This shipping container hotel is so cool you’ll forget its a shipping container

July 14, 2017 by  
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Although building with shipping containers isn’t as avant-garde as it used to be, there are still some stunning designs that make us weep with joy. Built by Australian firm, Contained , this 20-foot shipping container has been converted into an ultra-sophisticated hotel room that can be easily folded up and shipped virtually anywhere in the world. Contained specializes in repurposing old shipping containers into sophisticated lodgings that, on top of being breathtakingly gorgeous, are also portable. Designed with transportation in mind, the structures are strategically outfitted to easily set up and unfold. The individual structures can be shipped virtually anywhere in the world. Related: This amazing shipping container hotel can pop up anywhere in the world Each unit is equipped with a queen-sized bed, a living room with a sink and bar area, and a bathroom. For outdoor space, guests can enjoy a spacious deck shaded by a fold-out awning. Large glass doors and an abundance of windows soak up daylight and the surrounding scenery. Although portability is a key concept in the renovation of the containers, the design of each individual unit is simply astonishing. The sophisticated and modern interiors give no clue to each building’s former utilitarian background. According to Contained directors Anatoly Mezhov and Irene Polo, their business goal is to create an option for people who’d like to travel in a more sustainable way , but without sacrificing comfort. “There are so many beautiful places to go visit. That’s how this idea was born. Let’s create a portable hotel room that’s beautiful, sustainable, and comfortable for short-term accommodation and activate some of these spaces.” Mezhov says. The company has installed their structures in numerous locations including a Victoria winery, Sydney Harbor, and a wilderness retreat in Queensland. + Contained Via Dwell Photography by Daniel John Bilsborough

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This shipping container hotel is so cool you’ll forget its a shipping container

Shipping container delivers heightened drama to a modern island home

July 12, 2017 by  
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A shipping container brings a sense of drama to this beautiful modern home on the tropical island of Lombok east of Bali. Indonesian architect Budi Pradono designed the Clay House, a luxury residence elevated on concrete stilts with views overlooking the Indian Ocean, paddy fields, and tropical forest. The building, which was conceived as a landmark for the island, is topped with a large shipping container placed at a sharp angle to appear as if it were slipping off. Located on a hill in Selong Belanak, the Clay House (nicknamed Seven Havens) comprises two elevated structures built with locally sourced materials . The 2.2-meter-tall shipping container, for instance, was sourced from the port of a nearby island and was placed at an angle of 60 degrees, creating a tall ceiling for the master bedroom to bring extra natural light indoors. The architect also built the 30-centimeter-thick walls from clay collected 20 kilometers from the site that was mixed by local craftsmen with sand, cement, straw, and cow dung. The board-marked clay walls help keep the interior naturally cool. Related: Modern recycled container house in South Africa operates 100% off grid The contemporary interior is grounded by the use of a natural materials palette that also helps complement the heavy building materials. Flattened bamboo lines the interior, while stone tiling is used throughout. The home is organized with open layouts and positioned to optimize views of the outdoors. + Budi Pradono Via Dezeen Images via Budi Pradono

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Shipping container delivers heightened drama to a modern island home

