Luxury tree house lets owners hide away in a Cape Town forest

June 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Not all tree houses are rustic backyard projects—some, like the stunning House Paarman in Cape Town, take the typology to luxurious new heights. Designed by South African studio Malan Vorster , this one-bedroom getaway is a modern interpretation of the forest and blends in with its surroundings. The compact cabin is elevated off the ground and immerses guests into the tree canopy with views overlooking the forest and a quartet of square reflection pools. The freestanding House Paarman is an abstraction of the forest and comprises four cylindrical units that symbolize trees, each with a tree trunk-like steel pillar with branch-like beams and circular rings that provide support to the floors above. The four cylindrical units are arranged in a pinwheel layout around a square base. The columns, arms and rings are constructed from laser-cut and folded Corten steel plate. Western red cedar wraps the building and is left untreated so as to develop a patina over time. The architects write: “Inspiration was drawn from the timber cabins of Horace Gifford and Kengo Kuma’s notions of working with the void or in-between space, while Louis Kahn’s mastery of pure form and the detailing ethic of Carlo Scarpa informed a process of geometric restraint and handcrafted manufacturing.” Related: Dreamy treehouse hidden in Woodstock offers magnificent Catskills views This masterful attention to detail can be seen everywhere in the compact cabin , which was designed with ample glazing to give it a sense of lightness. Connections between the mostly vertical steel elements and the horizontal timber elements are joined with hand-turned brass components. Furnishings, such as the bed and cabinetry, were custom-made from solid oak. In addition to floor-height glazing, natural materials and a subdued color palette reinforce connection with nature. The House Paarman features a living space on the first floor, a bedroom on the second, and roof deck on the third. A sculptural staircase connects the floors. A plant room is tucked below the building on the ground floor. The half-round bays created by the cylindrical shapes include a patio, dining alcove, bathroom, and built-in seat. + Malan Vorster Images by Adam Letch and Mickey Hoyle

Go here to read the rest:
Luxury tree house lets owners hide away in a Cape Town forest

Dreamy treehouse hidden by Woodstock offers magnificent Catskills views

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

A perfect getaway surrounded by nature is hidden away near the town of Woodstock. UK-based Antony Gibbon Designs crafted this blissful retreat, called Inhabit Treehouse, that’s nestled within dense forest less than a two-hour drive from New York City. Built from locally and sustainably sourced reclaimed timber , Inhabit treehouse offers beautiful and cozy digs with stunning views of a lake and the Catskills mountain range beyond. Built for a family with plans of opening the treehouse up to rentals, Inhabit Treehouse is a small and efficiently designed space with all the comforts of home. FSC-certified reclaimed cedar sourced from the Catskills valley clads the treehouse , while FSC-certified reclaimed pine lines the interior. The timber facade will develop an attractive patina over time to help the building blend into the landscape. Large windows open the treehouse up to natural light and views of the outdoors. Guests can also reconnect with nature from the two balconies on either side of the building. The treehouse interior comprises an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room with a wood-burning stove ; a spacious loft bedroom; shower and bathroom; and a second bedroom in the rear that could easily be transformed into an office. A large terrace beneath the treehouse leads down to the lake and a hot tub. Related: Incredible teepee-shaped ORKA house is made from 24 interlacing beams “Inhabit Treehouse contrasts geometric forms against the organic forms of the forest but still blends into the surroundings with its timber materials,” Antony Gibbons told Inhabitat. “New trees were also planted close to the structure to help strengthen the idea that the building cuts through the forest and is semi-camouflaged into its surroundings. The sharp geometric angles of the Interior also created an interesting layout that pushed away from 90 degree corners as much as possible.” + Antony Gibbons Design Images via Antony Gibbons Design

Read the rest here:
Dreamy treehouse hidden by Woodstock offers magnificent Catskills views

These minimalist prefab cabins are designed for human "recharging"

May 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on These minimalist prefab cabins are designed for human "recharging"

