This highly insulated modular home is completely self-sustaining

January 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Going off grid isn’t just for solo meditative retreats—nowadays you can comfortably bring the whole family along. Australian firm Modscape recently completed their latest custom modular build called Franklinford, an off-grid residence in Victoria, Australia. Shared between two families, this four-bedroom home is completely self-sustaining with its own solar system and 80,000-liter water tank. Set in an open farmland in Victoria’s Central Highlands, Franklinford takes design cues from nearby agricultural buildings with its no-nonsense metal and timber palette. Its east-facing facade seen from the approach is faced with radially sawn timber board-and-battern siding. Durable Colorbond steel clads the rest of the exterior that’s accented with Vitrabond aluminum. Oriented to capture winter sun, the low-lying rural retreat’s highly insulated shell is constructed from SIPs and thermally broken, low-e glazing to minimize temperature fluctuations. Related: Solar-Powered Modular Cabin Exists Completely Off-the-Grid in Australia The interior features whitewashed walls set against dark oak timber floors for a clean and minimalist effect. A large living wing forms the home’s focal point and is wrapped in floor-to-ceiling glazing that opens up to a north-facing L-shaped timber deck. The communal area leads to the four bedrooms via a long hallway. A nearby metal-clad shed houses the solar system and a large 80,000-liter water tank. + Modscape Images by John Madden

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This highly insulated modular home is completely self-sustaining

Heritage-listed church repurposed into modern solar-powered home in Brisbane

January 16, 2018 by  
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Brisbane-based architecture studio DAHA merged old and new with the Church House, an eye-catching modern home and adaptive reuse project. The unusual combination attaches a sleek structure of concrete, steel, and glass to a brick church, known as the Church of Figuration that was built in 1924. While the church’s position wasn’t moved, the architects carefully positioned the new-build based on climatic site conditions and to optimize passive heating and cooling and conditions for a photovoltaic solar array and water harvesting. The Church of Figuration was originally purchased as part of a $2.4million AUD hillside property in Norman Park, the sale came with the condition that the heritage-listed Church of Transfiguration be preserved . Thus, the architects kept the church as the property’s focal point by retaining sight lines: the heritage building is flanked by a tennis court on one side and a manicured lawn and landscape on the other. The elevated site provides sweeping views of the neighborhood. Related: Old converted church hides gorgeous modern interiors in London “The Church House extension is a sympathetic adaptation of an existing heritage church into a unique family home,” wrote the architects, who connected the church and extension with a dark zinc tunnel. “The extension responds to the grand scale and form of the existing church through robust materiality and formal gestures, creating balance between the old and the new.” Although the church’s facade has been kept intact, the interior character was changed to serve as the family’s entertainment room with a mezzanine-level home office. The extension houses three bedrooms and bathrooms. Interior designer Georgia Cannon carried out the minimalist aesthetic of cool-toned concrete, dark timber, steel, and glass. + DAHA Via ArchDaily Photos © Cathy Schusler

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Heritage-listed church repurposed into modern solar-powered home in Brisbane

Green-roofed office is the first large-scale CLT structure in southeast Europe

January 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Instead of concrete or metal, this striking eco-friendly office building in Romania features a sturdy timber skeleton in what’s claimed as the first large-scale CLT structure in southeast Europe. Romanian firm Tecto Arhitectura designed the building as the new office for HSR factory in Reci, Covasna. Designed for long-term sustainability, the office building draws on geothermal energy, uses energy-efficient technologies, and is topped by an extensive green roof. Shaped like a cross in aerial view, the HSR timber office stretches horizontally from northeast to southwest and is intersected by a two-story volume with a northwest-southeast orientation. A stairway and a double-height atrium are located at the heart of the office that accommodates around 60 people. Built to minimize thermal loss, the office is built mainly of industrially prefabricated cross-laminated timber panels and gluelam elements. Given Romania’s freezing winters, the architects inserted passive house-standard mineral wool insulation into the walls, slabs, and flat roofs and optimized solar gain in winter. Natural cross ventilation and daylighting is optimized and pass through operable triple-glazed windows and doors. Related: Nation’s first large-scale mass timber residence hall breaks ground in Arkansas Colorful aluminum cladding wraps around the building’s airtight envelope and thick CLT walls. The facade colors are echoed in the interior, as is a celebration of timber that is featured throughout. Natural lighting is optimized and complimented by LEDs. A biomass cogeneration plant provides heating and electricity for the radiant heating and cooling system, as do geothermal heat pumps and a heat recovery ventilation system. An extensive green roof covers the building. + Tecto Arhitectura Via ArchDaily Images via Tecto Arhitectura , by Cosmin Dragomir