Elon Musk-inspired Hyperloop Hotel could be the future of travel

June 22, 2017 by  
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Imagine zipping between cities in mere minutes—all from the comfort of your hotel suite. That’s the futuristic vision of the $130 million Hyperloop Hotel, a proposal built upon Elon Musk’s Hyperloop One high-speed train system currently in development. Designed by University of Nevada, Las Vegas graduate architecture student Brandan Siebrecht, the Hyperloop Hotel envisions seamless transport between 13 cities with a proposed flat fee of $1,200. The visionary Hyperloop Hotel won the student section of this year’s Radical Innovation Award , an annual competition for futuristic hotel designs. Siebrecht’s winning design uses reclaimed shipping containers as mobile, customizable hotel rooms that zip between cities at near-supersonic speeds through tubes and dock at designated hotels. Guests could travel across the U.S. without leaving the comfort of their pods and handle the entire process, from reservation to travel arrangements, with their smartphone. Siebrecht created the design for America’s 13 largest cities including Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Denver, Sante Fe, Austin, Chicago, Nashville, Washington, D.C., New York City, and Boston. He drew inspiration from Musk’s Hyperloop test track, the DevLoop, located just outside Las Vegas. If successful, the high-speed train could zip travelers from Philadelphia to New York in 10 minutes. Related: Elon Musk reveals boring tunnels are for the Hyperloop Guests can customize the layout of the repurposed modular shipping container hotel rooms. Each hotel room includes areas for sleeping, bathing, living, and flex. Siebrecht estimates that the construction cost of each docking hotel between $8 and $10 million, and believes construction of his hotel concept feasible within the next five to 10 years. + Radical Innovation Award Via Business Insider

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Elon Musk-inspired Hyperloop Hotel could be the future of travel

ScottWhitbyStudio transforms a shipping container into a pop-up cinema

March 21, 2017 by  
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We’ve seen shipping containers repurposed into everything from homes to museums , but ScottWhitbyStudio’s recent cargotecture creation marks the first pop-up cinema that we’ve heard of. The London-based architecture and creative consultancy converted a single container into Caution Cinema, an immersive and funky movie theater as part of the ‘Beyond Zero’ health and safety campaign. The mobile cinema plays instructional videos to promote vital dockside safety information to port employees up and down the country. Working together with a major UK port operator, ScottWhitbyStudio was asked to create an engaging pop-up cinema that provided an immersive viewing experience that would block out the hectic and noisy port surroundings. In choosing the commonly found shipping container as the cinema structure, the designers introduced an element of surprise by dramatically transforming the windowless container interior into a “dark and mysterious realm, which challenged expectations.” Attendees to the Caution Cinema enter via a disorienting zigzagging path to the cinema, where all external light and sound are blocked out. Related: The epic Creative Co-Op Is a Multi-faceted Film Studio Made from Shipping Containers “Using this multi-sensory experience, visitors are forced to take extra care and to proceed with caution—as promoted by the safety campaign,” write the architects. “It is hoped that the memory of this multi-sensory experience and intervention will be embed[ded] in the user’s memory for a long time to come.” All internal surfaces, from the entrance path to the cinema and seating, are clad in over a thousand pyramidal acoustic foam pieces laid out in a checkered pattern of black, blue, and red. The resilient foam pyramids create a soundless chamber so that attendees can focus on the video presentation without external distraction. + ScottWhitbyStudio Images via ScottWhitbyStudio © Osman Marfo-Gyasi

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ScottWhitbyStudio transforms a shipping container into a pop-up cinema

Norwegian cabin weathers a harsh climate for breathtaking views

March 15, 2017 by  
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Norway’s Lofoten archipelago is famous for its spectacular scenery with dramatic mountains and views of the northern lights—but its remote location up north also means a bitterly harsh climate in winter. Architect Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk was asked to create a summer retreat on a coastal Lofoten island that would be strong enough to withstand the harsh climate, particularly high-speed winds and rain. He and his team of architects completed the Summer House Gravråk, a renovated timber structure with a new addition and beautiful modern interior. The 25-square-meter Summer House Gravråk began with the rehabilitation of an old “Nordlandshus,” a kind of a traditional northern Norwegian home with a gabled roof and timber structure. The architects extended the building’s existing footprint with an addition towards the west that matched the original structure’s design. The exterior is clad in untreated spruce, which developed a gray patina after exposure to the elements. Standing seam zinc roofing tops the building. Related: Norwegian Mountain Cottage Stands on Stilts to Preserve Native Reindeer Moss The extension is constructed with prefabricated pine glulam and is wind-anchored to an encapsulating concrete slab that serves as a stabilizing counterweight, while the existing building is guy-wired to the ground. “The addition is a pure extension of the existing building, and re-uses the geometrical principle with asymmetrical dormer windows to let in light and give a view from the loft,” write the architects. The windows are constructed with aluminum frames on the exterior and wood on the interior to match the interior birch plywood cladding. The interior is minimally furnished and the abundance of windows keeps the focus on the landscape. The architects also constructed a small green-roofed annex separate from the main building. + Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk Images via Carl-Viggo Hølmebakk

