Floating, solar-powered ‘dragonfly’ bridge can sail to new locations

August 10, 2017 by  
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This floating pedestrian bridge  can sail along rivers and oceans like a boat. Designer Margot Krasojevic conceived the bridge as a flexible structure that can be folded, stacked and expanded so that it can be moored along quaysides, sailed to different locations, or permanently positioned. The Ordos government commissioned Krasojevic to design a pedestrian bridge which would cross the Wulanmulun River, located in Ordos city, Kangbashi district Mongolia. The SailBoat bridge consists of a main floating section, three expanding walkways, and a carbon fiber triple sail. The sail can be lowered and raised by a buoyancy rotator and allows the bridge to function as a sailboat in order to reach new locations. Cylindrical cross-flow turbines function as rafts and help stabilize the primary structure. Related: Margot Krasojevic designs Belgrade trolly system powered by piezoelectricity A hydraulic telescopic secondary structure supports the pedestrian walkway which expands and contracts into the main body of the structure. The walkways are flexible and can adapt to different spans. Caisson foundations and screw-in moorings can be used to permanently stabilize the bridge. A rotating Mobius ballast chamber hydraulically operated by a thruster and powered by photovoltaic cells rotates the sails which are made from lightweight aluminium and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer. + Margot Krasojevic Architecture

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Floating, solar-powered ‘dragonfly’ bridge can sail to new locations

The world’s most compact electric bike folds to fit into your backpack

May 25, 2017 by  
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Forget traditional bikes or skateboards – the future of green transportation is the Smacircle S1 , an incredibly compact and lightweight electric bike that can be folded up and carried in your backpack. Introduced to the world via an IndieGoGo campaign , the invention has surpassed its startup goal by 281% – and it’s not difficult to comprehend why. The carbon fiber S1 eBike can be folded in five simple steps and can travel up to 12.4 mph. Additionally, though it only weighs 15.4 lbs, the eBike can hold 220 lbs. According to the founders of the Smacircle S1, the road-legal ergonomic design folds to 19-inches and, with a 240W motor, can propel commuters in quick fashion without the need to pedal. On a single charge, the eBike can deliver a distance of 12 miles. After being plugged into any domestic power socket for 2.5 hours, it is ready to go again. The invention is road-legal and provides both front and side lights to make it highly visible to vehicles, pedestrians and other cyclists on the road. Electric brakes allow the bike to quickly stop to prevent accidents. The S1 automatically syncs to your smartphone when you approach, and an app unlocks the eBike. This feature prevents the invention from being stolen, as the accelerator deactivates until the original owner unlocks the S1. Other features of the app include the ability to adjust the lights’ intensity, track routes traveled and monitor speed and battery life. Once they’re rolling, commuters can attach their phones to the handlebars to keep the device fully charged, thanks to a built-in USB charger. Related: Make Your Own Electric Bicycle With the Ultimate DIY Ebike Guide The initial crowdfunding goal was set at $30,000 – but the project surpassed its goal by 281% in just five days. According to the founders, the next crowdfunding campaign will attempt to reach $300,000 to “put the next generation eBike into mass production.” The starting price for an S1 eBike is $1,499. + Smacircle S1 Images via Smacircle S1 IndieGoGo campaign

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Drones weave moth-inspired pavilion from carbon fiber threads

April 12, 2017 by  
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The buildings of the future could be built with the help of drones . The unmanned aerial vehicles were put to the test in the University of Stuttgart’s latest robotically constructed pavilion, the cantilevering ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion 2016-17. Inspired by leaf miner moths, the biomimetic pavilion is lightweight yet incredibly strong and is made from 184 kilometers of resin-impregnated glass and carbon fiber. Created as part of a series of digitally fabricated pavilions, the ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion 2016-17 explores the potential of fiber composite materials in architecture and scalable fabrication processes. Spanning twelve meters in length, the cantilevering research pavilion has a surface area of approximately 40 square meters that weighs 1,000 kilograms. Its woven design draws inspiration from the silk “hammocks” spun by the larvae of leaf miner moths. The pavilion was constructed with two different types of robots : flying drones and stationary machines. Two stationary machines were set up on the far points of the pavilion and were equipped with industrial robotic arms strong enough to wind the carbon fiber threads. The drones were used to pass the fiber between the two stationary machines. The two types of robots communicated without the need for human intervention using an integrated sensor interface that collected real-time data. Related: Robots weave an insect-inspired carbon-fiber forest in London “The pavilion’s overall geometry demonstrates the possibilities for fabricating structural morphologies through multi-stage volumetric fibre winding, reducing unnecessary formwork through an integrated bending-active composite frame, and increasing the possible scale and span of construction through integrating robotic and autonomous lightweight UAV fabrication processes,” wrote the interdisciplinary team. “The prototypical pavilion is a proof-of-concept for a scalable fabrication processes of long-span, fibre composite structural elements, suitable for architectural applications.” + University of Stuttgart ICD Photographs by Burggraf / Reichert

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Drones weave moth-inspired pavilion from carbon fiber threads

