Energy commissioners on the coming decarbonization

December 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Energy commissioners on the coming decarbonization

The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Tim Echols of Georgia and Michael Picker of California spark a lively exchange on power.

See the rest here:
Energy commissioners on the coming decarbonization

This result is of cosmic significance, says scientist of new form of matter

December 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This result is of cosmic significance, says scientist of new form of matter

Physicists at the University of Illinois have announced they have discovered a new form of matter known as excitonium. Although theorized more than half a century ago, excitonium was only recently confirmed in experiments by the research team, which also included scientists from University of California at Berkeley, and University of Amsterdam. Excitonium is composed of a type of boson, a composite particle whose unique qualities enable the new form of matter to serve as a superconductor, superfluid, or an insulating electronic crystal. In this regard, it could be used to bolster existing technologies, aid the development of new ones, or help to bring clarity to some of the most vexing mysteries of quantum mechanics. Excitonium is composed of excitons, a combination of electrons and the empty “holes” left by empty electron states. When in an excited state, electrons on the edge of an energy level in an atom can jump to a different energy level , leaving a “hole” behind. This hole then acts with a positive force, trying to pull the negatively charged electron back to its original space. While scientists had envisioned such a state of matter , they were only recently able to identify it through a novel technique. Their work was documented in a study published in the journal Science . Related: Scientists locate half of the universe’s missing ordinary matter Although further study is needed, the implications of excitonium’s demonstrated existence is substantial. “This result is of cosmic significance,” said study co-author and University of Illinois Professor Peter Abbamonte in a press release. “Ever since the term ‘excitonium’ was coined in the 1960s by Harvard theoretical physicist Bert Halperin, physicists have sought to demonstrate its existence… Since the 1970s, many experimentalists have published evidence of the existence of excitonium, but their findings weren’t definitive proof and could equally have been explained by a conventional structural phase transition.” Via Futurism Images via  Peter Abbamonte/U. of I. Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and  L. Brian Stauffer/University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Here is the original:
This result is of cosmic significance, says scientist of new form of matter

Wildfires in California now larger than NYC and Boston combined

December 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Wildfires in California now larger than NYC and Boston combined

The wildfires raging throughout Southern California are now so fierce and widespread they cover a land area larger than Boston and New York City combined. The Thomas Fire, the largest of the six blazes, covers 230,000 acres, making it the fifth largest wildfire in modern Californian history. Firefighters are struggling to make progress against the inferno, with containment of the Thomas Fire shrinking from 15 percent to 10 percent on Sunday. The fire’s spread has been aided by powerful, dry Santa Ana winds and a lack of rainfall , which are fairly typical of the Southern California coastal region. “Every single year, we have ideal conditions for the types of wildfires we’re experiencing,” ecologist Alexandra Syphard at the Conservation Biology Institute told Wired . “What we don’t have every single year is an ignition during a wind event. And we’ve had several.” Related: The fearless dog who refused to leave his goats during the Santa Rosa wildfire “The problem is not fire,” Syphard added. “The problem is people in the wrong places.” While wildfires were a normal occurrence before the development of Los Angeles and the rest of Southern California, they would typically only occur once or twice a year. Human activity in one of the most populous regions in the United States has increased the rate of wildfires, which has damaged the local ecology. “We’ve lost a lot of our natural heritage [to wildfires],” US Geological Survey research ecologist Jon Keeley told Wired . As the effects of climate change continue to become more pronounced and powerful, these ferocious wildfires may become ordinary occurrences. “With climate change, some scientists are saying that Southern California is literally burning up,” said California Governor Jerry Brown, “so we have to have the resources to combat the fires and we also have to invest in managing the vegetation and forests … in a place that’s getting hotter.” Via CNN and Wired Images via Depositphotos , US Fish and Wildlife Services  and Glenn Beltz/Flickr

Go here to read the rest:
Wildfires in California now larger than NYC and Boston combined

Toyota is building a giant power station that turns biowaste into hydrogen fuel

December 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Toyota is building a giant power station that turns biowaste into hydrogen fuel

