Neubau converts a shipping container into a light-filled porters lodge

August 1, 2018 by  
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Cambridge-based architecture practice Neubau has turned a shipping container into a porters’ lodge and reception center for Hughes Hall, a college that had, until recently, been the only college of the University of Cambridge in England to not have a porters’ lodge. The architects turned to cargotecture as an architectural solution to the client’s brief for a fast and temporary solution that wouldn’t detract from the neighboring Grade II-listed building. Completed in just a little over a month’s time, the repurposed container has planning permission to remain on site for the next five years. The Hughes Hall porters’ lodge is split into three main areas laid out in a linear format: a glazed entrance opens up to a waiting area with a table and chairs and a full-height wall of 476 pigeon holes for the students’ mail; the office and reception is located in the middle; and a spacious storage area for storing parcels is located in the rear. The cargotecture design was selected over initial proposals for a rented modular Portakabin because of the container’s dimensions that fit perfectly at Hughes Hall’s entrance gate. The interior footprint measures approximately 323 square feet. Sections of the converted shipping container were cut out for glazed openings that let in plenty of natural light and views of a newly landscaped garden. The existing doors of the shipping container were preserved and can be opened for easy storage access. The unit is lined with insulation and birch plywood , and the floor is covered in blue vinyl that matches Hughes Halls’ official color. Related: Old shipping container repurposed as a 40-foot-tall parking booth “A shipping container is a ready-made, self-supporting structure that doesn’t require any foundations and is easily customizable to allow for bespoke design,” Alexander Giarlis, Neubau co-founder, told  Dezeen . “It makes a quick to deploy, non-permanent structure that is highly adaptable to a very specific use, responding directly to the client’s brief.” + Neubau Via Dezeen Images by Nick Guttridge

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Neubau converts a shipping container into a light-filled porters lodge

Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

April 11, 2017 by  
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Biology may hold the clues to better batteries . An international team of scientists designed a porous material inspired by the vascular structure of leaves that could make energy transfers more efficient. Similar to the way leaf veins efficiently transport nutrients, this material could help rechargeable batteries perform better and last longer. A team of researchers led by Xianfeng Zheng of China’s Wuhan University of Technology and Australia’s University of Queensland scrutinized the way leaf veins optimize the flow of nutrients, with minimum energy consumption, “by branching out to smaller scales” according to the University of Cambridge , and then applied that to their groundbreaking porous material. The nature-inspired material could help relieve stresses in battery electrodes that currently limit their lifespan. The material could also enhance the charge and discharge process. Related: American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution The team calls their product Murray material after Murray’s Law. Cambridge said according to the rule the whole network of pores in biological systems is connected in a manner “to facilitate the transfer of liquids and minimize resistance throughout the network.” Scientist Bao-Lian Su of Cambridge, Wuhan University of Technology, and University of Namur in Belgium said they applied that biological law to chemistry , saying, “The introduction of the concept of Murray’s Law to industrial processes could revolutionize the design of reactors with highly enhanced efficiency, minimum energy, time, and raw material consumption for a sustainable future.” The scientists applied Murray material to gas sensing and photocatalysis as well. Su is a co-author on a paper published online by Nature Communications late last week. There are seven other co-authors on the paper from institutions in China, Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Another co-author, Tawfique Hasan of Cambridge University, said it could be possible to manufacture the porous material on a large scale. Via the University of Cambridge Images via Christoph Rupprecht on Flickr and Pixabay

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Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

PLP Architecture unveils the design for London’s first timber tower

June 20, 2016 by  
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Architects are finally recognizing the versatility of wood by building innovative timber-framed structures that offer an alternative to traditional steel and concrete construction. Over the last few decades, the trend of building with timber has expanded to include such challenging buildings as high-rises. Now,  PLP Architecture and researchers from the University of Cambridge teamed up to design London’s first timber tower and, if realized, the city’s second tallest building, after The Shard. The 80-story Oakwood Tower will house up to 1,000 new living units. Renderings show two adjoinging structures protruding above the concrete blocks of the Barbican housing estate and its arts center designed in the 1950s. As a lightweight and versatile alternative to traditional construction materials, timber allows for faster constructi PLP Architecture and researchers from the University of Cambridge teamed up to design London’s first timber tower on and lowers carbon emission . Related: Bordeaux’ Canopia tower will be one of the tallest timber frame structures in the world “The use of timber as a structural material in tall buildings is an area of emerging interest for its variety of potential benefits; the most obvious being that it is a renewable resource , unlike prevailing construction methods which use concrete and steel,” said a statement from the University of Cambridge. + PLP Architecture + University of Cambridge Department of Architecture Via Dezeen

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PLP Architecture unveils the design for London’s first timber tower

The world’s oldest polychrome book was so fragile nobody could open it – until now

August 13, 2015 by  
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The world’s oldest polychrome book was so fragile nobody could open it – until now

CUER Unveils Streamlined Sun-Powered Car for the 2013 World Solar Challenge!

November 29, 2012 by  
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Cambridge University Eco Racing just unveiled its revolutionary new solar car , which will be competing in the 2013 World Solar Challenge ! The team blended aerodynamic and solar performance to create an incredibly efficient design. Industry experts from Jaguar Land Rover, investor Hermann Hauser and former principle of Red Bull Racing, Tony Purnell have expressed their confidence that CUER can win next year’s competition. + Cambridge University Eco Racing The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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CUER Unveils Streamlined Sun-Powered Car for the 2013 World Solar Challenge!

Cambridge Team Develops Way to Print Lasers Onto Any Surface Using Everyday Inkjet Technology

September 20, 2012 by  
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A team of scientists from Cambridge University has found a way to print lasers onto virtually any surface using everyday inkjet technology . The UK-based team hopes that their breakthrough will lead to a wide range of applications, including biomedical testing and laser arrays for displays. Read the rest of Cambridge Team Develops Way to Print Lasers Onto Any Surface Using Everyday Inkjet Technology Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: biomedical technology , Cambridge University , Laser , laser printing , laser printing inkjet technology , Printing

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Stanton Williams’ BREEAM Excellent Sainsbury Laboratory Shortlisted for 2012 RIBA Stirling Prize

July 26, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Stanton Williams’ BREEAM Excellent Sainsbury Laboratory Shortlisted for 2012 RIBA Stirling Prize Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , Architecture , BREEAM , breeam excellent rating , Cambridge University , London , RIBA , RIBA Stirling Prize , Stanton Williams

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Stanton Williams’ BREEAM Excellent Sainsbury Laboratory Shortlisted for 2012 RIBA Stirling Prize

LEGO is Helping Cambridge Engineers Grow Synthetic Bone

March 29, 2012 by  
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Designers everywhere continue to wow us with LEGO creations like robotic arms and fully functional printers , and now a group of engineers is even working on using the bright stacking blocks to grow bones! In a  video created for Google’s Science Fair , a team at the University of Cambridge shows us how they are  working on the production of fake bone, and how LEGO Mindstorm cranes are some of the most crucial tools in the process. Read the rest of LEGO is Helping Cambridge Engineers Grow Synthetic Bone Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Cambridge Engineering , Cambridge University , Daniel Strange , Fake Bone , Google Science Fair , lego , Lego Crane , lego mindstorms , lego robots , Michelle Oyne , Scientific Process , Synthetic Bone

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