserve consists of two units set up for a unique picnic experience where visitors can learn about the endemic forest, swim in the natural pools and enjoy a mosquito-free lunch inside each room. The pods, which were attached to trees at the reserve, can also be erected on their own with an optional tripod and equipped with lighting, solar panels , a ceiling fan, a cool box and a charging station for devices. Each unit measures nearly 12.5 feet in height (nearly 7.5 feet for internal height) and slightly over 7 feet in diameter. + Nomadic Resorts Images via Nomadic Resorts and The Heritage Nature Reserve

Go here to see the original: 
Cozy pop-up Seedpods let you escape into nature with a minimal footprint

Henning Larsen breaks ground on BEAM Platinum-targeted Shaw Auditorium in Hong Kong

April 23, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Henning Larsen breaks ground on BEAM Platinum-targeted Shaw Auditorium in Hong Kong

Shortly after completing the “greenest school” in Hong Kong , Copenhagen-based Henning Larsen has broken ground on yet another sustainability-minded project— the Shaw Auditorium for The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Designed with modular seating, the multipurpose auditorium will be a flexible space that can accommodate a wide range of cultural events from concerts and musicals to conventions and exhibitions. The elliptical building will also feature climate-optimized design for reduced energy consumption and is expected to become the first of its kind in Hong Kong to achieve the city’s BEAM (Building Environmental Assessment Method) Platinum sustainability rating. Located on a hilltop overlooking Sai Kung Bay, the Shaw Auditorium will serve as a gateway to the university campus and a hub where academic and student life intersects. The building consists of three concentric rings stacked together to optimize panoramic views of the landscape through walls of glass that illuminate the interior with natural lighting. The facade will be painted white to reflect sunlight; the stacked rings are slightly offset to create balconies that double as sunshades . “Our design aims to become an example of a sustainable subtropical architecture, hopefully influencing the construction industry in this region to design with more consideration to our climate,” Partner and Design Principal at Henning Larsen, Claude Bøjer Godefroy explains. “We also aimed to create the most transformative and innovative auditorium in this region to match the reputation of the University, and to make sure the venue will be lively at all times.” Related: Hong Kong’s “greenest school” champions environmental stewardship Shaw Auditorium’s modular seating can be adapted to fit a variety of programs and is able to seat 850 to up to 1,300 visitors, while the hall can also be turned into a large flat floor area. As a result, the auditorium can take on different “modes” and morph from its default “Learning Commons” setup to accommodate concerts, conferences, theater productions, banquet halls, exhibitions and congregations. The curved auditorium walls can even be used as a 360-degree projection screen for an immersive audio-visual experience. The building also includes auxiliary classroom spaces, public furniture and an integrated cafe. The project is slated for completion in 2021. + Henning Larsen Images via Henning Larsen

Go here to see the original: 
Henning Larsen breaks ground on BEAM Platinum-targeted Shaw Auditorium in Hong Kong

Carnival Corporation is polluting oceans while on probation

April 23, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Carnival Corporation is polluting oceans while on probation

The popular cruise liner Carnival was charged in 2016 for excess ocean pollution, yet the company is still breaking U.S. laws. New court findings show that Carnival’s fleet of cruise ships have dumped more than half of a million gallons of oil, sewage and food waste into the ocean from April 2017 to April 2018. Carnival is currently on probation for violating ocean pollution standards and is being monitored for any further violations. Between the springs of 2017 and 2018, the company had as many as 800 events related to illegal dumping of materials and substances. According to the Miami Herald , many of the incidents were not intentional and involved things like furniture items accidentally being dumped overboard. Related: Plastic pollution is causing reproductive problems for ocean wildlife But around 24 of the reports were related to sewage , oil or food dumping. An additional 19 of the incidents involved burning fuel in areas that have been deemed protected zones. The company reported the events either in official log books or to authorities. Although Carnival clearly has improvements to make, the report of findings praised the company for being cooperative with authorities, both on shore and on board the vessels. Carnival has also implemented measures to cut down on future violations, which is at least a step in the right direction. One area that needs significant improvement is Carnival’s flawed system for internal investigations. The study found that Carnival needs to give more power to its compliance manager, Chris Donald, who was appointed by the courts to oversee environmental issues . Without proper authority, Donald has little influence over making policy changes that affect the whole company. After being convicted for large-scale pollution in 2016, Carnival promised to pay $40 million in fines and remain on probation for five years. For reference, the company made over $3.2 billion in profits last year. The company is currently in its second year of probation, and court filings continue to show violations of environmental law. Via Miami Herald Image via Carnival Corporation