Toyota is building a massive power plant that will churn out 1.2 tons of hydrogen every single day. That’s enough for the daily driving needs of almost 1,500 cars . They described the project as the “world’s first megawatt-scale carbonate fuel cell power generation plant” – and it will allow them to power their operations at the Long Beach Port entirely with renewable energy . The Tri-Gen facility in Long Beach will generate around 2.35 megawatts of electricity when it switches online in 2020. The generation station itself will be 100 percent renewable – it will transform California agricultural waste into hydrogen, electricity, and water. FuelCell Energy developed the Tri-Gen technology. Related: Toyota’s new Texas headquarters will get 25% of its power from the sun Toyota views the power plant as a major step towards a hydrogen society. Hydrogen from Tri-Gen will power fuel cell vehicles moving through the Long Beach Port – including Mirai sedans and Toyota’s heavy duty truck known as Project Portal. Group vice president for strategic planning Doug Murtha said in a statement, “For more than twenty years, Toyota has been leading the development of fuel cell technology because we understand the tremendous potential to reduce emissions and improve society.” The power plant fits in with Toyota’s goal to reach net zero carbon dioxide emissions as part of their Environmental Challenge 2050 . Toyota’s Environmental Challenge 2050 also includes goals for promoting next-generation zero-emissions cars, cutting down on water use, and building a recycling -based society. In their statement, Toyota reiterated their commitment to expanding hydrogen infrastructure. There are currently 31 retail hydrogen fueling stations in California, and Toyota has partnered with Shell – the first such collaboration between an oil and a car company – to develop new hydrogen stations. + Toyota Images via Toyota and FuelCell Energy

Read the rest here:
Toyota is building a giant power station that turns biowaste into hydrogen fuel

‘Galapagos of North America’ – Mexico creates massive marine reserve

November 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on ‘Galapagos of North America’ – Mexico creates massive marine reserve

In a huge win for the environment, Mexico’s government just announced the creation of a massive marine reserve in an area known as the ‘Galapagos of North America.’ Aimed at protecting and preserving the precious environment around the Revillagigedo Archipelago near Baja California, the Illinois-sized reserve will be the largest of its kind for the continent. The 57,143-square-mile reserve will go a long way towards protecting the humpbacks, migratory birds, rays, turtles, endangered fish and coral reefs that call the area home. With the designation, all hotel construction, fishing, and mining are banned. The reserve sits 242 miles south-west of the Baja California peninsula and contains four volcanic islands and a submerged volcanic mountain range. Related: We created enough marine reserves last year to cover Texas and Alaska combined President Enrique Pena Nieto made the announcement on Friday, pushing back against significant opposition from the commercial fishing industry, saying that Mexico is reaffirming its “commitment to the preservation of the heritage of Mexico and the world”. The area will be policed by the Mexican Navy, a move that helps to silence critics that say marine reserves aren’t adequately patrolled. It’s worth noting that while Mexico is making a commitment to protecting priceless places, Trump is considering shrinking the Rose Atoll and the Pacific Remote Islands, two national monuments that could be opened to fishing. Con el Decreto del Parque Nacional Revillagigedo, el @gobmx reafirma su compromiso con la conservación del patrimonio de @Mexico y el mundo. pic.twitter.com/RNfTruK6XM — Enrique Peña Nieto (@EPN) November 25, 2017 Via The Guardian Lead image via Deposit Photos , image via Wikimedia

View post:
‘Galapagos of North America’ – Mexico creates massive marine reserve

Tesla aims to ramp up Solar Roof production in Buffalo next year

November 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tesla aims to ramp up Solar Roof production in Buffalo next year

Tesla’s Solar Roof could be seen on more homes as the company plans to increase production in 2018. They said in a letter to shareholders they’ll be moving production from their Fremont, California factory to the Gigafactory 2 in Buffalo , New York. According to Inverse , Elon Musk provided for the first time a concrete timeframe for ramping up production, during a recent conference call, to allow for more customer installations. Tesla plans to start manufacturing more Solar Roofs soon. In a Wednesday conference call, chief technology officer JB Straubel said they are “on track to turn on most of the production line in Buffalo by the end of the year.” In the shareholder letter, Musk and chief financial officer Deepak Ahuja said as they move production to Buffalo, energy generation with the Solar Roofs will become a larger part of Tesla’s business in 2018. Related: A Tesla solar roof rotates to naturally cool this desert home in Iran Tesla has deployed less solar capacity in the third quarter than one year ago: 109 megawatts (MW) as opposed to 187 MW. In the letter, Musk and Ahuja said, “The lower developments are in large part a result of deliberately deemphasizing commercial and industrial solar energy projects with low profit and limited cash generation.” As they make the move from Fremont to Buffalo, they said in the letter Solar Roof installations will increase slowly at first, but “as we fine tune and standardize the production and installation process, we expect to ramp Solar Roof production considerably in 2018.” Musk and Ahuja affirmed Musk’s vision for pursuing renewable energy – over ten years ago, Musk said in his first master plan Tesla aimed to provide “ zero emission electric power generation options.” In this recent letter the two executives said sustainable energy – and storing it – are crucial components of the company’s mission “and will drive long-term revenue growth and profits.” Via The Buffalo News and Inverse Images via Tesla

View original post here: 
Tesla aims to ramp up Solar Roof production in Buffalo next year

US govt scientist denied approval to discuss link between climate change and severe fires

