Architect makes playful puzzle pavilion for Design Week Mexico

January 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

At the 11th annual Design Week Mexico, Mexican architect Gerardo Broissin created the Egaligilo Pavilion, an eye-catching structure made with large jigsaw puzzle-shaped concrete pieces. Installed on the grounds of Mexico City’s contemporary art museum Museo Tamayo, the boxy pavilion draws the eye with its puzzle-inspired form and bubble-like protrusions designed to deliberately obscure views of the interior. Inside is a lush garden that remains exposed to the outdoor elements thanks to small slits and perforations cut into the pavilion on all sides. Installed last year at the beginning of October, Broissin’s Egaligilo Pavilion builds upon Design Week Mexico’s tradition of using architecture and design to spur thought-provoking conversations. The basis for the Egaligilo Pavilion begins with the teachings of French philosopher Michel Foucault, particularly how the discovery of self is centered on a state of constant questioning. Broissin explores this “principle of agitation” by designing a space that juxtaposes seemingly opposite elements, from the inclusion of both traditional and parametric architecture to the concepts of the artificial and the natural. For instance, the rectangular pavilion’s puzzle piece-shaped panels seem to suggest rigidity and order but are contrasted with the bubble-like dome protrusions and further undermined by the interior’s curved walls. A large circular opening marks one end of the pavilion and provides the only view inside of the structure, which houses a surprisingly lush garden with a mulch ground. Related: This prefab weekend retreat made from shipping containers can be ordered online “The Egaligilo’s external structure remains light weighted and displays shape contrasts, it holds a living oasis inside, in which symbolism is exalted and gives the visitor the capacity to assume a new role, to reinvent him/herself following Foucault,” Broissin said in the project statement. “A space that originally should have been outside is held on to walls that are capriciously opened to light, but can’t be penetrated by the gaze. This quality demands the visitor to immerse in space, and once again, creates a tension between the limit of the public and the private.” + Gerardo Broissin Images via Gerardo Broissin

Read more here: 
Architect makes playful puzzle pavilion for Design Week Mexico

Passive solar community in Brazil combines social justice and sustainability

January 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

To empower a marginalized community in Brazil’s Maranhão state, São Paulo-based architecture firm  Estudio Flume  has completed Castanha de Caju, a new headquarters for a women’s agricultural cooperative that doubles as a welcoming community hub. Constructed on a limited budget and a tight timeline, the inspiring project included the refurbishment and extension of a small house as well as the inclusion of traditional construction techniques and materials to reduce costs. Low-cost passive thermal control strategies and considerable community input helped shape the project, which also includes permaculture principles, a biodigester, and rainwater harvesting. Located in Nova Vida, a small impoverished community in Bom Jesus das Selvas, the new agricultural co-op headquarters was primarily built to serve a group of women who make their living by collecting and processing a type of oil-rich Brazilian nut. As a result, the layout of the building was informed by the co-op’s workflows and includes nut cooking and breaking areas as well as an internal courtyard for drying foods. In light of the lack of  public spaces in the town, the architects also added facilities to the project, such as the sun-room and concrete bunch, to encourage community cohesion and knowledge sharing. In addition to  reusing  as much of the original building as possible, the new headquarters is constructed with perforated bricks and ‘brise-soleil’ pivot doors made with traditional techniques to allow for cross ventilation, natural light, and views. Since the area lacks a sewage system and a constant supply of potable water, the architects added a rainwater harvesting system and a septic tank biodigester for sewage treatment as well as a banana circle to filter gray water. The architects hope that through continued use and maintenance, the community will gradually begin to adapt these systems into other buildings in the town. Related: This beekeepers workshop uses sustainable design to minimize its footprint “This project is part of a wider plan for renovation works for small cooperatives and associations in the interior Maranhão and Pará states, in the north and northeast of Brazil ,” the architects said. “In a country with enormous continental diversity and cultural richness, it represents the opportunity to defend some sense of social justice, to ensure job security, comfort in the routine of a group of women. This was an opportunity to work with those who produce food on a small scale and with respect for the environment and, in the end, these products are eaten in the big cities.” + Estudio Flume Images via Estudio Flume

