Taking a stand against climate change, the Golden Globes goes vegan

January 7, 2020 by  
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This weekend, the 77th annual Golden Globes, which took place at the Beverly Hilton in California’s celebrated Beverly Hills, made history by becoming the first major awards show to go vegan . Only two weeks ago, the previewed menu was set to feature the customary sea bass course, but a last-minute switch changed the course to feature 100 percent plant-based fare in an effort to “raise environmental awareness about food consumption and waste ,” according to the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). “We had the menu with fish. Then we got together with the HFPA, and they wanted to make this change to send a good message,” said Matthew Morgan, Beverly Hilton’s executive chef. “It’s definitely the first Golden Globes that has gone vegan.” Related: Study shows how plant-based catering can greatly reduce events’ carbon footprints What was on the revised meatless menu? The appetizer was chilled golden beet soup with chervil and amaranth. For the new entree, king oyster mushrooms cooked to resemble “scallops” was served on wild mushroom risotto alongside roasted baby purple carrots, Brussels sprouts and pea tendrils. The dessert was a vegan version of an opera cake. Other sustainability touches were also championed by the HFPA during the Golden Globes. For instance, the HFPA has been reusing its red carpet at other events. The organization has also partnered with Icelandic Glacial, a naturally alkaline and sustainably sourced natural spring water supplier. The water was served in glass bottles, with paper straws available, to help reduce single-use plastic waste. “The climate crisis is surrounding us, and we were thinking about the New Year and the new decade. So we started talking between us about what we can do to send a signal,” explained Lorenzo Soria, the HFPA president. “We don’t think we’ll change the world with one meal, but we decided to take small steps to bring awareness. The food we eat, the way it is processed and grown and disposed of, all of that contributes to the climate crisis.” A fair share of Hollywood celebrities are already vegan, vegetarian or following raw vegetable-based diets, and they were supportive of the plant-based menu. With the Golden Globes being the first big awards show of the year, it will be exciting to see the eco-conscious precedent it will set for the rest of 2020. Actor Mark Ruffalo tweeted, “Our industry leads by example. Vegetarian food is delicious and healthy and reduces greenhouse gases about as much as driving electric cars. The HFPA should be commended for this, and all the other awards shows should follow suit.” + Golden Globes Via TreeHugger , Hollywood Reporter and Associated Press Image via Shutterstock

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Taking a stand against climate change, the Golden Globes goes vegan

The future of building is communities that are all-electric and ultra-efficient

December 19, 2019 by  
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From Utah to Texas to California, these homes are changing the way we think about the built environment.

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The future of building is communities that are all-electric and ultra-efficient

Costco is now selling Beyond Burgers in bulk

December 10, 2019 by  
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Those who love the plant-based Beyond Burgers can now rejoice — Costco, a chain of warehouse club stores, is now selling them in bulk at select locations. The roll-out started in Florida, New York and Texas, then followed in Arizona, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Virginia and more, with eight-patty packs selling for about $15. In most grocery stores, a two-pack of the burgers retails for about $6. What’s in a Beyond Burger? While it looks, cooks, sizzles and somewhat tastes like a beef patty, Beyond Burger sources its proteins from pea, mung bean, fava bean, brown rice and sunflower. One patty contains 20 grams of protein, but it does not contain any cholesterol, a fact that has helped propel Beyond Meat as one of the largest vegan meat producers in the market. Earlier this year, the company became the first vegan meat brand to launch an IPO, catapulting its startup valuation to $3.9 billion. Related: Impossible Burger is now available in grocery stores Projections estimate the global plant-based market to bring in upward of $140 billion over the next decade as more health- and eco-conscious consumers reduce meat from their diets. Global concerns over industrial animal farming’s impact on the environment and climate are similarly shifting consumer choices, since livestock emerged as a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions and the correlative burdens to land, water and energy. The popularity of plant-based foods is now compelling some of the leading U.S. meat producers to explore and invest in plant-based protein. For instance, Tyson Foods, once an investor in Beyond Meat, will also debut its own line of meatless products in the next few years to meet changing consumer demands. Then there’s Hormel Foods, which has recently unveiled its “plant-forward” vegan meat line called Happy Little Plants, with a flagship product that is soy-based and gluten-free with no preservatives or cholesterol. Besides the Beyond Burgers from Beyond Meat, Costco likewise stocks vegan meat selections from Nestle’s Awesome Burger and even Don Lee Farms’ organic and gluten-free Better Than Beef burger products. + Beyond Meat Via CNN Images via Beyond Meat

