Young filmmaker transforms boring Chevy van into a slick solar-powered mobile home

June 10, 2016 by  
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Zach bought his used 2003 Chevy Express van for $4,000 in August 2014 and spent a total of $15,000 to convert the van into his mobile dream home . While he concedes that the cost was high (and more than he initially anticipated), it allowed him to achieve a stunning custom build that maximizes every square inch of space and is tailored to his exact specifications. The exterior was kept white to stay as inconspicuous as possible, however, the interior sports a stylish timber-lined living space inspired by minimalist Scandinavian design principles. The converted van comprises a futon bed on one end and a L-shaped desk space with an integrated kitchen on the other. His kitchen features an ARB 50-quart Fridge/Freezer combo as well as an Origo two-burner alcohol stove stored beneath a desktop. The van roof is topped by two Boulder 90 solar panels paired with a Goal Zero Yeti Solar Generator that powers all his electronics. Rather than install a full sink and water pump , Zach opted for the low-tech solution of a five-gallon water jug. With no water hookup and limited space, there’s also no shower or toilet. The young filmmaker makes use of gym showers and public restrooms. Related: 6 fab mobile offices let you ditch the cubicle for the open road “Filmmaking by nature is a nomadic pursuit. It’s a constant migration to and from different locations based on what the storytelling requires,” said Zach Both. “With this van, I now have complete freedom to write a script surrounded by mountains, direct a shoot in a remote desert town and then collaborate with an editor or composer in Los Angeles—all within the same month. That would be impossible any other way.” For more information on how Zach was able to realize his mobile lifestyle, head over to The Vanual for his step-by-step conversion guide and digital nomad tips and tricks. + The Vanual Images via The Vanual

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Young filmmaker transforms boring Chevy van into a slick solar-powered mobile home

Apple is launching a new company to sell surplus solar energy

June 10, 2016 by  
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For years, Apple has been generating solar power at a number of enormous solar farms around the world, helping offset the energy used by its many manufacturing and distribution facilities. Although the company isn’t completely powering its global operations by solar energy , there is enough excess solar power being generated by Apple’s California headquarters and Nevada solar farm to warrant a new venture: Apple Energy LLC . The energy spin off company could begin selling surplus solar power as early as August. Apple has a long track record of green investments, with solar farms in multiple countries, including China . The company generates enough solar power to meet 93 percent of its global energy needs, according to Apple’s latest environmental responsibility report . Last year, Greenpeace even named the California-based company the ‘ world’s greenest tech company ’ for its efforts in sustainable business practices, so it’s not surprising that Apple is taking its commitment one step further. Related: Apple unveils nature-filled, solar-powered future for its retail stores worldwide News of Apple’s foray into the field of energy sales was scooped by 9to5Mac , which reported that the company’s June 6 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) filing claims it can legally sell energy at market rates, since the new venture isn’t big enough to influence prices. The target audience for Apple Energy is a little unclear at this stage in the game, though. Most companies sell excess solar energy to corporate clients, but some suspect Apple could sell the surplus energy generated by the rooftop solar array at its Cupertino, California headquarters to local residents. Apple asked the FERC to grant permission to begin operations 60 days after its application, so we expect to report back with answers in early August. Via Engadget Images via Foster + Partners and Apple

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Apple is launching a new company to sell surplus solar energy

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