Originally posted here: 
Passive solar community in Brazil combines social justice and sustainability

Snhetta to revitalize Midtown Manhattan with vibrant garden

January 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Midtown Manhattan will soon become much greener thanks to New York City Planning Commission’s unanimous approval of Snøhetta’s design for a new privately-owned public space (POPS) in 550 Madison, a Philip Johnson-designed postmodernist landmark. Designed as a “vibrant sensory retreat,” the new public space will take the shape of a lush garden — the largest of its kind in the area — that will become a haven for both people and urban pollinators. The garden is being developed as part of the recent renovation of 550 Madison, which will open this year as a multi-tenant building under The Olayan Group. This structure will be the only LEED Platinum and WELL Gold certified building in the Plaza District. Proposed for the west end of the tower, the 550 Madison garden will engage the public with a series of interconnected outdoor “rooms.” The landscape design takes inspiration from its urban surroundings and architecture. Philip Johnson’s playful use of circular motifs at 550 Madison will inform the geometry of the garden rooms, while the layered planting plan references the canyon-like verticality of Midtown Manhattan. The lush circular rooms will encourage passersby to slow down, linger, and connect with nature. “Privately-owned public spaces are a critical part of New York City’s public realm. Urban life thrives in and around spaces that allow us to connect with one another and to nature,” said Michelle Delk, Partner and Director of Landscape Architecture at Snøhetta. “Moreover, we need to make the most of the spaces we already have and recognize that they are part of a network that contribute to the livelihood of the city. We’re thrilled to be a part of renewing the future of this historic site.” Related: Philip Johnson’s secret brick and glass home in Manhattan, NYC The immersive green respite will comprise a seasonal Northeastern planting palette that will include evergreens, perennials and flowering shrubs. Over 40 trees will be planted in the space. An enormous glass canopy will flood the interior with natural daylight . The architects will also install a central water wall as a point of interest and noise buffer from the commotion of the neighborhood. Informational signage will punctuate the space and provide details about the site’s environmental and cultural history. + Snøhetta Via ArchPaper Images via Snøhetta

Read the original: 
Snhetta to revitalize Midtown Manhattan with vibrant garden

3XN unveils new, sustainable building for UNSW Sydney

January 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 3XN unveils new, sustainable building for UNSW Sydney

Following a rigorous international competition, Danish architectural firm 3XN has won the bid to design the University of New South Wales’ (UNSW) new Multipurpose Building — a project that the architects say will have a “focus on resilience and environmental sustainability.” Proposed for the northeast gate (Gate 9) of the UNSW main Kensington campus in Sydney, the Multipurpose Building will serve as a vibrant campus gateway close to a soon-to-open light rail station. The building will emphasize healthy indoor environments with carefully chosen materials, passive cooling, and ample daylighting. The UNSW Multipurpose Building marks the first Australian educational facility project for 3XN, which is continually expanding its portfolio abroad. Conceived as the heart of the UNSW campus, the building design combines a tower element with horizontal massing to create an L-shaped volume that’s made all the more distinctive by a staggered facade. “Our concept for this building is really special in that it offers a new  learning environment  for interdisciplinary collaboration and inspiration,” Stig Vesterager Gothelf, Architect MAA and Partner in Charge at 3XN in Copenhagen, said in a project statement. “Students will be able to observe and learn from each other in new ways, thanks to the open design concept used throughout.” Related: BIG’s LEED Gold-seeking school in Arlington features a cascade of green terraces Given the building’s proximity to a planned light rail station, the project will include a large plaza and green space to accommodate increased  pedestrian traffic . Inside, the building will include six distinct teaching and learning environments, common student facilities, event and exhibition space, workplaces, supporting and ancillary facilities and additional amenities. Using passive solar strategies, the design will also aim to minimize the building’s energy use, water use and maintenance costs. + 3XN Images via 3XN