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Costco is now selling Beyond Burgers in bulk

A family builds an impressive, 300-square-foot tiny home to travel the world

December 3, 2019 by  
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It’s the freedom to travel that continues to push the tiny home trend. Families like Bela, Spencer and their young daughter, Escher, are able to enjoy a minimalist lifestyle while also exploring the world whenever they get the urge to get up and go. What’s more, this family’s custom tiny home on wheels , as functional as it is beautiful, features all of the creature comforts of a contemporary home. Bela and Spencer began their love affair with tiny home living on their honeymoon, where they spent a few days off the grid in a quaint cottage in Appalachia. The experience stayed with them for years, even as they found themselves paying a whopping $2,300 a month to rent a studio apartment in Redwood City years later. Related: Newlyweds forgo pricey wedding to embark on an incredible tiny home adventure Wanting a better life that would allow them to travel with their new addition, baby Escher, the couple decided to embark on a DIY tiny home project. Once they located an idyllic spot in the mountains of Santa Cruz, California, they got to work building the tiny home of their dreams. The couple decided to approach each design step by focusing on spatial awareness and functionality instead of the limited square footage. This focus allowed them to create functional, custom spaces that best suited their own needs as a family. The finished tiny home on wheels features an expansive, open-air deck, complete with a comfortable lounge space, dining set and barbecue grill. The family spends quite a bit of time here, enjoying the views and fresh mountain air. The entrance is through a glass garage door that opens vertically and connects the interior to the front deck. Interestingly, the interior layout was designed to have nine distinct living spaces, each one separated from the other by either a difference in level (steps or a ladder) or a soft partition of some sort (glass door, curtain or shoji paper). This strategy allows each section to have a unique purpose. The ground floor features a living room and high-top dining table that looks out a window over the landscape. The fully equipped kitchen, with a striking copper backsplash, is elevated off the ground by a short staircase that slides out of the wall to create storage space . Behind the kitchen is the master bedroom, which, like the rest of the home, benefits from an abundance of natural light. The queen-sized bed is built on hydraulic lids, enabling it to fold up to reveal more storage underneath. On the other side of the home, a spacious bathroom with a composting toilet features a lovely, spa-like shower stall. Above this area is an L-shaped loft accessible by a ladder. This upper level houses two distinct spaces: an extra bedroom and storage. + This X Life Via Living Big in a Tiny House Photography by Bela Fishbeyn; family photos by Ryan Tuttle

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A family builds an impressive, 300-square-foot tiny home to travel the world