Innovative charging stations for cars or electronics are a dime a dozen these days, but finally, one savvy Danish company has created a place where people can go to recharge their own batteries. Known for their simplistic metal and ceramic homeware line, Danish retailer Vipp is now venturing into the minimalistic dwellings sector with Shelter, a prefabricated monochromatic cabin designed to serve as an escape from urban chaos. The 600-square-foot cabins, which retail for approximately $543,00, were designed to be nature retreats and serve as a “battery-charging station for humans”, said Kasper Egelund, head of VIPP. Much like the company’s simple, but sturdy housewares, the cabin design is elegant and minimalistic. The monochromatic metal and glass cabin easily blends into any natural setting. The rectangular structure is set on piers to reduce its impact on its location. Related: MUJI to sell eagerly awaited $27k minimalist tiny homes this fall On the interior, a simple open layout gives the space a quiet, serene feel. The main level houses a kitchen, a dining area, a bathroom and a small bedroom with a fireplace. A sleeping loft with a glass ceiling is reached by ladder. Floor-to-ceiling glass panels cover one full side of the structure, which not only connects the interior to the exterior, but provides optimal natural light to the living space. The steel-framed Shelter cabins are prefabricated just north of Copenhagen and take just six months to construct and only three to five days to install. The cabins even come furnished with Vipp products such as shelving, lighting, lines, soap dispensers, etc. + Vipp Via Dezeen Images via Vipp

See the rest here:
These minimalist prefab cabins are designed for human "recharging"

Heatherwick Studio updates 90-year-old grain silo in South Africa with pillowed glass windows

May 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Heatherwick Studio updates 90-year-old grain silo in South Africa with pillowed glass windows

Prolific architecture firm  Heatherwick Studio has updated an abandoned silo in Cape Town with beautiful pillowed glass windows. The former silo building has sat at the heart of the Table Bay harbor since 1924 and, out of respect for the beloved landmark, the architects worked to retain much of the building’s original character during the renovation process. The team managed to retain 42 cylindrical storage silos that form the concrete skeleton, which houses the recently-opened luxury Royal Portfolio hotel, designed by Liz Biden. The old silo , which was used as an international grain trade and export facility, held court for some 80 years at the heart of Table Bay harbor, but was eventually closed down. As part of the city’s urban redesign plan , the silo was slated to be converted into a useful community-centered space, featuring a hotel and museum. The first part of the project, the hotel, which was designed by The Royal Portfolio , has recently been opened and features six floors of the luxury built in the space that once housed the old grain elevators. Related: Heatherwick Studio wants to build a tree-covered mountain in the middle of Shanghai Although the silo’s interior has been converted into a modern space, the building still retains some of its original aesthetic, namely the concrete exterior frame. Contrasting nicely with the concrete, large bulbous windows were installed and provide incredible views of the harbor as well as the Table Mountain in the background,  a view which is spectacular from the large open-air rooftop. Additionally, the glass facade will serve as a glowing beacon when illuminated at night. On the interior, the eclectic design pays homage to the area’s long history while blending in whimsical touches to the atmosphere. According to the designer, Liz Biden, the inspiration for the design was focused on balancing the old with the new, “My goal has always been to pay tribute to luxury and [provide] comfort for our guests,” said Biden. “This has meant balancing the stark and industrial style of the architecture with aspects of classic glamour and modern comfort.” Funky industrial features can be found throughout the hotel, such as chandeliers made out of original steel rings used inside the grain elevator. In addition to its design, the hotel will constantly feature plenty of local artists on its walls and even has its own private art gallery, The Vault, which will exhibit works by emerging African artists . Although the hotel conversion has just been completed, there is still more to be done on the overall silo conversion. Now, the focus is on the creation of the space underneath the hotel, which will house the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (MOCAA), also designed by Heatherwick Studio and slated to open in September of 2017. + Heatherwick Studio Via Dezeen

Read more from the original source:
Heatherwick Studio updates 90-year-old grain silo in South Africa with pillowed glass windows

Passive solar home built of recycled natural materials "floats in the Australian bush

May 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Passive solar home built of recycled natural materials "floats in the Australian bush

At first glance, the delightfully sinuous roof that tops the Lauriston house makes the building look more like sculpture than a home in the Australian bush. But a closer look reveals that the building truly is a welcoming retreat meticulously detailed with the luxurious comforts of home and more. Designed by Seeley Architects , the Lauriston house is a beautiful dwelling that embraces the outdoors as well as passive solar principles for an environmentally friendly footprint. Designed for a client who sought intimacy with the outdoors, the 380-square-meter Lauriston house’s rectangular volume is predominately covered in floor-to-ceiling glazing to overlook the landscape of olive groves and gum trees. To protect the glass home from the elements, the architects carefully sited the building and topped it with an undulating roof that protects against rain and sun. The roof’s wavy shape also references the hilly landscape near Kyneton, Victoria. “The geometrically aligned rows of olive trees set against a voluptuous landscape evoke a quiet, unspoken tension,” wrote the architects, referencing the contrast between the indigenous flora and the structured olive groves. “The house mimics this tension with the relationship of a meticulously detailed and structured frame against a seemingly effortless floating, sinuous roof.” The building’s glazed form is given a heightened sense of lightness with its bold cantilever . Related: Solar-powered Bush House exemplifies chic eco-friendly living in the Australian outback Local natural materials and textures give the home a sense of warmth, from the Messmate timber lining to the colonial-inspired French pattern bluestone. The interior is organized around a centrally located alfresco entrance that separates the private areas on the east end from the public spaces to the west. The open-plan living and dining area opens up to the cantilevered deck with stunning landscape views of hills, dams, and olive groves. The home’s integration of passive solar principles and rainwater capture systems ensures a lower energy footprint. + Seeley Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Peter Hyatt

