This timber-clad cabin appears to hover over an idyllic lake landscape

September 3, 2020 by  
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Rye-based architectural practice RX Architects has completed a charming cabin at the edge of a lake in Brabourne, an English village within the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty about a two-hour drive from London. Dubbed the Lake Cabin, the gabled nature retreat is wrapped in natural wood that will develop a patina over time to help blend the building into the landscape. The remote cabin can only be accessed by a woodland trail, which is inaccessible by vehicles and enjoys uninterrupted views across the lake and to the countryside beyond. Positioned to face north, the Lake Cabin sits at the southern edge of the lake against a backdrop of dense forest. Connection with nature was paramount in the design, which features a natural materials palette, large walls of glazing and a wooden deck that cantilevers over the water. The gabled building is clad in a combination of rough sawn, wide English oak planks as well as thin, narrow-planed English oak planks. “This is combined with a concrete datum line to the base of the building, which steps up to create a concrete bench and log store,” the architects added. Related: A homey, floating cabin makes for the ultimate romantic getaway in South Australia The pared-back design approach continues to the interior of the exposed timber-framed structure, which is covered in limed Douglas fir boards. A bronze seamed roof tops the building for a visual contrast with the timber cladding. The roof extends over the southern and western elevations to provide the L-shaped, cantilevered deck some protection from the elements and unwanted solar gain. Two walls of sliding glass along the south and west sides of the home open up to the deck and create a seamless indoor/outdoor experience with the lake. Like the architectural design, the interior layout is also restrained and centers on a large, open-plan living area, dining space and kitchen that connects with the outdoor deck. A wet room is tucked away near the main entrance, and stairs and a ladder lead up to a lofted sleeping area above.  + RX Architects Photography by Ashley Gendek via RX Architects

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This timber-clad cabin appears to hover over an idyllic lake landscape

Check out this handmade wood cabin in North Carolina

August 3, 2020 by  
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This 400-square-foot cabin, nicknamed The Nook, can be found in the charming, forested area of Swannanoa, North Carolina, just outside of Asheville. The project was a labor of love by owner and professional photographer Mike Belleme, who built the cabin himself along with a rotating crew of local community craftspeople. Even better, he used locally sourced materials in the construction, milling some of the wood himself from fallen trees on the property. The spacious cabin’s 18-foot ceilings help provide plenty of opportunity for natural light. This is only magnified by its large windows and open design, which was executed by local firm Shelter Design Studio. With a special breakfast alcove, a tea loft and dedicated lofts for entertainment and sleeping, it is easy to see how The Nook got its name. In an effort to take the cabin’s simple form and enhance it with as many distinct zones (or “nooks”) as possible, the Asheville-based studio has achieved a unique and thoughtful space with lots of room for lounging and storage. Related: Work from home in this minimalist, modular 15-sided cabin A network of talented local artisans and craftspeople including woodworkers, weavers and metalworkers were involved in the building process, so the result is both custom and high-quality. A selection of the materials used in the furnishings was foraged by the owner himself, such as a handmade ladder made from found ash wood . Locally sourced cypress wood makes up the exterior siding, and the entryway is made of reclaimed oak treated with the Japanese wood charring technique of shou sugi ban. There is a modern kitchen, bathroom and a set of sliding glass doors that open to an outdoor back porch. To add a touch of whimsy, an indoor swing is installed in front of one of the massive windows. The Nook is available to rent now through Airbnb . + Shelter Design Studio Images via Mike Belleme

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Check out this handmade wood cabin in North Carolina

Snhetta completes stunning Norwegian cabins for glacier hikers

June 24, 2020 by  
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The breathtaking landscape of Luster in the western part of Norway has recently been joined by Tungestølen, a cluster of timber hiking cabins with cozy interiors and panoramic glacier views. Designed by international design firm Snøhetta for Luster Turlag, a local branch of the Norwegian National Trekking Association, the pentagonal and oblique cabins were built to replace the original Tungestølen Tourist Cabin that had been destroyed by a cyclone in 2011. The new structures are engineered for extreme wind resistance and feature sturdy glulam frames, cross-laminated timber sheeting and ore pine cladding. Perched on a small plateau overlooking the spectacular Jostedalen glacier, Tungestølen is designed to accommodate up to 50 visitors across nine cabins , each of which features a unique, beak-like shape to slow down the strong winds that sweep upward from the valley floor. The sharply pitched roofs give the buildings a playful feel and create dynamic interiors with angular and panoramic windows of varying sizes. Timber lines the light-filled interiors to create a cozy and warm atmosphere.  Related: Elevated, green-roofed cabin minimizes impact on mountain in Norway Because Tungestølen was designed with group hikers in mind, the development is centered on a main cabin that serves as a social hub and meeting spot with its spacious lounge anchored by a large, stone-clad fireplace and panoramic windows that take advantage of the building’s tall ceilings. Built-in benches and furnishings help maximize interior space, which is primarily built of unpainted timber. A restrained color palette that complements the minimalist interiors takes cues from the muted tones of nature and range from charcoal grays to mossy greens. The eight other cabins on site will be used for dormitories and include a single private unit that can accommodate 30 visitors. One of the cabins is based on the original model for the Fuglemyrhytta cabin, another hiking cabin designed by Snøhetta in Oslo that has become a huge hit among hikers since its opening in 2018. Tungestølen was officially inaugurated by Queen Sonja of Norway; the cabins open to the public in June for the hiking season, which spans summer to fall. + Snøhetta Images via Snøhetta

