Lyft is making all their rides carbon neutral

April 19, 2018 by  
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If you use ride-sharing services but still worry about their impact on the environment, Lyft has got you covered. The company has just announced that it will invest millions of dollars to offset its carbon emissions. Co-founders John Zimmer and Logan Green said in a blog post that the ridesharing company will become “one of the world’s largest voluntary purchasers of carbon offsets” as they make all their trips carbon neutral from now on. According to Zimmer and Green, while all cars will be cleanly powered at some point in the future, climate change isn’t waiting, so they’re taking action. Lyft is partnering with 3Degrees to offset carbon emissions from their rides around the world. Zimmer and Green said, “The stark reality is that transportation is one of the largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions. As a growing part of the transportation ecosystem, we are holding ourselves accountable to being part of the solution.” Related: VW unveils fully electric six-seater specifically for ridesharing Lyft rides will be carbon neutral due to “the direct funding of emission mitigation efforts, including the reduction of emissions in the automotive manufacturing process, renewable energy programs, forestry projects, and the capture of emissions from landfills.” These projects will be based in the United States. 3Degrees will oversee “the independent verification of all projects according to rigorous third-party standards” and ensure the company is “only supporting emission reductions that are new and would not have happened but for Lyft’s investment.” The company offered nearly 50 million rides last month. Green and Zimmer said they feel responsible for Lyft’s impact on the Earth, and they joined the We Are Still In movement spearheaded by former New York City mayor and philanthropist Michael Bloomberg to show support for the Paris Agreement . Lyft expects to offset more than one million metric tons of carbon in the first year — the equivalent of taking hundreds of thousands of vehicles off the streets or planting tens of millions of trees . The co-founders said this isn’t their full solution to the issue of climate change, but it is one step forward. + All Lyft Rides Are Now Carbon Neutral Images via Lyft

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Lyft is making all their rides carbon neutral

There’s a California fault far more dangerous than San Andreas – and it’s ready to go off

April 19, 2018 by  
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Everyone knows that California’s San Andreas fault is a ticking time bomb ready to erupt – but a new study shows that another fault right under the East Bay is far more dangerous. The Hayward fault could decimate major cities like Oakland and Berkeley, killing hundreds and destroying tens of thousands of homes. And according to scientists, “it’s just waiting to go off.” ? This week, scientists published a landmark study that detailed a 52-mile fault centered under Oakland, California. If the fault were to erupt – and it is only a matter of time until it does – the US Geological Survey estimates the toll would include at least 800 killed, 18,000 injured, 400,000 displaced and 52,000 homes destroyed. Most homes would be destroyed by the 400 fires scientists estimate would ignite, and the shattered water infrastructure would complicate firefighter’s efforts to put them out. Related: The mega-earthquake that will probably someday wipe Seattle off the map “This fault is what we sort of call a tectonic time bomb,” USGS earthquake geologist emeritus David Schwartz said. “It’s just waiting to go off.” There are certainly larger faults out there (like the San Andreas), but what makes the Hayward fault so deadly is that 2 million people live right on top of it. For reference, the 1906 quake that devastated San Francisco was centered off the coast and impacted a city of 400,000 residents. The Hayward fault is relatively active, with a major earthquake every 150 years or so (give or take 75 years). Its last major earthquake – a 6.8 – was 150 years ago this October. In 1989, the 6.9 Loma Prieta shook the Bay Area and caused about 60 deaths and $82 billion in damage. A similar quake on the Hayward fault today would be 10 times as bad, and even homes that stood during the Loma Prieta quake could be shattered. The bottom line is that the cities and citizens along the fault need to work to improve infrastructure, secure homes and make sure that they are prepared for the next big one. It’s easy to get complacent when it has been a while since the last earthquake , scientists say, but that’s when you have to be most prepared. Via LA Times Images via Jeff Pierre

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There’s a California fault far more dangerous than San Andreas – and it’s ready to go off

Why more businesses should reassess the voluntary carbon market

April 13, 2018 by  
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Science-based carbon targets and climate risk disclosures are practical motivators.

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Why more businesses should reassess the voluntary carbon market

Episode 89: Corporates grow onsite solar; what is ‘climate gentrification’?

August 18, 2017 by  
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In this week’s episode, Expedia takes a community approach to carbon offsets; an interview with Denver’s CSO; is alternative energy dead?

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Episode 89: Corporates grow onsite solar; what is ‘climate gentrification’?

Episode 89: Corporates grow onsite solar; what is ‘climate gentrification’?

August 18, 2017 by  
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In this week’s episode, Expedia takes a community approach to carbon offsets; an interview with Denver’s CSO; is alternative energy dead?

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Episode 89: Corporates grow onsite solar; what is ‘climate gentrification’?

Episode 89: Corporates grow onsite solar; what is ‘climate gentrification’?

August 18, 2017 by  
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In this week’s episode, Expedia takes a community approach to carbon offsets; an interview with Denver’s CSO; is alternative energy dead?

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Episode 89: Corporates grow onsite solar; what is ‘climate gentrification’?

Why travel giant Expedia paid a premium for these carbon offsets

August 14, 2017 by  
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At least 60 percent of the revenue related to COTAP offsets goes directly to addressing economic inequity.

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Why travel giant Expedia paid a premium for these carbon offsets

Why travel giant Expedia paid a premium for these carbon offsets

August 14, 2017 by  
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At least 60 percent of the revenue related to COTAP offsets goes directly to addressing economic inequity.

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Why travel giant Expedia paid a premium for these carbon offsets

Episode 87: Apple branches out; it’s time to reimagine carbon

August 4, 2017 by  
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In this week’s episode, JP Morgan commits billions to “clean” financing, how to heal our overdrawn ecological budget — and corals get health insurance.

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Episode 87: Apple branches out; it’s time to reimagine carbon

Atlanta’s model for the future of urban green spaces

August 4, 2017 by  
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The multi-use BeltLine trail system is driving economic, environmental and cultural renewal — while saving the city millions of dollars.

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Atlanta’s model for the future of urban green spaces

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