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Norwegian cabin weathers a harsh climate for breathtaking views

6 amphibious houses that float to escape flooding

January 12, 2017 by  
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Building in a flood zone sounds like asking for trouble, but that doesn’t have to be the case if you use the right construction techniques. The most basic strategy to avoid rising waters is to raise the buildings above the flood level, but we’re more impressed by the houses that actually float off the ground when waters rush in. While this type of automated flood defense isn’t as common as elevated homes , we may see it pop up in more houses as flooding threatens to become a regular occurrence around the world. To take a closer look at these adaptive structures, we’ve rounded up six amphibious houses that float above the floodwaters—keep reading to see them all. Amphibious House by Baca Architects Baca Architects designed the Amphibious House, a flood-resistant home that enjoys gorgeous waterfront views without risk of water damage. Sited on the coveted banks of the River Thames in Buckinghamshire’s town of Marlow, the luxury home, which is described as the UK’s first amphibious house, rests on separated foundations that let the structure float upwards on extended guideposts when the River Thames overflows. The buoyant home has a 2.5-meter-high floodwater clearance. FLOAT House by Morphosis The LEED Platinum -certified FLOAT House is one of our favorite amphibious homes due to its small environmental footprint. Designed by Morphosis for Brad Pitt’s Make it Right Foundation in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward, the net-zero 945-square-foot home offers a solution for floodwater-prone regions around the globe. The house is built on a prefabricated chassis made of polystyrene foam coated in glass fiber-reinforced concrete that’s lightweight enough to serve as a raft when floodwaters buoy the home up. Bamboo homes by H&P Architects Amphibious homes can also be affordable, as evidenced in H&P Architects’ designs for these bamboo homes in Southeast Asia. Made from locally-sourced bamboo , the thatched homes are built on platforms constructed from reused oil drums anchored in place. The recycled oil drums serve as a float and allow floodwater to buoy the home upwards. Maasbommel’s Amphibious Homes by Waterstudio and Dura Vermeer It should come as no surprise that the Netherlands is home to amphibious architecture given their low-lying landscapes. Dutch firms Waterstudio and Dura Vermeer completed a famous example of amphibious housing in Maasbommel, an area near the Maas River. Though the homes there sit on the river bottom, the architecture is engineered so that the house and foundation will float upwards in the event of a flood. Electrical and sewer lines are kept intact thanks to flexible pipes. Amphibious Container by Green Container International Aid When heavy monsoon rains caused major flooding in Pakistan in 2010, approximately one-fifth of the country’s total land area was affected and 20 million people were directly affected. In a bid to provide relief, Green Container International Aid designed the Amphibious Container, an emergency shelter made from reclaimed shipping containers , shipping pallets, and inner tire tubes that can break away from the ground and float in case of flooding. The Greenhouse That Grows Legs by Between Art and Technology Studio While the above amphibious house examples explore buoyancy, Between Art and Technology (BAT) Studio decided to take a different approach in their design of a flood-resistant structure. Instead of letting the waters push the structure up, the Greenhouse That Grows Legs uses a hydraulic lifting system that can raise the building 800 millimeters off the ground. The homeowners can move the building via remote control .