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Snhetta completes stunning Norwegian cabins for glacier hikers

Elevated, green-roofed cabin minimizes impact on mountain in Norway

May 7, 2020 by  
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Designed by San Francisco- and Oslo-based firm Mork-Ulnes Architects , the Skigard Hytte Cabin in Norway features various openings on each side that allow the architects, who designed the cabin for themselves, to immerse themselves in the incredible, mountainous surroundings. The 1,500-square-foot cabin is resilient to the extreme weather and is elevated off the landscape to reduce its impact. To top it all off, the cabin is crowned with a lush green roof . Located close to the peak of the mountain, the beautiful wood cabin holds court west of Kvitfjell, a ski resort about 45 minutes north of Lillehammer. The pristine area is known for its skiing opportunities and is appreciated for its spectacular natural beauty. With a shared love of skiing and exploring the outdoors, architects Casper and Lexie Mork-Ulnes decided to build their dream cabin here. Related: Pinwheel-shaped timber cabin grows more beautiful over time Perched on a steep slope on thin CLT stilts to reduce its impact, the cabin was designed to pay homage to the area by using traditional building materials such as skigard , a cut log that is typically used for fencing by Norwegian farmers. The rough, diagonal facade gives the cabin a unique appearance throughout the year. But in the wintertime, snow falls and gathers within the log gaps, blending the Skigard Hytte Cabin into its surroundings. The cabin’s grass-covered rooftop is also a nod to the vernacular architecture , including the typical log house constructions found throughout Scandinavia in the 19th century. The sod roof moves with the wind, contrasting and complementing the cabin’s otherwise rigid exterior. The interior design is also Scandinavian in both appearance and materials. Throughout the cabin, the minimalist design features solid pine paneling. From nearly every angle, full-height glazing provides ample natural light and, of course, picturesque views. Spanning about 1,500 square feet, the cabin has three bedrooms and a spa, along with a guest annex. The main living area follows an open-plan layout housing the kitchen, dining area and lounge space. At the end of this area is the master bedroom and sauna . Walking through the other side of the home, the residents are greeted by a unique, open-air portal that leads to the guest annex. The annex offers breathtaking views of the mountain range and valleys below. + Mork-Ulnes Architects Via ArchDaily Photography by Bruce Damonte, Juan Benavides and Tor Ivan Boine via Mork-Ulnes Architects

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Elevated, green-roofed cabin minimizes impact on mountain in Norway

Hello Wood unveils a tiny cabin that sleeps up to 8 people

February 19, 2020 by  
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Most cabins are designed to let people enjoy a bit of quiet time, away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. However, for those social butterflies who believe that getting back to nature doesn’t have to mean sacrificing time with friends, Hello Wood has created the beautiful Grand Cabin. Located near Csóromfölde, Hungary, the cabin’s looming A-frame volume was built from panels of prefab wood . Although the pitched-roof shape was inspired by traditional Czech-style mountain lodges, the cabin has an undoubtedly modern aesthetic thanks to the two blue and red capsules that flank the cabin’s jet-black exterior. Related: Solar-powered POP-UP Park takes over underused Budapest square The entrance to the cabin is through a cathedral-like entrance created out of multiple glass panels, which flood the interior with natural light . At first sight, the interior living space looks like any typical cabin of a similar build, but this cozy, 324-square-foot retreat actually sleeps up to eight people comfortably, far more than similar cabins of this size. The minimalist interior is comprised of one open central area, which is arranged to be the social, shared space. However, on either side of this main room, there are a number of room dividers that can be used to create additional sleeping quarters. Additionally, the two colorful boxes seen from the exterior are actually two large bedrooms with built-in bed platforms. According to the Hello Wood team, the Grand Cabin was designed to not only provide a serene space for people looking to reconnect with nature from the comfort of a beautiful tiny cabin but also to provide a way that they can do just that while being surrounded by friends and family. The studio said, “Our concept is about a small cabin that contains a fully equipped community space inside by expanding the A-frame with sleeping capsules — fitting 8+ people. It’s a house for you and all your friends.” + Hello Wood Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Tamás Bujnovszky via Hello Wood

