Modular shed-like addition turns a 1930s bungalow into an open, light-filled home

August 25, 2017 by  
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A 1930s California Bungalow in Sydney received a modern shed-like addition that maximizes the usability of the original structure, adding plenty open-concept space and natural light. Architect Prineas designed the affordable addition as a modular structure that’s easy to build and alter for optimal flexibility, while honoring the original design of the home. The Allen Key House comprises an original 1930s bungalow and an modern, modular addition conceived as a shed-like structure. The latter emphasizes the kitchen and entertaining areas and acts as the true heart of the home. Related: A translucent room fills this beautifully renovated brick house with daylight The design team made sure that the existing bungalow is kept in its original state. They connected the original structure and the addition with a glazed link which creates two internal courtyards and introduces more natural light into the en suite and study. Related: Timber-clad Cut-away Roof House in Sydney puts a modern spin on traditional pitched roofs Built on an extremely tight budget, the rear addition relies on a grid system that forms double-height spaces through modular design. This system of modules allows simple reconfiguration of courtyards, light wells and stairs. + Architect Prineas Via Architizer Photos by Chris Warnes

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Modular shed-like addition turns a 1930s bungalow into an open, light-filled home

Teslas electric truck will have a 200-300 mile range

August 25, 2017 by  
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More details have been obtained about the Tesla semi truck, which is set to be unveiled next month. According to Reuters , the big rig will have a working range of 200 to 300 miles. Tesla CEO Elon Musk is also considering developing an electric tractor trailer to accompany the vehicle. Scott Perry of Ryder, a fleet operator in Florida, told Reuters that Tesla is building “an electric big-rig known as a ‘day cab’ with no sleeper berth, capable of traveling about 200 to 300 miles with a typical payload before recharging.” It is possible Perry has seen the truck first-hand, as Elon Musk mentioned in June that he would be gathering feedback from the trucking industry. At a meeting with Tesla shareholders, Musk said “We’re getting them closely involved in the design process, so the biggest customers of the heavy duty Tesla semi are helping ensure that it is specified to their needs, so it’s not a mystery. They already know that it’s going to meet their needs, because they’ve told us what those needs are. So it’ll really just be a question of scaling volume to make as many as we can.” A conventional semi truck can travel over 1,000 miles on a single tank of fuel. This means the Tesla version will have a substantially lower range. To make up for this, Elon Musk is considering developing an electric tractor trailer. Now, he and his team just need to make sure the technology is feasible. Even if Tesla’s big rig doesn’t surpass 300 miles, there is still likely to be a market for it. Approximately 30 percent of US trucking jobs are regional trips of 100 to 200 miles, according to Sandeep Kar, the chief strategy officer of Toronto -based Fleet Complete. “As long as (Musk) can break 200 miles he can claim his truck is ’long haul’ and he will be technically right,” said Kar. The fact that the vehicle will have self-driving technology is an added benefit. Read more: Solar-powered Tesla Tiny House hits the road in Australia Transportation firms are also interested in acquiring electric semi-trucks, as they are less costly to maintain than conventional vehicles. Energy from the grid is also less expensive than diesel . The main challenge is ensuring the big rig’s battery doesn’t take up precious cargo space. When Tesla was pressed for comment via email, a spokesman replied, “Tesla’s policy is to always decline to comment on speculation, whether true or untrue, as doing so would be silly. Silly!” Tesla isn’t the only automobile manufacturer seeking to expand into the trucking industry. Reportedly, Daimler , the largest truck manufacturer in the world, will begin production this year on an electric delivery truck. The big rig will have a driving range of 100 miles and will be able to carry a payload of 9,400 pounds, or about 1,000 pounds less than its diesel counterpart. + Tesla Via Reuters , The Verge Images via Tesla

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Teslas electric truck will have a 200-300 mile range

Australian facility aims to produce 50,000 metric tons of building material from CO2 by 2020

August 25, 2017 by  
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Mineral Carbonation International wants to transform Carbon dioxide emissions into useful building materials . The Australian firm just unveiled a pilot plant at the Newcastle Institute for Energy and Resources that will attempt to mimic, but speed up, the weathering process by which rainfall produces rocks . MCi launched their technology with a demonstration of their process to transform CO2 into building products. They capture the CO2 from mining company Orica’s Kooragang Island operations. According to The Guardian, CO2 bonds with the rock serpentinite to create solid carbonates in an hour-long process. On their website, MCi says the material could potentially be used for cement , bricks, or plasterboards. Related: Why 2,000-year-old Roman concrete is stronger than our own At the same site at the University of Newcastle , a first-generation batch plant has been operating since 2016, but the university described this new semi-continuous pilot plant as the first of its kind, and said with both plants running MCi will be able to conduct research to hone the process and generate materials for testing. MCi hopes to be generating 20,000 to 50,000 metric tons of the material for use in building by 2020. MCi CEO Marcus Dawe said in a statement, “We need solutions to climate change . We need technology that is ready and tested by the time we have solved the pricing of carbon in our economy. Like the adoption of renewables in energy production, our technology aims to help decarbonize industries like cement, steel, and chemical production.” University of Melbourne geologist Peter Cook said MCi has shown the technology works chemically, but it may not offer a single solution to the large issue of climate change. He told The Guardian, “I think it’s one of these processes where you’ll be able to make money from it in the local area. The difficulty is, for instance we’re getting 36 billion tonnes of CO2 per annum from our use of fossil fuel .” He did say he didn’t want to diminish the great value in MCi’s work. + Mineral Carbonation International Via The Guardian and University of Newcastle Images via Orica and University of Newcastle

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Australian facility aims to produce 50,000 metric tons of building material from CO2 by 2020

Better Place and GE to Target Commercial Fleets for EV Testing

September 24, 2010 by  
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Better Place, the high-profile Californian firm working on a new model for recharging electric vehicles, last week pulled off another major coup, inking a technology and financing deal with GE that should accelerate the roll-out of its battery recharging infrastructure.

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Better Place and GE to Target Commercial Fleets for EV Testing

Rooftop Solar Installations Growing Faster than Utility-Scale Solar

January 10, 2010 by  
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Private solar installations are really taking off nationwide. In just two years, (about the same length of time it takes to get a pair of 250 MW solar power plants approved in California, for example), homeowners and businesses have added that much power to the Californian grid, just from individual rooftops throughout the state. By July last year, 50,000 installations were supplying the California grid with 500 MW of solar power; the equivalent of two average sized solar power plants now under review in the state.

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Rooftop Solar Installations Growing Faster than Utility-Scale Solar

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