View original post here: 
Carnival Corporation is polluting oceans while on probation

This beekeepers workshop uses sustainable design to minimize its footprint

April 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on This beekeepers workshop uses sustainable design to minimize its footprint

In a bid to save northern Brazil’s rainforests from deforestation and land exploitation, São Paulo-based architecture firm Estudio Flume has recently completed Casa do Mel, a beekeepers workshop that serves as a self-sustainable business alternative to logging operations. Located in the Canaã dos Carajás in the Pará Estate of Brazil, the workshop serves a co-operative of beekeepers formed by 53 rural producers. To reduce site impact, the building follows passive solar principles and incorporates a variety of sustainable strategies such as a bio-digester and a rainwater harvesting system. Set on a steeply sloped site, Casa do Mel deftly navigates the 23-foot height difference with a concrete slab suspended on piers, a more cost-effective solution to the more conventional ground works approach. Elevating the building also helps to naturally ventilate the interior; the raised double-layered roof (slab and corrugated metal sheeting) and perforated walls made of concrete blocks backed with insect mesh also bring cooling cross-breezes into the workspace. The long roof overhang provides shade and protection from the harsh Brazilian sun. “The orientation of the Casa do Mel was designed with consideration to the local climate, prioritizing the thermal comfort and natural lighting of the workspace,” the architects explain of the 2,583-square-foot building. “The most permanent premises, such as the container and process rooms for honey, were located facing East to get the early morning sunlight.” Related: Flow Hive lets beekeepers harvest honey without disturbing the bees To responsibly handle gray water , the architects planted a circle of banana trees (Circulo de bananeiras) that uses the root system to treat the water and prevent soil contamination. Organic waste is treated in a bio-digester where it is turned into fertilizer and organic compost. The butterfly roof helps facilitate the collection of rainwater, which is used for non-potable uses such as flushing toilets. + Estudio Flume Images via Estudio Flume

Original post: 
This beekeepers workshop uses sustainable design to minimize its footprint

People for Bikes is making cycling safer with Ride Spot

April 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on People for Bikes is making cycling safer with Ride Spot

People for Bikes is doing its part to make  cycling safe. The non-profit organization now has two networking projects to help keep cyclists safe across the country: a city ratings database and a guide on the best city biking routes called Ride Spot. With safety being a top priority, People for Bikes  works diligently to urge cities to make it safer for people to ride bikes, whether for commuting or just for enjoying the ride. The non-profit’s database ranks cities based on cycling safety and community. Per the ratings map, the best place to ride a bike is Fort Collins, Colorado. Some of the worst places for cyclists, meanwhile, include cities in North Dakota, Missouri, Louisiana and Hawaii. Fortunately, People for Bikes is currently lobbying for these areas to pass  legislation  that promotes road safety. Related: How to make American cities bike-friendly The company has also started a program called Ride Spot , which features the best bike routes based on location. The routes are user-generated with help from local cyclists and owners of bike shops. People can use the app to find the safest routes in cities all across the United States. The company strongly encourages bike shops to contribute data to its platform, as they often know which areas of town feature the best routes. In addition to showing routes, the app also connects users with each other. In fact, cyclists can use the program to share stories about their daily commutes and new routes they have discovered as well as upload photos of their journeys. As more people get involved, Ride Spot could become a viable place for riders to share information on safe and recreational urban  cycling . People for Bikes hopes its new initiative will address three major issues many beginning cyclists face: knowing the safest routes, connecting with other riders and getting past the intimidation factor. + People for Bikes Via TreeHugger Image via Pexels

Excerpt from: 
People for Bikes is making cycling safer with Ride Spot

Daniel Libeskind unveils climate change-inspired sculptures at Paleis Het Loo

April 11, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Daniel Libeskind unveils climate change-inspired sculptures at Paleis Het Loo