November 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on US govt scientist denied approval to discuss link between climate change and severe fires

Is the United States government blocking scientists from talking about climate change ? Forest Service research ecologist William Jolly was slated to give a presentation titled “Climate-Induced Variations in Global Severe Fire Weather Conditions” at the International Fire Congress – but was denied approval to go to the conference. And the Environmental Protection Agency recently reportedly blocked three scientists from talking about climate change at a Rhode Island event. Jolly, who works at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Montana, was going to give a 30-minute talk in Florida at the November 28 through December 2 conference hosted by the Association for Fire Ecology (AFE). According to Scientific American , critics are saying Donald Trump’s administration is suppressing the spread of science paid for by taxpayers. The Department of Agriculture , parent agency of the Forest Service, said regional managers mostly determine who will attend conferences based partly on available financial resources, and that political appointees do have the final word but don’t tend to weigh in on which people are chosen. Related: US DOI scientist claims he was reassigned for speaking up on climate change Spokesperson Mike Illenberg said in a statement, “Our front line supervisors and managers weigh a variety of factors including cost, frequency of employee travel, conference location, the number of other employees attending, among other factors in making our business decisions about conference attendance. Based on their recommendations and resource availability, Forest Service leadership gives final approval.” Researchers with the Rocky Mountain Research Station’s Human Dimensions Science Program were also denied travel authorizations – one was Karin Riley, AFE’s board of directors’ vice president, who researches the relationship between wildfires and climate. Three scientists from the United States Geological Survey scheduled to speak about climate change at the wildfire conference are still waiting for a response on their travel requests. Firefighters United for Safety, Ethics, and Ecology executive director Timothy Ingalsbee said, “While the number of acres burned, homes destroyed, civilians killed, and tax dollars spent on suppression are going way up, why is the number of Forest Service scientists and managers meeting at professional science conferences and technical training workshops going way down?” Via Scientific American Images via Bureau of Land Management California on Flickr and Depositphotos

The rest is here: 
US govt scientist denied approval to discuss link between climate change and severe fires

Stanford’s new accelerator on a chip could revolutionize medical care

October 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Stanford’s new accelerator on a chip could revolutionize medical care

Researchers at Stanford University are developing a linear accelerator that is the size of a chip — instead of two miles long — and it could herald a medical breakthrough. Linear accelerators are commonly used for external beam radiation treatments for patients with cancer . However, only a handful have been constructed as they are very expensive to build, maintain and operate. Stanford’s accelerator on a chip could provide every hospital with access to this life-saving technology. Standford’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory houses a linear accelerator that measures 3.2 kilometers in length. Because it emits radiation , it’s buried 25 feet under the hills of northern California. Dubbed LINAC, it relies on klystrons to generate high-energy electron beams. At one end of the line, electrons are generated. They are then accelerated to 99.99999 percent of the speed of light and zip down the 2-mile long instrument. The setup is expensive, however – which is why scientists in the same lab are working to create an accelerator small enough to fit in a large shoebox. After receiving a $13.5 million grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation in 2015, the “accelerator on a chip” (ACHIP) project was born. When the project launched in 2013, SLAC physicist Joel England said: “Making them much smaller and cheaper would democratize accelerators , potentially making them available to millions of people. We can’t even imagine the creative applications they would find for this technology .” The minuscule device would work similarly to the LINAC. However instead of shooting electrons down a copper vacuum tube, they would be pushed along with microwaves. Engadget reports, “The AoaC will shove electrons through a precisely-engineered silica chip, smaller than a grain of rice, and excite them with laser beams.” Related: Japanese ‘mutant’ chickens are laying eggs with cancer-fighting drugs By adjusting the width of the ridges in the channel, with respect to the wavelength of the laser, the chip’s acceleration gradient could be tuned to a whopping 700 megavolts per meter (MeV/m). That’s ten times what the LINAC can generate. The inexpensive device could replace multimillion-dollar radiotherapy machines in hospitals – and it could be paired with a simple fiber laser power source to “burn out” tumors faster than traditional radiation therapy — and without the need for anesthesia. Said Joel England, SLAC’s lead researcher for this program, “Once you get into a million electron volts or more then you’re sort of in the regime of where you can have practical applications; where something like a medical accelerator is more viable. So typically for cancer treatment, you’re using particles with between one and 20 million electron volts of energy.” He explained in 2013, “We still have a number of challenges before this technology becomes practical for real-world use, but eventually it would substantially reduce the size and cost of future high-energy particle colliders for exploring the world of fundamental particles and forces.” + SLAC Via Engadget Images via Stanford University

Go here to see the original: 
Stanford’s new accelerator on a chip could revolutionize medical care

Medicine drum woman builds beautiful earth home village in Joshua Tree, California