Read the original post:
3XN unveils new, sustainable building for UNSW Sydney

This lovely lampshade is made from cabbage

January 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This lovely lampshade is made from cabbage

Lighting can set the tone of a room, so a lamp with a natural and compostable lampshade can create a cozy, gorgeous and sustainable setting. In a partnership between Indian designer Vaidehi Thakkar and London-based Nir Meiri Studio, Veggie Lights are just that — lampshades made out of red cabbage leaves that lend a warm glow to any space. A testament to the duo’s dedication to exploring and highlighting sustainable options, Veggie Lights offer a useful and elegant decor option straight from the garden. To create the lampshades, Thakkar developed the process of converting vegetables into a paper-like substance called Fiber Flats. Meiri joined the project with a passion for using organic materials, as seen from previous successes in using both mycelium and seaweed to make lampshades. Related: Algae Lamps are a work of art and natural shade in one Each lampshade in the Veggie Lights line is unique, a result of the natural variations in the leaves. Cabbage leaves may not be in the spotlight for intrinsic beauty, but through the process of separating the leaves and soaking them in a water-based color preservative, the originality of each leaf begins to shine through. The leaves are then shaped and left to dry in high temperatures, so all of the moisture evaporates. At this point, the leaves are either left unfinished, or the edges are trimmed and contoured into a gentle downward curve. The design of Veggie Lights places the bulb and electrical parts in a simple and streamlined base. This allows the light to shine upward into the shade, illuminating the natural veins and color variations in the cabbage leaf. Because the lampshades are naturally biodegradable, they will age and are meant to eventually be replaced. However, the base is long-lasting, so you can replace the shade at the end of its life for a refreshed look without producing waste . + Nir Meiri Studio + Vaidehi Thakkar Via Dezeen Image via Nir Meiri Studios

Read the rest here:
This lovely lampshade is made from cabbage

California winery innovates with sustainable recycling creation

January 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on California winery innovates with sustainable recycling creation

In the California city of West Paso Robles, architecture firm Clayton & Little has given old oil field drill stem pipes unexpected new life — as an equipment barn that offsets over 100% of the energy needs for a sustainably-minded winery. Covered with a photovoltaic roof, the Saxum Vineyard Equipment Barn is not only self-sufficient, but also champions environmentally friendly design principles that include material reuse , rainwater collection and responsible stormwater management practices. The simple agricultural storage structure was strategically placed at the property’s vineyard-lined entrance as an icon of the winery’s commitment to sustainability. Located in the Templeton Gap area at the foot of the 50-acre James Berry Vineyard, the Saxum Vineyard Equipment Barn was constructed with a frame made from reclaimed oil field drill stem pipes. Along with timber and welded WT steel flitch purlins, the pipe structure supports a series of laminated glass solar modules that provide shelter and serve as the solar system capable of producing a third more power than needed — roughly 87,000 kWh per year. The pipe framing has also been fitted with a gutter system to accommodate future rainwater harvesting . In addition to offsetting all of the winery’s power demands, the minimalist building provides covered open-air storage for farming vehicles, livestock supplies and workshop and maintenance space. The salvaged pipes were left to weather naturally and are complemented with 22 gauge Western Rib Cor-Ten corrugated perforated steel panels for added shade and filtered privacy to equipment bays. Pervious gravel paving was installed for all open vehicle storage bays and livestock pens to return rainwater to the watershed. Related: Old ruins are transformed into a cozy, off-grid guesthouse in France “ Salvaged materials do more with less,” the architects explained in a press statement. “Barn doors are clad in weathered steel off-cuts that were saved for reuse from the adjacent winery shoring walls, re-used in a ‘calico’ pattern to fit the oddly shaped panels to tube steel framed door leafs. Storage boxes are skinned with stained cedar siding with the interiors clad with unfinished rotary cut Douglas Fir plywood.” + Clayton & Little Images by Casey Dunn

See the original post:
California winery innovates with sustainable recycling creation

White, latticed exoskeleton wraps a LEED Platinum office in Madrid

December 23, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on White, latticed exoskeleton wraps a LEED Platinum office in Madrid