Dutch company collects plastic pollution from rivers to make parks and products

December 3, 2019 by  
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Plastic pollution is a worldwide problem, with piles of debris along coastlines, on roadsides, in landfills and floating in waterways. Environmentally conscious companies are looking for ways to clean up the mess while simultaneously seeking out methods to recycle plastic waste into other products. One Dutch company, The Recycled Island Foundation (RIF), is tackling both problems with one solution — Litter Traps. According to the RIF website, the motivation for the project came from the knowledge that our waterways are part of global ecosystem, where everybody benefits or pays the consequences of waste management . “Plastic pollutes our seas and oceans and has a direct and deadly effect on marine life,” the foundation said. “Thousands of birds, seals, turtles, whales and other marine animals are killed every year after ingesting plastic or getting strangled in it. With the plastics breaking down into smaller particles, it also enters the human food chain.” Related: This floating park in Rotterdam is made from recycled plastic waste Knowing that the majority of ocean pollution comes from rivers that lead out to sea, RIF decided to stop plastic waste before it could travel that far. The foundation’s Litter Traps are aptly named. Sourced from recycled plastic themselves, the traps filter water, collect plastic and stop that plastic from traveling downstream. The collected plastic is then made into durable floating parks, seating elements, building materials and even more Litter Traps. The passive design of the Litter Trap allows it to float in the river, harbor or port, catching plastic once it floats inside the trap. The system does not rely on any energy source. Once full, the trap is emptied, and the usable plastic is sorted. The plastic then heads into manufacturing, where it is turned into a variety of products. This circular system allows the company to collect materials, clean up the rivers and make products without waste and at a minimal cost. The RIF has been busy collecting plastic from local waterways for some time. More than one year ago, it opened a prototype in Rotterdam, the Netherlands called the Recycled Park. This floating park is made entirely from recycled plastic gathered from the nearby Meuse River. You can read more about that project here . The initial park prototype is an example of how recycled plastic can be used to replicate the marine ecosystem, complete with live plants above and below the park that animals such as snails, flatworms, larva, beetles and fish call home. What began as a local movement has gone international. New Litter Traps are being manufactured to tackle river waste around the world. Belgium and Indonesia were the first countries to adopt the RIF approach, and the organization is now preparing similar projects in Vietnam, France, the Philippines, Brazil and more. As an example of how the mechanism performs, a single Litter Trap located in Belgium is emptied twice a week, and the average amount of waste collected is 1.5 cubic meters per month. The goal is to continue to expand the use of Litter Traps to divert plastic from the oceans on a large scale. The future of the Litter Trap is bright, with plans to make portable Litter Traps and Litter Traps that can collect and hold larger quantities of plastic before needing emptied. Now partnering with international companies, RIF hopes to create products that are in high demand in the areas where the plastic is collected. RIF is working with innovators to turn the plastic into a durable and easy-to-assemble housing material. It is also looking into large-scale, 3D-printing options using the marine plastic. For example, the company offers custom couches made entirely from salvaged marine plastic that is 3D-printed into shape. RIF feels knowledge is power in the campaign for plastic reduction, so it has implemented an educational program that includes ways to reduce plastic consumption, information about proper recycling techniques and an opportunity to participate in clean-up efforts. It hopes to continue to inspire action and raise awareness about the problem by visiting schools and organizing community events. When it comes to environmental efforts , the more hands involved in projects, the better. RIF has partnered with dozens of agencies with similar goals, creating a village of like-minded companies hoping to lead the way toward better plastic management and the creation of durable, reusable products. + The Recycled Island Foundation Images via The Recycled Island Foundation

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Dutch company collects plastic pollution from rivers to make parks and products

Policy leaders offer gutsy talk on climate hope and progress

November 18, 2019 by  
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Outspoken policymakers, present and past, urged for more aggressive action on climate at VERGE 19 in Oakland, California.

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Policy leaders offer gutsy talk on climate hope and progress

How US colonialism affects Indigenous peoples’ stewardship and access to food

November 9, 2019 by  
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From ceremonies to harvesting and food storage, to political leadership, to gender relations, indigenous groups have detailed understandings of how design societal institutions to support resilience. But colonialism changed that.

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How US colonialism affects Indigenous peoples’ stewardship and access to food

California’s Advanced Clean Truck Rule is not strong enough to ensure a cleaner future

November 5, 2019 by  
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A 2019 report shows seven of the top ten most ozone-choked cities in America are in California.

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California’s Advanced Clean Truck Rule is not strong enough to ensure a cleaner future

Are we nearing ‘peak car’?

November 5, 2019 by  
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People are increasingly realizing driving is no longer fun nor convenient, and investors should take note.

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Are we nearing ‘peak car’?

How Nasdaq is using data to enhance ESG disclosure in capital markets

November 5, 2019 by  
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A Q&A with the global head of sustainability for the stock tracker.

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How Nasdaq is using data to enhance ESG disclosure in capital markets

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