LEED Gold-targeted Knight Campus advances scientific innovation

January 13, 2021 by  
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The University of Oregon recently welcomed the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact, a 160,000-square-foot campus built to accelerate groundbreaking scientific discovery and development in a collaborative multidisciplinary environment. Designed by New York-based  Ennead Architects  and Portland-based Bora Architecture & Interiors, the Knight Campus raises the bar for research facilities with its human-centered design that prioritizes wellness and socialization as well as energy efficiency. The eco-conscious campus features high-performance glazing as well as cross-laminated timber materials and is on track to achieve LEED Gold certification.  Named after benefactors Penny and Phil Knight who contributed a $500 million lead gift, the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact comprises a pair of L-shaped towers that frame an elevated terrace and courtyard at the heart of the campus. Transparency is emphasized throughout the design from the glass bridge that connects the two towers to the large expanses of glazing that make up the buildings’ unique  double-skin facade  and put the interior lab and office spaces on display. “So much of research is about improving the human condition,” said Todd Schliemann, Design Partner at Ennead Architects. “Our goal for the Knight Campus was the creation of a humanistic research machine – one that supports practical needs and aesthetic aspirations, but more importantly, one that inspires the people who work in it, those that move through it and those that simply pass by, and that contributes to the  university  community and the greater context.” Related: Oregon Ducks hit a home run with über-green Jane Sanders Stadium The campus was designed with input from University of Oregon faculty and staff, who helped inform the building’s open workspaces of varied sizes and highly adaptive spaces that give researchers the freedom to change their lab spaces to nimbly work across fields as needed. The new labs also boast cutting-edge technologies, such as  3D-printing  and rapid prototyping, to speed up the process of taking scientific discovery to market.  + Ennead Architects Images via Ennead Architects

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LEED Gold-targeted Knight Campus advances scientific innovation

Armenias first BREEAM-certified building is an earthquake-resistant international school

December 7, 2016 by  
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Deep in the forested mountains of the Armenian town Dilijan—colloquially called “Little Switzerland”—stands the country’s first BREEAM -certified structure: UWC Dilijan College . London-based Tim Flynn Architects designed the international school to work in harmony with the environment. Green roofs and living walls made from native vegetation cover large sections school’s main academic building to beautify the structure and tie the building back to its surroundings in the National Park of Dilijan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2fWhg2kzrc The environmentally friendly UWC Dilijan College earned an international BREEAM “Good” rating for its design, but also focuses on encouraging collaborative learning and promoting self-motivated learning with attractive and welcoming architecture. A natural materials palette integrates the modern academic structures into the natural environment. Armenia’s famous local tufa limestone was used as the main building material and is complemented by 4,750 square meters of landscaping on the wavy, mountain-inspired roofs and 1,500 square meters of living green walls on the facade. Non-standard lawn and native plants were used to vegetate these areas so that the building will change appearance as the seasons change. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects renovate a derelict fire station into Antwerp’s new BREEAM-rated port headquarters The main school building is broken into small sections and contain the administration building, general classrooms, science and art block, and the learning center with the library, IT department, and group presentation rooms. Though modern in appearance, the use of textured masonry, red roofs, and overhanging balconies bring to mind traditional vernacular architecture. The interior is filled with natural light and centered around two atria . Since UWC Dilijan College is built in a seismically active zone, the school is designed with earthquake resistance in mind. A drainage system was installed on-site and retaining walls were built to protect against landslides. + Tim Flynn Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Daniil Kolodin

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Armenias first BREEAM-certified building is an earthquake-resistant international school

RMIT University’s AB2 Building is Wrapped in a Striking Red Mesh Screen

October 16, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of RMIT University’s AB2 Building is Wrapped in a Striking Red Mesh Screen Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , Australia’s Green Building standards , campus architecture , campus design , Ho Chi Minh City Campus , Pentago Spowers , RMIT University , RMIT Vietnam , RMIT’s AB2 expansion , Saigon South Campus , Sustainable Building , university architecture , Urban design , vietnam buildings

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RMIT University’s AB2 Building is Wrapped in a Striking Red Mesh Screen

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