On the side of a large roundabout in Madrid, Spanish architecture firm Rafael de La-Hoz has realized the eye-catching Oxxeo project, a five-story office building with a LEED Platinum Core & Shell certification . The energy-efficient building makes the most of its wedge-shaped plot with an asymmetrical, three-sided design, of which the geometry is emphasized with the building’s three large-scale, lattice facades with a white, rhomboidal pattern. In addition to creating greater visual interest for Oxxeo, the sculptural facade also helps mitigate unwanted solar gain. Spanning an area of 14,299 square meters, the Oxxeo office building was created with efficiency in mind, from the efficient use of energy to the smart use of space. The building’s double facade includes a glass curtain wall that floods the interior with natural light and reduces reliance on artificial lighting, while the latticed exoskeleton provides solar shading . For flexibility in the floor plan, the architects located supporting pillars inside the vertical core and in the chamfered corners to maximize the seemingly pillar-free office space. Related: This is one of the only LEED Gold-certified hotels in Spain “This building has no other concept idea than the one shown in its own construction,” Rafael de La-Hoz explained in a project statement. “This way, it is the structure, or rather the construction of its structure, or the details of the facade, or the knots and joints which generate its architectural form, or the concept.” The intersecting points for the rhomboidal lattice are spaced out at every 8.1 meters and serve as the supporting elements for the perimeters of the slabs. The corners of each rhomboid are curved to soften the facade’s appearance. The minimalist exterior is matched by a clean interior design. The building is also topped with a green roof . + Rafael de La-Hoz arquitectos Photography by Alfonso Quiroga and David Frutos via Rafael de La-Hoz arquitectos

Go here to read the rest: 
White, latticed exoskeleton wraps a LEED Platinum office in Madrid

Low-impact Thai home uses modular design to harmonize with nature

December 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Low-impact Thai home uses modular design to harmonize with nature

Thai architectural firm TA-CHA Design has recently completed the Binary Wood House, a second home for a Bangkokian family of five that emphasizes environmentally friendly design. Located on a hill in Pak Chong in northeastern Thailand, the home was carefully sited to preserve existing Siamese Rosewood trees and is elevated to reduce site impact. To create a seamless indoor-outdoor living experience, the architects employed a modular design, designating each 3.4-meter module as either a “0 (unoccupied/open space)” or a “1 (occupied/close space)” in a binary system that also gave rise to the project’s name.  Spread out across 600 square meters, the Binary Wood House was initially meant to serve as an Airbnb or private resort but later morphed into a second home for the clients with room for their soon-to-retire parents. To lessen site impact, the architects opted to design the home with a metal structure clad in wood paneling instead of concrete. Approximately 80 percent of the wood used in construction was reclaimed . Local craftsmen were hired for the woodworking, which takes inspiration from the region’s traditional “Korat” houses. Related: Reclaimed materials star in this surf villa with ocean views in Bali “Throughout the entire design project of the house, there has been one and only core value on which the owner and the designers agree — to always hold the predecessors in high regard,” the architects said. “In other words, the house exists to respect those who came before, whether they be neighbors, local people, local animals and local trees.” In addition to elevating the home off the ground, the property reduces its environmental footprint by relying on natural cooling instead of air conditioning. Surrounded by covered terraces, the indoor-outdoor living areas feature operable shutters that let in cooling winds, while the preserved trees help mitigate unwanted solar gain. A reflecting pond was also added to increase moisture in the house. + TA-CHA Studio Photography by Beersingnoi via TA-CHA Studio

See more here: 
Low-impact Thai home uses modular design to harmonize with nature

Study reveals "ugly sweaters" add to the plastic pollution problem

December 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Study reveals "ugly sweaters" add to the plastic pollution problem