View post:
Passive solar home built of recycled natural materials "floats in the Australian bush

Prefabricated lakeside cabin is a beautiful exercise in restraint

May 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Prefabricated lakeside cabin is a beautiful exercise in restraint

Family reunions can be loud affairs, a fact that one Torontonian family patriarch with ten energetic grandkids knows well. To secure peace and quiet while staying close to visiting family, a homeowner on Ontario’s Lake Simcoe hired Superkül architects to design a retreat within a retreat—a modern kid-free cabin separate from his existing bungalow. Dubbed Pointe Cabin, the prefabricated modern dwelling is a beautiful exercise in restraint that fully embraces the outdoors. The two-bedroom, 840-square-foot Pointe Cabin is sited close to the client’s original log cottage, purchased in the 1970s, at the edge of Cook’s Bay on the southern tip of Lake Simcoe. Although the new addition contrasts with its predecessor in its contemporary design, both cabins are linked by their predominant use of timber that blends the buildings into the wooded surroundings. Natural, locally sourced , and low maintenance materials were used in the indoor and outdoor living areas and include a mixture of cedar, white oak, and spruce-pine-fir. Related: Superkül Designs Canada’s First Active House To meet cost and efficiency targets, the single-story cabin was prefabricated offsite. The factory-built wall, floor, and roof panels were trucked to the site and the home was assembled in just a few days. The two-bedroom home is connected to the original cabin with a glazed passageway and contains a private entry, kitchenette, bathroom, and wrap-around deck. Floor-to-ceiling glass frames views of the lake and the landscape. + Superkül architects Images via Superkül architects , by Shai Gil

See the rest here: 
Prefabricated lakeside cabin is a beautiful exercise in restraint

Architect Jim Olson spent 55 years renovating this breathtaking Puget Sound cabin

April 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Architect Jim Olson spent 55 years renovating this breathtaking Puget Sound cabin

It would be safe to say that architect Jim Olson from Olson Kundig Architects is an incredibly patient man. In a world where architects strive to build skyscapers at record-breaking speed , the award-winning architect took his time with the construction of his own lake house, as in 55 years. Olson began to build the cabin, located in Longbranch, Washington, in 1959. What began as a mere 14-square-foot bunk house has been patiently and lovingly transformed over the years into a breathtaking lake-side cabin . Starting the cabin construction when he was just 18-years-old, Olson has worked on the structure for decades, always adding new features to the design. However, the word “renovation” doesn’t adequately describe the cabin’s decades-long transformation; rather it was a creative layering process that always incorporated the cabin’s past features into its more modern present. Related: Enproyecto Arquitectura’s Spanish Coastal Stone Cabin Holds More Than a Few Surprises Details hidden among the modest cabin mark each remodeling stage, architecturally revealing the cabin’s design history. Distinct textures and color schemes make up the impressive living space which lies under the exposed glulam beams. Steel columns mark the living space divisions and impressive floor-to-ceiling windows allow for incredible full-frame views of the Puget Sound. In addition to the architect’s sophisticated design features, there are various signs of Olson’s love of nature within the home. Fir flooring extends throughout the living room onto the exterior deck, seamlessly connecting the interior with the exterior. The outdoor deck was also built around three large trees that grew up during the long construction period. Olson wanted to make sure that they were able to continue to grow uninterrupted no matter what new construction may come to the house. + Olson Kundig Architects Via Gessato Images via Olson Kundig Architects  

See the rest here:
Architect Jim Olson spent 55 years renovating this breathtaking Puget Sound cabin

Renovated California cabin with star-studded history goes up for sale

February 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Renovated California cabin with star-studded history goes up for sale