BMW’s futuristic self-balancing motorcycle is like a real-life Batman’s Batpod

October 18, 2016 by  
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BMW is celebrating their 100-year anniversary in style, with futuristic vehicle concepts designed to wow and inspire. They just unveiled their BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100 , a zero emissions motorcycle offering a host of fancy connectivity features. As BMW unveiled the design in movie mecca Los Angeles, their Motorrad VISION NEXT 100 reminds many of the sleek superhero motorcycles that have zoomed across the big screen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oW0ShDRggts The Motorrad is made of carbon fiber and polished aluminium. A triangular frame hearkens back to BMW motorcycles of the past, such as the company’s first motorcycle, the R32, made in 1923. The futuristic motorcycle is equipped with a self-balancing function, to boost safety and stability. Related: BMW’s crazy shape-shifting future car is straight out of a science fiction movie The motorcycle was designed with an emphasis on balancing safety and freedom. The designers wanted riders to feel the wind without helmets or bulky protective clothing so they put a ” digital companion ” into the motorcycle to minimize crashes and enhance safety. The digital companion can intervene if necessary. Sensor technology built into the motorcycle provides information to ensure safety. Instead of a helmet, Motorrad motorcyclists wear a visor that provides information from the motorcycle triggered by eye movements. If a rider looks up, they’ll see what they would see in a rearview mirror. If they look slightly down, they’ll be able to access a menu. Looking down further opens a map. If they look straight ahead, the visor clears so it doesn’t inhibit a rider’s view. Wearables also augment the freeing experience. BMW designed light clothing that includes A/C and neck support provided via air. Vibrating elements on the arms of the superhero-like outfit offer navigational signals. According to BMW, the Motorrad VISION NEXT 100 ” catapults you into the 40s of the 21st century .” It is only display along with the other three futuristic vehicles in Los Angeles from October 13 through October 19. Via The Verge Images via BMW ( 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 )

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BMW’s futuristic self-balancing motorcycle is like a real-life Batman’s Batpod

Students create a battery-powered personal helicopter

December 28, 2015 by  
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It may not look like the jetpack science fiction has taught you to imagine, but you might soon have the power to glide gracefully over the landscape in your own personal flying machine . A team of students from the National University of Singapore have created a one-person helicopter capable of carrying one pilot weighing up to 70 kg (154 lbs) for five minutes. Read the rest of Students create a battery-powered personal helicopter

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Students use rippling carbon fiber to create an innovative architectural facade

August 10, 2015 by  
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In the past year, we’ve witnessed a large growth of composite applications in architecture. Last year we covered the IIT College of Architecture ‘s FIBERwave Pavilion . This year, professor Alphonso Peluso, who led the project, wanted to start a new project to replace an existing relic at the school: a 1990’s full scale two-story glass and steel curtain wall mock-up that was used for teaching architecture students about curtain wall design and construction. The mock-up has fallen out of fashion and has been left untouched for a number of years. This semester’s plan was to retro-fit a portion of the facade mock-up with carbon fiber. While last year’s project was funding via crowdsourcing, this year the school is relying on donated or discounted materials. After some trial and error over the semester, and a contest to determine the winning final design, the students created the idea of creating panels using wood molds and carbon fiber covered in primer, called CARBONskin. “I’ve… been given renewed enthusiasm about what my students and I will accomplish in the future with the support of so many in the composites industry who are interested in our work and are supporting us on this project,” said Peluso. + IIT College of Architecture

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Students use rippling carbon fiber to create an innovative architectural facade

Would you buy this wooden bicycle for $11,000?

July 31, 2015 by  
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Extreme hanging pods create a meditative, light-controlled space for rock climbers

July 27, 2015 by  
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Cracked cellphone screens will soon be able to repair themselves

June 23, 2015 by  
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Have you ever been misfortunate or clumsy enough to drop your phone, leaving a spiderweb of cracks that, at best, serves as an embarrassing conversation starter or, at worst, turns your phone into an expensive paperweight? Within five years, our smartphones could all hold the technology to self-repair cracks completely on their own. Read the rest of Cracked cellphone screens will soon be able to repair themselves Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon based healing agents , carbon fiber composites , cellphone screen crack , duncan wass , self repairing cellphone screen , self repairing screen , smartphone screen crack , university of bristol

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Cracked cellphone screens will soon be able to repair themselves

Michael Sodeau and Hypetex Design World’s First Colored Carbon Fiber Chair

August 6, 2014 by  
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Hypetex , the world’s first colored carbon fiber brand, teamed up with London furniture designer Michael Sodeau to create Halo, a minimalist lounge chair made from Hypetex’s high-tech composite carbon fiber . Created by leading engineers from Formula One racing, the strong but lightweight Hypetex material is available in a wide range of vibrant colors, making it ideal for use in design applications. Set to be introduced at September’s designjunction London design show, the launch of the Halo chair will also mark the introduction of Hypetex to the design world. + Hypetex + Michael Sodeau The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon fiber , carbon fiber furniture , composite material , designjunction , formula one racing , furniture design , halo chair , hypetex , hypetex halo chair , London , michael Sodeau , reader submitted content

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