This spring, tapestry-like shrubbery and geometric flowerbeds won’t be the only highlights at the Het Loo Palace’s Dutch Baroque gardens. The palatial grounds in Apeldoorn, Netherlands recently opened a new climate change-inspired exhibit, ‘The Garden of Earthly Worries,’ featuring four monumental art installations designed by Polish-American architect Daniel Libeskind . The exhibit showcases the first-ever contemporary installations on show in the gardens of Paleis Het Loo, which dates back to the late 17th century. ‘The Garden of Earthly Worries’ opened April 2, 2019 and will remain on display at the palace until mid-2021. Architect Daniel Libeskind of the New York-based Studio Libeskind is best known for his avant-garde buildings. His best-known portfolio pieces typically pertain to the arts and museums; however, he also famously won the competition to design the masterplan for the reconstruction of the World Trade Center in New York. In addition to architectural work, Libeskind has also created furnishings, fixtures, sculptures and even opera sets. Libeskind’s ‘The Garden of Earthly Worries’ consists of four abstract sculptures that “explore the imbalance of humankind in nature,” according to Studio Libeskind. “Each of the approximately 3-meter-tall fragments of a globe represent different chemical compounds that contribute to our changing climate . Conceived as a sculptural and conceptual counterpoint to the ordered beauty of the palace garden, the gardens of the 17th century represent a perceived paradise, man’s perfection of nature. But, due to technology and human intervention, our current planet is rapidly changing.” Related: Daniel Libeskind unveils twisted, tree-covered skyscraper for Toulouse Considered one of the most popular museums in the Netherlands, Museum Paleis Het Loo comprises a grand palace where the House of Orange-Nassau once lived, the symmetrical baroque gardens, the Stables Square and the palace park. The museum, which opened to the public in the 1980s after an extensive renovation, is now undergoing another major renovation and renewal slated for completion in 2021. Stables Square and the garden are open from April to September. + Daniel Libeskind Images via Studio Libeskind

See the original post:
Daniel Libeskind unveils climate change-inspired sculptures at Paleis Het Loo

LEED Platinum fire station is powered with solar energy in Seattle

April 11, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on LEED Platinum fire station is powered with solar energy in Seattle

The north end of Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood has recently become home to a new, contemporary fire station that’s also a beacon for sustainability. Certified LEED Platinum, Fire Station 22 was designed by local architectural practice Weinstein A+U to harvest solar power, as well as rainwater , which is used for all of the station’s non-potable water uses. The building also has an enhanced civic presence with a super-scaled and illuminated “22” on its facade and large walls of glass that invite the neighborhood in. Due to its location on a long and narrow corner lot confined by two freeways and a heavily trafficked road, Fire Station 22 forgoes the conventional back-in configuration in favor of a drive-through layout for better visibility and safety. However, this configuration and the constraints of the space meant that the two-story support and crew spaces needed to be put at the front of the site, thus blocking views of the fire station’s apparatus bay, which has always traditionally been visible to the public. To reengage the community, the architects added a public plaza at the main entry, a super-scaled “22” sign on the concrete hose-drying tower and a glazed lobby and station office. “The station needs to mediate this complex site while maintaining rigorous programmatic requirements and balancing users’ desire for privacy,” said the architects , who completed the project as the last full-building replacement project under the 2003 Fire Facilities and Emergency Response Levy. “It does so with a sculptural facade along E. Roanoke Street, which provides privacy for the building’s users while creating pedestrian interest and texture. The station opens up to the future 520 Lid at the northeast corner, with a fully glazed lobby, the iconic Apparatus Bay egress doors, and a hose tower that acts as a landmark on the singular site.” Related: LEED Platinum fire station boosts firefighter wellness in Seattle Built to meet current program standards, Fire Station 22 features highly efficient mechanical and plumbing systems in addition to a solar PV system and rainwater harvesting systems. The project has earned three 2018 AIA Merit Awards. + Weinstein A+U Images by Lara Swimmer

See the original post here:
LEED Platinum fire station is powered with solar energy in Seattle

Stanfords sustainable scholars building embraces the California landscape

March 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Stanfords sustainable scholars building embraces the California landscape

A former parking lot has been converted into the Denning House , the new home for the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program at Stanford University. The University and the Denning Family tapped New York City-based architectural firm Ennead Architects to design the building as a gathering place for graduate scholars hailing from international backgrounds and diverse disciplines. Wrapped in timber and surrounded by California oaks, the Denning House has a treehouse-like atmosphere and sustainably embraces the landscape by minimizing site impact, tapping into natural ventilation and using bird-friendly glass to reduce bird collisions while improving solar performance. Located at the edge of Lake Lagunita and surrounded by a dense forested landscape, the Denning House design draws inspiration from its site surroundings. Hidden in the trees, the 18,000-square-foot building features a Douglas fir wood structure that’s clad in cypress with interiors lined in Douglas fir. The exposed wood, expansive glazing, and open-floor plan makes the indoor environment feel seamlessly connected with the outdoors. The building has also been designed for optimal views of Lake Lagunita. The large public spaces, such as the dining areas, classrooms and lounges are located on the second floor to take full advantage of spectacular lake vistas. The shallow arcing facade also gives way to a continuous outdoor deck from where views of the lake can be enjoyed. Meanwhile, the ground floor is given over to administration, conference and back-of-house facilities. Related: Heroic Food Farm gives military veterans a new mission as farmers growing sustainable food “It is a very environmentally immersive site,” said Emily Kirkland, the project architect and project manager. “The building was designed to respect and enhance the symbiotic relationship between visitor and nature, and by virtue of its minimal footprint, help to restore the native landscape.” To further reduce the building’s site impact, the Denning House is set on recessed footings to conserve and intensify native vegetation and is accessed via a gently curving, sloping boardwalk. + Ennead Architects Images by Tim Griffith