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Green-roofed office is the first large-scale CLT structure in southeast Europe

Prefab CLT pavilion cleverly encourages dialogue at a Vancouver TED conference

January 11, 2018 by  
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An experimental pavilion popped up by the waters of downtown Vancouver for the TED2017 conference . Selected as the winning entry in the PAUSE international design competition, this interactive prefabricated timber structure explores the concept of personal space and interaction. Competition hosts nonprofit DBR | Design Build Research and the Vancouver TED2017 conference chose Kazan State University of Architecture and Engineering student Alsu Sadrieva’s submission from over 60 submissions represented by 21 different countries. PAUSE pavilion was designed to encourage passersby and conference attendees to reflect, gather, and interact. Structurlam donated the cross-laminated timber panels used for the prefabrication of the walls, while Interfor contributed dimensional lumber for the pavilion’s roof. The pavilion was weatherproofed with shrink-wrap. Related: Twin warming huts for TED conference evoke the Great Canadian Wilderness Approximately 150 stools were constructed and made from CNC-milled birch plywood topped with cushions of either preserved moss or wool felt donated by Filzfelt. The stools are inserted in the walls, making the perforated facade look as if hundreds of rods were sticking out. “The pavilion represents the thorny, challenging problems of the world today,” wrote DBR. “Chairs adorn the walls of the structure, giving it a jarring appearance. The exterior can only be smoothed by the removal of a chair – in effect solving a problem through gathering and dialogue.” The pavilion was designed for reuse after the TED2017 conference for different events in Vancouver. + DBR | Design Build Research Via ArchDaily Images via DBR | Design Build Research , © Ema Peter

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Prefab CLT pavilion cleverly encourages dialogue at a Vancouver TED conference

Spectacular Game of Thrones ice hotel opens in Finnish Lapland

January 10, 2018 by  
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Great news Game of Thrones fans—White Walkers and dragons have arrived in the one of the coolest hotels to open this winter season: The Games of Thrones-themed Lapland Hotels SnowVillage. Created in collaboration with HBO Nordic, this temporary themed hotel offers stunningly sculpted rooms made almost entirely of snow and ice . Those hoping for a visit to the Seven Kingdoms will need to hurry—the hotel will only be around until April 8, 2018. The Games of Throne-themed hotel is located in Finland’s Kittilä, about 90 minutes away from Helsinki. The hotel comprises 24 rooms, 10 of which are available to overnight guests. International ice artists were invited to bring the hotel to life and the undeniable highlight is the massive carving of a demonic White Walker looming over a bed. There’s also an icy Iron Throne, a dragon guardian at the ice bar, and a dragon-shaped ice slide. Related: Iconic Game of Thrones battle brought to life with massive 3D embroidery The ice hotel is kept at temperatures of minus five degrees Celsius. Guests who want warmer accommodation can stay in separate log cabins on site. There’s also a cinema, chapel, arctic bar, and a restaurant at the SnowVillage. Room bookings at the ice hotel start at $200 and entry to the SnowVillage is $18. + Lapland Hotels SnowVillage Via CNN Travel Images via Lapland Hotels SnowVillage

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Spectacular Game of Thrones ice hotel opens in Finnish Lapland