October 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Medicine drum woman builds beautiful earth home village in Joshua Tree, California

If you’ve ever wanted to stay in an earthbag dome home , here’s your chance. When Lisa Starr first purchased land in Joshua Tree, California, she wasn’t thinking about vacation rentals. Instead, the artist and drum medicine woman sought a place not too far from the coast where she could build a sustainable life for herself. After deciding to build in accordance with the Iranian architect Nader Khalili’s affordable and disaster-resilient superadobe methodology, she recruited volunteers and CalEarth alumni to first work on a few practice domes that eventually evolved into the “village” that can be booked through Airbnb. This extra income comes as an unplanned perk, but her real dream – to pursue her work as an artist – required building a couple more domes. After completing the practice homes, Starr and her crew of interns, volunteers and CalEarth alumni worked on her personal space – a 1,360 square foot dome home two connecting hallways. The 18″ thick walls, comprised of 15 percent cement and 85 percent earth, provide the thermal mass to keep the buildings cool in the summer and warm in the winter, according to her Facebook page . Starr told Inhabitat she believes in sticking with “traditional Nader” – focusing on being creative with smaller structures rather than 20- to 30-foot domes. Khalili, who founded CalEarth to share his design and life philosophy with others, promoted sustainable homes that could be built with materials found on site. And that’s exactly what Starr was able to accomplish. She says she sourced 75 percent of the materials used in her dome structure from her own land. Related: Build your own disaster-proof home with materials of war While her home is private, guests have access to a “rustic yet luxurious camp-like experience” in the village. With expansive views and open skies day and night, “star gazing is a must,” says Starr. The village includes two 8-foot “Sleep Pod Earth Dome” structures with storage or a cave-like space for a child to sleep in. Each pod, which comes with a full size mattress, bedding and solar-powered ceiling light, can accommodate up to a family of four. In winter, tea light heaters keep the space warm at night. The communal area includes a shaded outdoor kitchen and kiva fire pits, along with a shower house and outhouse complete with a flushing toilet and sink. Guests are encouraged to bring their own bottles to refill with potable water available on site. Now Starr is working on building another 12-foot dome structure to use as a studio, honing in on her original intention. She has been living at Bonita Domes for four years now, and though it comes with its challenges, she says her dream has catapulted forward. + Bonita Domes on Facebook + Bonita Domes on Airbnb Images via Bonita Domes and Dylan Magaster

View post: 
Medicine drum woman builds beautiful earth home village in Joshua Tree, California

How volcanic eruptions in Iceland and Alaska affected ancient Egyptians

October 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on How volcanic eruptions in Iceland and Alaska affected ancient Egyptians

Volcano eruptions could have helped precipitate unrest in ancient Egypt , according to a new study. An international team of researchers led by Joseph Manning of Yale University discovered volcanic eruptions in northern latitudes can impact the flow of the Nile River . Ancient peoples depended on Nile River flooding to irrigate crops, and if that flood didn’t happen, there could have been political or economic consequences. The researchers connected historical analysis with paleoclimatology – what Yale described as reconstruction of global climates in the past – to make the startling find. Volcanoes in Russia, Greenland, Iceland, or Alaska could have disrupted the daily lives of people in ancient Egypt. While volcanic eruptions weren’t the sole cause of unrest, the researchers think they did play a role. In years with volcanic eruptions, the Nile didn’t flood as much, which Manning said led to social stress. He told The Washington Post, “It’s a bizarre concept that Alaskan volcanoes were screwing up the Nile, but in fact that’s what happened.” Related: The world’s mightiest river is dying Manning and colleagues took an interdisciplinary approach, scrutinizing ancient papyri and inscriptions for descriptions of Nile flooding, and combining that historical information with climate modeling of big 20th century volcanic eruptions and yearly Nile summer flood height measurements between 622 and 1902. Manning told The Washington Post, “It’s an indirect response, but because of atmospheric circulation and energy budgets, we find that large volcanic eruptions cause droughts .” He described the Nile and Egypt as sensitive instruments for climate change , and said the research was important in today’s debate on climate change. The study offers new insight into how climatic shocks impacted societies in history. Manning said in a statement, “There hasn’t been a large eruption affecting the global climate system since Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines in 1991…Sooner or later we will experience a large volcanic eruption, and perhaps a cluster of them, that will act to exacerbate drought in sensitive parts of the world.” The journal Nature Communications published the study online this month. Five other researchers, from institutions in Ireland, California, and Switzerland, contributed to the work. Via Yale University and The Washington Post Images via Michael Gwyther-Jones on Flickr and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Flickr

Excerpt from: 
How volcanic eruptions in Iceland and Alaska affected ancient Egyptians

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 870 access attempts in the last 7 days.