Earth911.com Quiz #14: U.S. Recycling Capacity After China’s Waste Import Ban

June 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Earth911.com Quiz #14: U.S. Recycling Capacity After China’s Waste Import Ban

Making smart sustainable choices requires practice. Earth911’s weekly sustainability quiz … The post Earth911.com Quiz #14: U.S. Recycling Capacity After China’s Waste Import Ban appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read more from the original source:
Earth911.com Quiz #14: U.S. Recycling Capacity After China’s Waste Import Ban

PittMoss: Recycled Soil Substitute Delivers Better Growth With One-Third the Water

June 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on PittMoss: Recycled Soil Substitute Delivers Better Growth With One-Third the Water

PittMoss was a surprising discovery for me several weeks ago. … The post PittMoss: Recycled Soil Substitute Delivers Better Growth With One-Third the Water appeared first on Earth911.com.

More here:
PittMoss: Recycled Soil Substitute Delivers Better Growth With One-Third the Water

American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution

April 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution

Energy storage has been a leading obstacle to widespread adoption of solar energy , but that may be about to change. A new nature-inspired electrode developed by two scientists at RMIT University in Australia could hold the key to drastically improved storage. Their electrode, which is based on patterns in the western swordfern, could boost the capacity of storage technologies by a staggering 3,000 percent. The groundbreaking electrode is made with graphene , and according to the university, could open the door to flexible, thin solar capture and storage technology. This would allow us to place a thin film on smartphones, cars, or buildings – enabling them to power themselves with solar energy. Related: Pocket-sized HeLi-on charger uses flexible, printed solar cells to power your phone The two researchers found inspiration for their prototype in the veins of the Polystichum munitum , a native western North American fern. Researcher Min Gu said in a statement, “The leaves of the western swordfern are densely crammed with veins, making them extremely efficient for storing energy and transporting water around the plant. Our electrode is based on these fractal shapes – which are self-replicating, like the mini structures within snowflakes – and we’ve used this naturally efficient design to improve solar energy storage at a nano level.” The electrode could be combined with supercapacitors , which have been combined with solar already but haven’t been widely utilized for storage due to limited capacity. But the scientists’ prototype can increase their capacity 30 times greater than current limits, according to Gu. The journal Scientific Reports published the research online the end of March. Paper lead author Litty Thekkekara said by using their electrode with a solar cell, we could develop flexible thin film solar, replacing the rigid, bulky solar cells that are limited in use. Smartphone batteries would become a thing of the past, and hybrid cars wouldn’t need charging stations, if scientists could build on this research to develop thin film solar. Via RMIT University Images via RMIT University

See the original post here: 
American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution

NYC community gardens may wither under Trump’s proposed budget cuts

April 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on NYC community gardens may wither under Trump’s proposed budget cuts

President Donald Trump’s proposed budget cuts could mean the kiss of death for New York City’s community gardens . More than 500 of the communal spaces across all five boroughs depend on a program called GreenThumb , which is administered by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation . Initiated in the wake of the 1970s fiscal crisis, which resulted in the widespread abandonment of both private and public land, GreenThumb has turned hundreds of derelict lots into tillage. Most of its funding comes from federal Community Development Block Grants—the same ones the budget blueprint seeks to eliminate. Should the budget pass, GreenThumb risks losing $1 million a year out of a $2.4 million budget, according to WNYC . Related: Detroit nonprofit seeks crowdfunding for new East Side community garden “It would be devastating to GreenThumb, it would mean laying off a dozen workers or more, and it would be less money for supplies, for bulbs, for tools,” said New York City Councilman Mark Levine, who chairs the city’s Parks and Recreation Committee. Levine, WNYC adds, is working on securing more money for community gardens, as well as the restoration of jobs for 150 Parks department gardeners and maintenance workers. Via WNYC Photos by Unsplash

Go here to see the original: 
NYC community gardens may wither under Trump’s proposed budget cuts

Want a resilient world? Start with resilient data

February 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Want a resilient world? Start with resilient data

As we work to build our capacity to cope with global climate change, let’s make sure the tools we’re using can roll with the punches, too.

The rest is here:
Want a resilient world? Start with resilient data

Here’s how microgrids and utilities are getting along

October 30, 2015 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Here’s how microgrids and utilities are getting along

As the cost of solar goes down and the capacity of energy storage goes up, microgrids are challenging the traditional utility model, which some utilities see as an opportunity.

Read more from the original source:
Here’s how microgrids and utilities are getting along

To build long term sustainability, envision the future first

June 21, 2013 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on To build long term sustainability, envision the future first

This kind of creative thinking helps companies build the capacity to turn long-term challenges into opportunities.  

Read more:
To build long term sustainability, envision the future first

Germany Will Phase Out Nuclear Power by 2022

June 1, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech

Comments Off on Germany Will Phase Out Nuclear Power by 2022

The German government has decided to phase out all nuclear power in the country in the next 11 years.

Continued here: 
Germany Will Phase Out Nuclear Power by 2022

New York City Area Doubled Its Solar Power Capacity in 2010

March 3, 2011 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Eco Tech

Comments Off on New York City Area Doubled Its Solar Power Capacity in 2010

Private solar power installations at homes and businesses more than doubled last year in New York City and Westchester County.  In 2009, 134 PV systems were installed in that area and solar power capacity was 4 MW.  Last year, there were 203 PV installations, bringing the capacity up to 8.5 MW. Westchester County installations actually fell slightly from 2009, but the New York City boroughs ramped up their solar.  Queens actually quadrupled its installations from 16 in 2009 to 64 in 2010, adding over 1,538 kW of capacity. Utility company Con Edison is taking the credit for the solar boom saying they promoted the economic and environmental benefits of solar power systems and also streamlined the approval process for residential systems under 25 kW.

See more here: 
New York City Area Doubled Its Solar Power Capacity in 2010

SkySails’ Ship-Propelling Kites Get a Customer in Cargill

March 2, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech

Comments Off on SkySails’ Ship-Propelling Kites Get a Customer in Cargill

We’ve written a few times about the fuel-reducing power of the ship-propelling SkySail kites .  In trial runs, the large sails, which are mounted to the front of container ships, have been able to cut fuel use by 20 percent and the company says that the sails could cut fuel use by up to 35 percent in real-world applications. Now SkySails has a major customer in Cargill, a shipping company that transports more than 185 million tons of goods each year.  Cargill doesn’t own any ships themselves, but the companyhas signed a contract with SkySails to test a kite on one of the handysize vessels that it operates through an agreement with the ship’s owner.  The handysize vessel weighs in at 25,000 to 30,000 tons, which means it will be the largest ship so far to be propelled by a kite. The SkySail system should be outfitted on the ship by early 2012 and if all goes well, Cargill will make a larger order.  A study by the United Nations International Maritime Organization found that use of SkySails on ships worldwide could reduce shipping CO2 emissions by 100 million tons a year.  Let’s hope more large ships will be outfitted with this technology soon.

Read the original: 
SkySails’ Ship-Propelling Kites Get a Customer in Cargill

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 959 access attempts in the last 7 days.