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Hello Wood unveils a tiny cabin that sleeps up to 8 people

Off-grid tiny cabin in Australia is just the place for a digital detox in the new year

January 1, 2020 by  
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Last year, we featured CABN ‘s collection of gorgeous, off-grid cabins that are designed to offer a serene respite away from the stresses of everyday life. Now, the Australian company has just unveiled another beautiful design, the Sadie, which is its first eco-retreat in Victoria. Tucked in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range, the solar-powered cabin is the ideal spot for reconnecting with nature in the new year. Like all of CABN’s projects, the Sadie is designed to go completely off the grid while still offering the ultimate in comfort for guests who are looking to immerse themselves in nature. Located on a remote property in Daylesford, the cabin is less than a 1.5 hour drive from Melbourne. Guests staying at the tiny cabin will enjoy the secluded area, which is surrounded by lush forest and unspoiled nature. Related: These Australian tiny cabins are designed to help us disconnect With a master bedroom and a comfy day bed, the cabin can accommodate up to four guests. In addition to the two sleep spaces, there is a main living area complete with the company’s signature, massive window that frames views of the forested landscape. This window is accompanied by a handful more, all of which brighten the space with natural light during the day. Despite its small size, the cabin has more than enough amenities to make guests feel at home. The bathroom sports a simplistic design of unfinished wood and has enough space for a shower and a composting toilet . For meals, there is a fully equipped kitchen and an outdoor grill. Guests can also enjoy a nice glass of wine while lounging around the firepit, provided its not bushfire season, of course. Although the cabin, which starts at $200 per night, is located in a remote forest seemingly at the end of the earth, in reality, the cabin retreat is in Daylesford, which has plenty of restaurants and shops nearby. Additionally, there are plenty of local wineries in the area to tour. + CABN Images via CABN

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Off-grid tiny cabin in Australia is just the place for a digital detox in the new year

Upcycled materials make up this beautiful cabin retreat in Denmark

December 19, 2019 by  
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Located an hour outside of Copenhagen, this beautiful vacation home is tucked into a lush forest mere steps away from a beach. Designed by Nordhavn-based Lendager Group , the Holiday Cabin consists of five connected structures, all of which are constructed from upcycled waste materials found from demolition sites and local factories. According to the architects, the five connected volumes were built with circular principles in mind out of respect for the pristine nature that surrounds them. As they designed the holiday rental, the designers searched locally to find discarded building materials. They found a great source of waste wood at a local flooring company, and several demolition sites allowed them to salvage old bricks to repurpose for the retreat. Related: These enchanting, off-grid cabins are handcrafted from salvaged materials The cabin exterior, structural frame and exposed rafters are made from the waste wood. To prepare it for its new life in the cabin, the wood was treated in the Japanese traditional preservation of shou sugi ban . Not only does the 700-year-old practice add durability and resilience to the exterior, but dark cladding blends the home into the lush forest that surrounds the property. In addition to the cabin’s reclaimed materials , the living spaces offer guests a gorgeous respite away from the hustle and bustle of city life. Each section of the holiday home offers uninterrupted sea views from the living areas and the outdoor terrace. The entire structure is 1,700 square feet with five bedrooms, three living rooms and three bathrooms. The main living area is arranged in an open plan that it shares with a fully equipped kitchen and dining space. This living area also features several sofas and chairs positioned around a central fireplace. Floor-to-ceiling glazing and skylights allow natural light to filter throughout the interior. + Lendager Group Via ArchDaily Photography by Rasmus Hjortshøj – Coast via Lendager Group

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Upcycled materials make up this beautiful cabin retreat in Denmark