Many Americans attend ugly Christmas sweater parties. But in Britain, there’s even an annual Christmas Jumper [another term for “sweater”] Day that fuels the trade in hideous holiday garb. Now, research by the environmental charity Hubbub blames ugly sweaters as yet another contributor to the plastic pollution crisis. The study found that one in three adults under 35 buys a new holiday sweater every year, but two in five of these sweaters are worn only once over the holiday season. Three-quarters of the sweaters Hubbub tested revealed at least some plastic in the material, with 44 percent being entirely made of acrylic, a plastic fiber. A study by Plymouth University concluded that acrylic releases nearly 730,000 microfibers per wash, which is five times more than poly-cotton blends. Related: 17 easy ways to upcycle worn out sweaters “We don’t want to stop people dressing up and having a great time at Christmas, but there are so many ways to do this without buying new,” Sarah Divall, the project coordinator at Hubbub, told The Guardian. “ Fast fashion is a major threat to the natural world, and Christmas jumpers are problematic as so many contain plastic. We’d urge people to swap, buy secondhand or rewear, and remember a jumper is for life, not just for Christmas.” Hubbub estimates that retailers will sell 12 million new holiday sweaters this year, even though 65 million Christmas jumpers are already stowed in U.K. wardrobes. Why not swap with family, friends, housemates or workmates? Host a craft night with friends to refurbish an old sweater using pompoms, sequins, strings of lights or bits recycled from other clothes to create your own look. Christmas Jumper Day is not only a tradition that many Brits enjoy; it’s also a fundraiser for Save the Children, which fights child poverty and hunger. Luckily, participants can still donate to the cause and also upcycle an old sweater rather than buying a new one to fight plastic pollution. + Hubbub Via The Guardian Image via Shutterstock

See more here: 
Study reveals "ugly sweaters" add to the plastic pollution problem

Carney Logan Burke thoughtfully inserts a modernist jewel in Jackson Hole

November 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Carney Logan Burke thoughtfully inserts a modernist jewel in Jackson Hole

After over twenty years of working with a family on their 180-acre Jackson Hole property, Montana architectural firm Carney Logan Burke has capped their fruitful relationship with the Queens Lane Pavilion, a modernist two-bedroom retreat with spectacular landscape views. Topped with a flat roof and surrounded by walls of glass, the minimalist pavilion was crafted as“art piece” that seamlessly blends into the landscape and the fifth project completed in the wildlife-rich riverine ecosystem. Architect Eric Logan designed all five buildings on the property; a Parkitecture-influenced stone-and-timber lodge that anchors the property; a transitional-style office/ shop; a sculptural weathered steel -clad wine silo that mimics classic agrarian forms; a covered bridge; and finally, the Queens Lane Pavilion, a modernist glass building. Built to replace an existing structure, the newest addition follows the exact footprint of its predecessor to meet the minimum setback requirements. The architects worked with Teton County in a two-year planning process to ensure the new-build would minimize disturbance to wildlife, waterways and trees. “The structure relates to its neighbors, yet inhabits its own micro-ecosystem on the property; the owners’ two decades of habitat enhancement projects has created a thriving fishery and miniature wildlife refuge frequented by elk, eagles, moose, deer and coyotes,” explain the architects in a project statement. “The influence of the water, the protection of the cottonwoods, and the simplicity of the building (from a distance, it is perceived as one line in the landscape) align in a special moment on the property. This serene glass pavilion — modernist wildlife viewing blind during the day, luminous lantern amidst the trees at night, comfortable retreat at all hours — is a fitting tribute to that moment.” Related: Wyoming architects convert former hayloft into light-filled guest home While the lodge houses necessities such as laundry, the pavilion serves purely as a retreat for enjoying nature. The L-shaped building contains a garage on the shorter end and has a long section with two bedrooms and a spacious open-plan living area, kitchen, and dining room. A natural material palette and walls of glass blur the distinction between indoors and out. Perforated metal sheets inspired by the surrounding cottonwood grove modulate views and provide protection from the sun, as do the deep protective roof overhangs. + Carney Logan Burke Photography: Matthew Millman

Read more here: 
Carney Logan Burke thoughtfully inserts a modernist jewel in Jackson Hole

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1438 access attempts in the last 7 days.