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6 amphibious houses that float to escape flooding

Prefab ‘Bank in a Can’ delivers banking services to remote areas of Africa

January 12, 2017 by  
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People who live in rural areas of Africa in particular don’t always have access to reliable ATMs or other banking services. To help alleviate this issue, Johannesburg’s A4AC designed new prefabricated banking units called BANK IN A CAN that can be delivered to remote, rural areas. The Bank in a Can project was realized in collaboration between A4AC and FNB (First National Bank) as a banking solution for rural areas where people don’t have access to quality banking and financial services. Each prefabricated container is branded with graphics inspired by different local contexts. Related: World’s tiniest phone repair shops open in London’s iconic red telephone boxes The units are designed to be deployed in any rural or urban community and can be made operational within a few weeks. The foundations and structural infrastructure are prepared on site prior to the arrival of mobile units. The roof structure is then installed over the units. + A4AC

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Prefab ‘Bank in a Can’ delivers banking services to remote areas of Africa

Old shipping container recycled into solar-powered learning lab in Colombia

November 14, 2016 by  
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Computer Aid International first approached Squire and Partners in 2014 for a more cost-effective and enjoyable version of the nonprofit’s original Zubabox, ten of which had already been deployed in eleven locations across Africa. The architects began with the same recycled shipping container framework that defined the original Zubabox, but then maximized the number of openings in the new Zubabox to increase cross ventilation and natural light. A shaded external deck was added to expand the building footprint, while a larger roof size allowed for a greater number of solar panels . Related: World’s largest shipping container shopping mall pops up in Seoul Squire and Partners worked with Bogota-based manufacturers, furniture makers, and artists to deliver the redesigned Zubabox to Cazuca in 2016. The shipping container was locally converted and outfitted with bespoke timber seating and desks, as well as a graffiti mural by two local artists. The lab is equipped with ten donated refurbished computers. The simple modular design can operate alone or be grouped together with other units. Donated oil drums were recycled as planters for native trees and flowers to create a garden in front of the Zubabox. + Squire and Partners Images via Squire and Partners

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Old shipping container recycled into solar-powered learning lab in Colombia

Worlds largest shipping container shopping mall pops up in Seoul

November 8, 2016 by  
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Located in Seoul’s Gwangjin District, Common Ground was an experimental project that sought to revitalize an unused lot in the middle of the capital. The use of prefabricated shipping containers lowered construction cost and reduced construction time to just five months. Each container is painted an eye-catching bright blue and is stacked together into three-story structures that divide the lot into two main spaces: the Market Hall and the Street Market. The stacked containers frame a central square that hosts weekend markets, exhibitions, and performances. Related: Bright and bold QUO shipping container mall springs up in Buenos Aires “Street Market draws inspiration from an alley market and keeps the texture of the container intact as much as possible,” writes Urbantainer. “Market Hall capitalises on trusses with strong architectural functions and serve as a reminder of the feeling of a market . In this part, the verticality of stacked container modules and the frames between containers are emphasised.” In keeping with its unconventional form, Common Ground hosts up-and-coming new designers, mid-sized shops, and editorial stores, rather than large mainstream brands. The 200 shipping containers house seventy stores, twenty restaurants, and a third-floor roof terrace. + Urbantainer Images via Urbantainer

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Worlds largest shipping container shopping mall pops up in Seoul

Shipping container is converted into a chic portable boutique shop in Toronto

August 16, 2016 by  
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Needs & Wants Studio sourced the container from the Canadian supplier Storstac and, following designs they created last fall, painted the facade white and lined the interior with light-colored wood. To give the small 160-square-foot shipping container a sense of spaciousness, the mobile boutique created entrances on both ends that are kept open to expand the showroom’s footprint to the outdoors. Mirrored, one-way glazing was also inserted into two large square cutouts on the long walls. Related: Australia’s Largest Cargotecture House is a Modern Masterpiece Built from 31 Shipping Containers The interior is minimally decorated and a large mirror propped against one wall helps with the illusion of spaciousness. Needs & Wants Studio’s clothing line, which focuses on upscale mens outerwear, is elegantly displayed on metal racks. The herringbone -patterned floor and uneven timber paneling on the walls and ceiling give the space texture to keep it from looking dull. In addition to the mobile boutique’s scheduled tour, the Toronto brand has plans to create a second portable showroom that will be “designed for water.” + Needs & Wants Studio Via Dezeen Images via Needs & Wants Studio

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