This renovated lodge-inspired house preserves the star-studded legacy of the original structure. First built for the 1923 silent movie “The Courtship of Miles Standish”, the home was formerly owned by Daryl Hannah. The existing owners commissioned architect Chris Peck , interior designer Lisa Strong , builder Eric Dobkin and landscape architect Samantha Gore to dream up a beautiful 6,195-square-foot estate expansion and renovation. The house, currently listed for sale , is tucked amidst the trees of the iconic Uplifters Ranch neighborhood of Rustic Canyon, and offers privacy to its occupants. In 2012, current owners Marla and Larry Butler commissioned a team of designers to renovate the cabin  into a larger building that would preserve as much of the original materials as possible. Stones from the original cabin were reused, while naturally fallen lodge pole pine timber from Montana dominates most of the exterior and interior. Related: 6 Tiny Homes under $50,000 you can buy right now An open-plan kitchen and dining room feature double-case windows and bi-fold doors that offer spectacular views of the surrounding nature. A large terrace with a plunge pool and stone walkways functions as an outdoor entertaining area. Original furniture, fixtures and windows strengthen the connection to the past. + Chris Peck + Samantha Gore + Lisa Strong Design

Read the original post:
Renovated California cabin with star-studded history goes up for sale

Fairytale-inspired lakeside cabin is made from locally felled and milled timber

December 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Fairytale-inspired lakeside cabin is made from locally felled and milled timber

London-based architecture practice De Rosee Sa replaced an old dilapidated structure with a “magical” 35-square-meter black cabin that takes inspiration from fairytales. Located by a lakeside in Nouvelles, Belgium, the tiny Woodland Cabin is a self-build project commissioned by architect Max de Rosee’s father who wanted a simple and economical getaway built within a £25,000 budget. Elegant yet affordable, this charming black hut minimized costs with the use of recycled materials as well as locally felled and milled timber. Topped with a steeply pitched roof, the Woodland Cabin was built with the local rural vernacular in mind. The timber-framed structure sits on concrete strip foundations with brick dwarf walls that support a suspended timber floor. The external wood cladding is stained black with a mixture of wood stain and recycled tractor engine oil given to the architects for free by local farmers. All of the timber beams and cladding were felled and milled from trees in the surrounding woods by De Rosee’s father. Related: Modern timber frame oyster shack grows a garden on its roof The simple interior features a large central open space with a wood-burning stove , as well as a small bathroom. “To capture the surrounding natural beauty, its openings respond to the outside views and approaches to the cabin,” write the architects. “The internal space has been designed for various uses including working, sleeping and socialising, and is heated by a wood burning stove.” The walls and floors are built from oriented strand board, and the timber roof beams are exposed for sculptural effect. Large doors open the room up to a wraparound timber deck . + De Rosee Sa Via ArchDaily Images via De Rosee Sa , by Will Scott

Originally posted here:
Fairytale-inspired lakeside cabin is made from locally felled and milled timber

Off-grid solar could power all of Myanmar by 2030

December 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Off-grid solar could power all of Myanmar by 2030

Only 16 percent of rural houses in Myanmar have access to electricity , but that’s about to change. A government-led project aided by private companies could power up the entire country using off-grid solar energy . The electricity could irrigate rice farms, provide lighting in homes, and save lives. Off-grid solar could energize communities all across Myanmar. As traditional alternative power sources like diesel generators are far too expensive for many people who live in poverty in the country, government-funded off-grid solar could offer cost-effective, clean electricity for more people. Related: Off-grid healthcare housing is powered entirely by solar in Burundi Non-profit organizations are financing Myanmar solar projects too. With charity funds via Mitsui & Co. , electronics company Panasonic recently installed a Power Supply Container in the settlement of Yin Ma Chaung. The off-grid station generates 2.82 kilowatts of energy for the settlement and nearby villages. This power is critical for Yin Ma Chaung, an area populated with deadly snakes. Lifesaving antivenom must be refrigerated, but many people were losing their lives before obtaining solar power since the community previously only had coolers that frequently broke down. A portion of the newly installed solar power systems will provide energy for a community center refrigerator filled with the antivenom, allowing locals to breathe easier as they go about their daily lives. That’s just one project among thousands, according to The Guardian. Renewable energy company Sunlabob set up 11 solar mini-grids that will provide power for nearly 1,000 homes. Another renewable energy company, Myanmar Eco Solutions , installed a solar-fueled irrigation system for rice farmers in remote Myanmar. Out of 188 countries on the United Nation’s benchmark development index, Myanmar is 148. Although citizens there still wrestle with poverty, clean, renewable electricity could provide the boost the country needs to develop. Via The Guardian Images via Sunlabob Facebook and Panasonic

See original here:
Off-grid solar could power all of Myanmar by 2030

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1373 access attempts in the last 7 days.