Smart Home targets affordability and eco-friendly design in Australia

January 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Green Sheep Collective aimed to create an affordable and highly energy efficient home with the design of Smart Home, a renovation and extension in Melbourne , Australia. Built for approximately $200 per square foot, the home is by no means a low-cost home but the price is impressive given the inclusion of high-level environmentally sustainable principles and components. In contrast to Melbourne’s many McMansions, the Smart Home is a site-specific compact home that boasts low to zero emissions, recycled materials, and connection to the outdoors. Smart Home is an expansion and renovation of a two-bedroom single-fronted Victorian cottage in inner Melbourne. Passive solar design principles guided the design and the home’s openings and room layout are optimized for natural light and ventilation. Recycled materials were used wherever possible as was ethically sourced materials like the radially sawn timbers and Flexo recycled rubber flooring. Water saving impacts were addressed with EcoVerta water saving units. Careful design and clever storage solutions with built-in furniture created 20% more usable indoor space within the 140-square-foot addition. Related: Beautiful Northcote Solar Home shows off modern energy-efficient family living “This project faced a number of critical challenges that had to be overcome in order to meet these sustainability and design targets,” wrote the architects. “The constraints included overshadowing, poor orientation, and a small 7.5 metre wide east-west block built close to the boundary. The existing home was dark and leaky with a lean-to at the rear.” The architects demolished the lean-to and added a mezzanine . “Our response creates interesting volumes for architectural beauty, and minimises idle space by ensuring the floor plan is utilised to its full capacity through clever storage solutions and split level living. The single storey addition includes open plan living, dining and kitchen opening via large openable glazed doors to an outdoor deck.” + Green Sheep Collective Images by Shae Parker McCashen

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Smart Home targets affordability and eco-friendly design in Australia

Dreamy cabin harvests rainwater and natural light for a minimal carbon footprint

January 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Nevada-based INCLINEDESIGN proves sustainable design can be beautiful in this dreamy timber cabin on Lopez Island, Washington. Available in the summer as a vacation rental, the Barn Gallery guesthouse is a showcase of eco-friendly design – from its use of reclaimed timber and metal to its elegantly crafted rainwater catchment system. Surrounded by four acres of woodland and private meadow, the guesthouse faces southwest for views of a secluded waterfront bluff. The Barn Gallery project began as a “deconstruction” of a 1970s-era home, with the designers recycling materials where possible while retaining the original building footprint. The new home’s untreated timber siding was reclaimed from the original home’s floor joists, which were milled from trees felled on the property in 1970. Corten steel frames the single-pitched roof and walls and reclaimed metal components compliment the timber palette that will naturally develop a silvery patina over time. The light-filled interior is modern and minimalist with custom artistic touches like the unique sandblasted shower glass and the copper towel warmers plumbed inline with the in-floor hot water pipes. Reclaimed timber can also be seen indoors in the form of new custom furnishings. Per its name, Barn Gallery regularly hosts rotating art exhibits featuring local artists. Related: Rammed-charcoal home is a handsome oasis between the trees To keep energy use to a minimum, the designers installed smart energy monitoring, a structural insulated panel roof, and underfloor radiant heating with heat recovery ventilation and heat pump technologies. A solar array was omitted due to budget. Rainwater is captured and filtered on-site through a rain garden and is also harvested in a large timber-clad rain barrel. + INCLINEDESIGN Via Dwell Images by Steve Horn

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Dreamy cabin harvests rainwater and natural light for a minimal carbon footprint

Google and BIG unveil designs for new green-roofed tech campus in Sunnyvale

January 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Google and BIG have teamed up for yet another massive and spectacular Google campus—this time in Sunnyvle’s Moffett Park. Google recently unveiled plans for a new BIG-designed campus last month, following the acclaimed architecture firm’s work on Google’s Mountain View and London campuses . Located on Caribbean Drive, the 1.04-million-square-foot project could accommodate 4,500 employees and feature eye-catching terraced buildings topped with accessible green roofs. Designed to foster community and healthy living, Google’s new Sunnyvale campus will be flush with green space including on its roof. Unsurprisingly, the project will target LEED Gold and is expected to rack up points through its native, low-irrigation landscape and promotion of eco-friendly transit like cycling to work. Related: Google unveils giant green ‘landscraper’ for London HQ The massive site could also accommodate more than just office space. “Housing is part of our thought process in Moffett Park,” Mark Golan, chief operating officer of Google’s global real estate investments & development unit, told The Mercury News . “A new mixed-use community where you have live-work capabilities, makes a lot of sense. Housing and transportation are two huge issues for the Valley overall, and they are huge issues for Google. One of the best ways to address this is by creating mixed-use communities that allow people to live close to where they work, which allows for a vibrant community and also helps the transportation.” The project is not expected for completion until 2021 at the earliest. + BIG Via ArchDaily Images via Google

