Researchers and Indigenous groups collaborate to save caribou

October 19, 2021 by  
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Scientists are working with Indigenous communities to change the fate of Arctic caribou herds threatened by climate change. Habitat loss has caused a 56% decline in North America’s wild caribou population over the past 20 years, a situation that scientists and Indigenous conservation groups are determined to change. Recently, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded $718,000 to Logan Berner, an assistant professor at Northern Arizona University’s School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems (SICCS), for a three-year study dubbed “Fate of the Caribou.” The study offers insights into how human actions and a changing environment affect the caribou. Related: Indigenous communities are crucial in protecting the Amazon According to Berner, the study will continue to collaborate with local Indigenous groups to determine the best ways to protect the vital animals . “Our interdisciplinary research team will collaborate with members of local Indigenous and rural communities to conduct large-scale ecological analyses across multiple caribou herds in North America using novel ecological modeling, decades of satellite observations, and extensive field data,” said Berner. Berner will also collaborate with other parties to carry out interdisciplinary research to find ways of advancing the protection of wild caribou. The team includes Regents’ professor Scott Goetz, Earth scientists , ecologists, remote sensing experts and more. According to the researchers, they will be working towards generating actionable results for the management of caribou herds. “Our research will help advance understanding and management of caribou as we partner with the Indigenous-led caribou and natural resource management boards that are central to Arctic governance. We will work with them to produce actionable science that can inform the policies and co-management of caribou herds stretching from Hudson’s Bay to western Alaska,” the team wrote in a research description. Wild caribou are an important land-based species in the Arctic for both humans and the ecosystem. Those who live in the region rely on these animals for food . These animals also help balance the ecosystem. However, for the past few years, the animals have faced threats causing their population to decline. In addition to researching ways to sustain caribou populations, the researchers will also train young scientists to continue with the conservation job. Via Newswise Lead image via Pixabay

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Researchers and Indigenous groups collaborate to save caribou

United Nations rejects youth activist climate petition

October 19, 2021 by  
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The United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child declined to rule on a complaint filed by youth activists from twelve countries. The young adults claimed that Argentina, Brazil, France, Germany and Turkey have violated children’s rights by failing to control carbon emissions, despite knowing about the perils of climate change. The panel told the activists that they should have brought their cases to national courts. The self-dubbed “Children vs. the Climate Crisis” insist there’s not time for lengthy court cases; they need to take their case to the top. The youth come from twelve countries: Argentina , Brazil, France, Germany, India, Palau, Marshall Islands, Nigeria, South Africa, Sweden, Tunisia and the United States. Some countries, such as the Marshall Islands , are especially pressed for time — their chain of ancient submerged volcanoes may be under the rising seas by 2035. Related: “Climate shocks” threaten over half of Earth’s children “The truth is that I’m doing this because I feel like I haven’t been left a choice and this is the only way for me to not feel guilty,” said 18-year-old French climate activist Iris Duquesne as reported by EcoWatch. “The shame of having the possibility to do something and not doing it is too big. This is the main motivation for all youth climate activists, this and anger. Anger to feel left behind, not listened to and simply left alone.” The petition in question was filed in 2019 by 16 activists who ranged in age from eight to 17 at the time. The U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child monitors 196 signatories of a 1989 convention declaring the civil, cultural, economic and political rights of children unassailable. Of these, 48 countries agreed to allow children to take action to fix violations. The five countries named in the petition are part of this subset. Environmental and human rights attorneys from Hausfeld and Earthjustice are representing the youth activists. The lawyers said in a statement that the committee’s decision, announced October 11, “delivered a rebuke to young people around the world who are demanding immediate action on the climate crisis. In dismissing the case, the Committee told children that climate change is a dire global emergency , but the UN’s doors are closed to them.” However, the kids had some wins. The committee acknowledged that states are legally responsible for emis s ions that cause harm beyond their borders, and that the youth are indeed victims of climate-related threats to their health, life and culture. These findings could significantly influence future litigation. Via Washington Post and EcoWatch Lead image via Pexels

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British Columbia to kill nearly 200 wolves in last-ditch effort to save caribou

January 22, 2015 by  
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In a desperate attempt to save the endangered mountain caribou of British Columbia, Canada, the government there has ordered a death sentence for up to 183 grey wolves. Populations of South Selkirk mountain caribou have dwindled into the double digits, and the provincial government blames the iconic wolf species for putting the caribou in danger of extinction . Wolves are often made out to be “the bad guys” when another species is in trouble, and then targeted for killing , but there is a lot of controversy surrounding their relative guilt or innocence. Read the rest of British Columbia to kill nearly 200 wolves in last-ditch effort to save caribou Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: british columbia , canada , caribou , conservation , cull , culling , endangered , endangered species , extinct , extinction , killing , population management , populations , predators , shooting , Wildlife , wildlife management , wolf , wolves

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British Columbia to kill nearly 200 wolves in last-ditch effort to save caribou

Rudolph and his reindeer friends face population decline

December 24, 2014 by  
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Santa may need to look for an alternate form of transportation soon. Reindeer populations around the world have diminished greatly over the past few decades, and researchers in China are concerned about how long the species will survive if the decline continues at the current rate. Read the rest of Rudolph and his reindeer friends face population decline Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Animals , breeding , caribou , china , chinese , Christmas , Climate Change , conservation , ecosystems , endangered animals , hunting , poaching , population decline , reindeer , research

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Melodie Dearden Creates a Perfect Gingerbread Replica of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater!

December 24, 2014 by  
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We had to share this ambitious gingerbread masterpiece replicating in small scale Frank Lloyd Wright ‘s Fallingwater, created by culinary artist Melodie Dearden. On Dearden’s  Garden Melodies  blog, she shares the painstaking process of building such an intricate model from baked gingerbread sheets and quite a lot of frosting. For those not familiar with Fallingwater , it was built in the late 1930s in Western Pennsylvania, and it is famous for its cantilevered structures that peer, somewhat treacherously, over a waterfall. This home is a complicated plan that appears to float above the water, making it that much more challenging to recreate with only sugar to hold your building together! Read on to see how Melodie pulled it off. Read the rest of Melodie Dearden Creates a Perfect Gingerbread Replica of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , baking , Christmas , DIY , Falling Water , frank lloyd wright , gingerbread house , Holiday

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Melodie Dearden Creates a Perfect Gingerbread Replica of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater!

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