Read the original here: 
Stanfords sustainable scholars building embraces the California landscape

Analysis of Wikipedia searches reveals high wildlife conservation trends

March 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Analysis of Wikipedia searches reveals high wildlife conservation trends

A recent study analyzed billions of Wikipedia searches and found that the public’s interest in plants and animal species is often linked to the seasonality and migration patterns of wildlife. The findings contribute to a body of research that uses internet search data to understand and gauge the public’s interest in environmental topics. Researchers believe this information can ultimately help guide more effective wildlife conservation campaigns. The study: Wikipedia searches and species The study, led by John Mittermeier, an ornithology student at the University of Oxford, was published on March 5 in the  PLOS Biology journal. It analyzed 2.3 billion Wikipedia page views of 32,000 different species. The authors examined pages across 245 different languages over a span of three years. The study’s most pertinent finding shows that over a fourth of all page views were linked to the seasonality of the searched-for species . The authors concluded that this means that people are paying attention to the plants and animals around them, despite the widening disconnect between people and nature. According to Mittermeier, each page could count as a human-wildlife interaction, “if you count a click as an interaction”. Although “clicks” are debatable as an interaction, it is true that people are increasingly disconnected with nature in many parts of the urbanized world. The study’s authors are hopeful that this knowledge of seasonal interest can turn into support for wildlife conservation . Related: IKEA teams up with London artists to upcycle old furniture into funky abodes for birds, bees, ?and bats Searches and Seasonality The study found that searches for particular species peaked during certain seasons or times of migration . For example, searches for Baltimore Orioles were higher in the Spring when the birds migrate to breeding grounds. Searches for flowering plants were also higher during times when flowers were in bloom, whereas searches for evergreen plants like pine trees had no correlation to season. “The results of this study…encouragingly suggest that humans remain attuned to the seasonal dynamics of the natural world,” Mittermeier explained. The authors also noted cultural trends in the searches. For example, searches for Great White Sharks rose during the Discovery Chanel’s Shark Week. Mittermeier and the co-authors believe the study will help explain important questions, such as “how is the world changing, for which species is it changing the most and where are the people who care the most and can do the most to help?” Similar internet-search studies There are a number of other studies that have examined the ties between internet searches and environmental topics. In fact, this body of research is part of an emerging field called “conservation culturomics,” which uses digital trend data to understand public support for and interest in the environment. One similar study examined Google searches on environmental topics since 2004, particularly testing linkages between ‘conservation’ and ‘ climate change ‘ and the competition between those two searches within the public’s “limited bandwidth” for environmental topics. Although the authors originally believed climate change would overpower conservation and biodiversity searches,  findings reveal that both topics are closely linked and that searches for the two were about equal. Remarkably, the data also revealed a drastic increase in interest in conservation and climate change among populations in India, Nepal, and Eastern and Southern African countries. Another study suggests that spikes in wildlife conservation searches occur around the publication of news articles on similar topics, however, such peaks are not associated with the publication of research studies. This discovery shows the critical importance of the media for conservation and climate change awareness and suggests that conservation organizations should look to strengthen partnerships with journalists and media channels as complementary to their investments in scientific research. Still, different  study on internet searches for endangered wildlife species revealed that the general public is far too focused on endangered mammals, while equally important and threatened fish and reptiles receive little attention and therefore very few searches. Again, this study concluded that more media attention must be given to lesser-known and often less-charismatic species in order to peak public support for their protection. All of the studies’ authors are quick to point out that though the use of internet searches is a great and inexpensive way to read the pulse of the general public and understand their curiosities; interest does not equate to support, and conservation organizations must use the new information to turn curiosities into financial and political action. Via Monga Bay Image via Dave_E

Original post: 
Analysis of Wikipedia searches reveals high wildlife conservation trends

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1770 access attempts in the last 7 days.