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Google and BIG unveil designs for new green-roofed tech campus in Sunnyvale

C.F. Mllers Storkeengen tackles climate challenges in a Danish town

January 5, 2018 by  
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The modern age’s best landscape architecture projects aren’t one-trick ponies. C.F. Møller Landscape takes this to heart in their recent design for Storkeengen (Stork Meadow), a multipurpose nature park that offers recreation, beauty, and strengthened protection against storm floods. Located in the Danish town of Randers, Storkeengen aims to “resolve the city’s current and future climate chal-lenges” and bring the townspeople closer to nature and to Denmark’s longest river, the Gudenå River. Created in collaboration with Randers Vandmiljø, Randers Municipality, and Orbi-con, Storkeengen is envisioned as a pioneering project combining water purification , recreation, and climate adjustment. According to C.F. Møller, the riverside town of Randers is threatened by the effects of climate change due to its low-lying position next to the Gudenå River. Thus, the city has developed a vision to protect the town called ‘The City to the Water,’ with the implementation of Stor-keengen as the first step. The 83-hectare Storkeengen is designed to function like a wetland meadow. C.F. Møller designed “cloudburst routes” that direct stormwater runoff into the park, where it’s then naturally filtered in wetland meadow areas before being dis-charged in the river. A dyke will also be installed between the park and the river to protect the nearby residences from flooding and provide new connectivity be-tween Randers and the park. Related: Denmark just opened the “world’s most humane” maximum security prison “Storkeengen is a climate adaption project on Nature’s own terms – also when it comes to the project’s technical wastewater solutions, which are designed to strengthen the nature qualities of the wet meadows,” wrote C.F. Møller. “To in-crease accessibility and enhance the nature experi-ence, new pathways and ac-tivity plateaux are created, so that Storkeengen’s unique flora and fauna, and the wet meadows’ changing habitat, can be experienced at close hand. The plateaux also make it possible to get up close to the area’s grazing cattle, enjoy the sun-set, or navigate the Gudenå stream by canoe.” The project will break ground this fall and is slated for completion in 2021. + C.F. Møller Images via C.F. Møller

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C.F. Mllers Storkeengen tackles climate challenges in a Danish town

SLA unveils year-round ski slope to cap Copenhagens massive trash incinerator

January 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Architecture firm SLA has unveiled final designs for the much-anticipated park and ski slope that will top the currently operational Amager Bakke Waste-to-Energy Plant in Copenhagen, Denmark. BIG , which masterplanned the incredible project, is also behind some of the ski slope designs. The all-weather green roof will be open throughout the year with a variety of programming from hiking trails and climbing walls to ski slopes and viewing platform for taking in the city skyline. The 170,000-square-foot park is essentially a massive green roof , a plant-covered building system that SLA has won numerous accolades for, including the 2017 Scandinavian Green Roof Award for Copenhagen’s Mærsk Tower and SUND Nature Park. Challenges for the Amager Bakke’s multipurpose green roof include steep slopes, safety concerns, and the facility’s byproduct heat that can reach as high as 140 degrees Fahrenheit in certain areas. “The project to create an attractive and green activity rooftop park on top of Amager Bakke has been very challenging,” said SLA partner Rasmus Astrup, according to ArchDaily . “Not only because of the extreme natural – and unnatural – conditions of the site and the rooftop itself, which put severe stress on plants, trees and landscape . But also because we’ve had to ensure that the rooftop’s many activities are realized in an accessible, intuitive and inviting manner. The goal is to ensure that Amager Bakke will become an eventful recreational public space with a strong aesthetic and sensuous city nature that gives value for all Copenhageners – all year round.” Related: Denmark fires up its Copenhill power plant, with ski slopes set to open next year The rooftop park is designed to become a lush environment welcoming to a great diversity of flora and fauna. Visitors will also be able to help seed the park with seed bombs . Construction has broken ground on the Amager Bakke Rooftop Park, which is slated for completion in September 2018. + SLA Via ArchDaily Images via SLA , except where noted

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SLA unveils year-round ski slope to cap Copenhagens massive trash incinerator

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