Sigurd Larsen completes a luxurious, treetop hotel cabin in a Danish forest

December 2, 2019 by  
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Danish architect Sigurd Larsen has just unveiled a beautiful, angular treehouse  tucked deep into a picturesque Danish forest. Built for the Løvtag hotel group, the tiny treehouse, which is just 333 square feet, is elevated 26 feet in the air and is accessible by a wooden bridge that leads directly into a stunning, luxurious interior. The treehouse cabin is the first of nine to be built in a quaint, remote forest on the Als Odde peninsula. The idyllic location offers guests the opportunity to explore Denmark’s longest fjord, the Mariager, which is adjacent to the site. Related: Sigurd Larsen adds the ultimate grown up playhouse to Berlin’s Hotel Michelberger Elevated 26 feet off the landscape, the cabins will provide stunning views of the natural surroundings. The studio said, “The cabins are located on a small hilltop overlooking a meadow, which gives a wonderful view over the top of the forest and lets the sunshine in during the afternoon.” The entrance is reachable by a wooden bridge that leads up from the forest floor. Clad in light wood and dark metal sidings, the treehouse hotel was built around an existing pine tree, which rises straight through the cabin’s interior and roof. Designed to be an expression of “ Nordic minimalism ,” the cabins are compact but use every inch of space to create a light-filled, luxurious atmosphere. The interior includes a kitchen, bedroom, bathroom with a cantilevered shower room and main living area. Each treehouse can accommodate up to four people thanks to a double bed and a double sofa bed. The interior features a floor-to-ceiling window to let in natural light and provide unobstructed views of the surroundings from morning to night. For a comfortable space where guests can really take in the views, the cabins have rooftop terraces with plenty of seating. + Sigurd Larsen + Løvtag Cabins Via Dezeen Photography by Soeren-Larsen via Sigurd Larsen

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Sigurd Larsen completes a luxurious, treetop hotel cabin in a Danish forest

Mysterious Black Villa is to be tucked in the lush forests just outside of Moscow

June 12, 2019 by  
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There are few things we love more than dark cabins embedded into lush evergreen forests, and this tiny structure is no exception. The Black Villa in the Forest, designed by Russian architectural firm Archslon, has a certain air of mystery to it that is enhanced by its off-grid location just outside of bustling Moscow. The tiny cabin is a low-lying rectangular volume comprised of two blocks with an inner courtyard separating the two spaces. The entrance is through a small open area, which runs from the front of the house to the back. Related: Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zürich The front of the cabin is an elongated, open-air deck, or what the architects call a “bypass gallery,” that runs the length of one of the main blocks. The space is lined with a series of thin columns, giving a touch of modernity to the structure. The compact square footage and height was a strategic decision made to conserve as many existing trees as possible during construction. Clad in jet-black timber, the home was also designed to blend into its natural surroundings. The main living area is illumined by natural light thanks to a full wall of floor-to-ceiling windows. Along with providing panoramic views of the picturesque scenery, the glazed wall creates a strong, continual connection to the home’s forestscape surroundings. The two blocks separate the home into two living spaces: public and private. On one side of the cabin is the living room and open kitchen. On the other end is the master bedroom that is connected with another small room that can be used as a small office or library. Like the living space, the master bedroom has fully glazed walls, further integrating the surrounding nature into the cabin’s interior. + Archslon Via Archdaily Images via Archslon

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Mysterious Black Villa is to be tucked in the lush forests just outside of Moscow

Solar-powered prefab cabins keep naturally cool in Portugal

June 11, 2019 by  
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When a client approached Lisbon-based architectural practice Studio 3A for a small residential project in the seaside village of Comporta, the architects knew that a major challenge would be keeping the house naturally cool during the oppressively hot summers. In keeping with their commitment to sustainable architecture, the architects used passive solar strategies and efficient insulation to mitigate solar heat gain. The firm also teamed up with design studio Mima Housing to prefabricate the buildings, named Cabanas in Comporta, which were topped with solar panels and sheathed in charred timber for a durable and maintenance-free finish. The architecture of Cabanas in Comporta follows a modular design of three types: the “intimate module” that houses the bedroom and bathroom; the “social module” for the living spaces with room for an outdoor pool; and the “service module” that also serves as storage for items such as the client’s car collection. Together with Mima Housing, Studio 3A prefabricated the modular buildings with oriented strand board sandwich panels and wooden joints. The facades are clad in timber charred black using the Japanese technique of Shou Sugi Ban. Related: The elegant MIMA Light prefab home ‘floats’ on thin air “As local connoisseurs, we based our construction method on the traditional fishermen huts/cabanas as an inspiration for our project,” explain the architects. These huts have been built in this area for years and are very functional and quick to build which were another important point of our brief. With this construction type we had a couple of challenges to face which was the hot-summer Mediterranean climate and the mosquitos which are well known to bug you in the area. We implemented various sustainable strategies to reduce the heat sensation such as the calculated overhangs in front of the main windows, low emissivity window panes and a tensioned solar shading system in between the cabana modules.” Heat gain is further controlled with a double blind system installed in both the interior and exterior. The external blind also zips down to protect the home from mosquito invasions. Strategic placement of the buildings optimizes solar orientation and access to cooling breezes. Dark cement flooring is used to take advantage of thermal mass, while photovoltaic panels and heat pumps help heat the buildings in winter. + Studio 3A Images by Nelson Garrido

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Solar-powered prefab cabins keep naturally cool in Portugal

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