Sweden is putting stressed-out people in tiny glass ‘chillout cabins’

September 12, 2017 by  
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Can nature really be the cure for stress? Sweden wants to find out – so it’s sending five people in extremely stressful professions to spend three glorious days in beautiful glass-enclosed “ chillout cabins ” on an idyllic island. The 72 Hour Cabin program seeks to investigate the effects of nature on people’s well-being. Led by researchers Walter Osika and Cecilia Stenfors from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, the case study explores how Allemansrätten (freedom to roam) affects people’s mental and physical health. The aim of the study is to spread awareness of the unique relationship the Swedish population has with nature , and encourage people around the world to spend more time bonding with Mother Nature. Related: Artist builds incredible stained-glass cabin in the middle of the woods “Year after year, Sweden takes first place in international rankings of countries with the best life quality. Swedish nature, which is clean, vast and easy to take part in, is a part of the secret.” the 72-hour website reads. “The Swedes’ unique relationship with nature is an important part of their well-being, which is why Sweden has created ‘The 72 Hour Cabin’. With the initiative, Sweden wants to acquaint visitors with the special bond that Swedes have with their natural environment, and invite the world to experience it themselves.” The lucky participants include a London broadcaster, a Parisian taxi driver, an event planner from New York, a German police officer, and a British travel journalist. Each will spend three days in their own cabin located on Henriksholm island in West Sweden, experiencing the Swedish “close to nature” lifestyle. All communication with the outside world will be forbidden. For the most part, the participants will be able to hike, fish, cook, swim, and generally enjoy their peaceful surroundings. Researchers will be on-site to measure their well-being based on stress levels, problem-solving ability, and creativity. The results of the study will be presented in October. The glass cabins were designed by Jeanna Berger and built with the help of Fridh & Hells Bygg AB Construction Company . Berger grew up on the island and used the beautiful area as inspiration for the design. The wood-framed structures – which are placed on pillars in order to leave a light footprint – were inspired by the traditional barns found in the area. + 72 Hour Cabin Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Maja Flink  

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Sweden is putting stressed-out people in tiny glass ‘chillout cabins’

Lakeside cabin made out of reclaimed wood is as idyllic as it gets

August 29, 2017 by  
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Seattle-based architects, Hoedemaker Pfeiffer  just unveiled a contemporary cabin-style home built on the banks of beautiful Lake Chelan. The architects used planks of reclaimed wood to build the stunning home, which sits overlooking incredibly scenic views. Think they have a guest room for us? The lake house design is a contemporary take on the traditional wooden cabin , with plenty of carefully cultivated rustic charm included throughout. The 3,300- square-foot structure – which is clad in reclaimed lumber and roofed with corrugated galvanized steel – sits on a heavily-wooded lot with front slope of natural stone. The interior is a bright and airy space with wooden flooring and exposed Doug Fir beams in the kitchen and living room. Related: Architect Jim Olson spent 55 years renovating this breathtaking Puget Sound cabin However, it’s clearly the lake view that inspired the beautiful home’s design. Large windows in virtually every room flood the interior with natural light as well as offer breathtaking views of the picturesque surroundings. The heart of the home is the open-air terrace that sits adjacent to the lake’s edge. Covered with a chunky wooden pergola , the outdoor area is complete with a glass-enclosed fire pit and plenty of comfy seating. + Hoedemaker Pfeiffer Photography by Thomas J. Story  

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Lakeside cabin made out of reclaimed wood is as idyllic as it gets

Norway’s Fleinvaer cabins offer the ultimate in off-grid living on a remote island

June 13, 2017 by  
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These isolated cabins built on a remote island in Norway take off-grid living to new heights. Located on the country’s Arctic archipelago and only reachable by ferry, the Fleinvaer Cabins offer the ultimate in solitude. The retreat consists of four cabins designed for sleeping, plus bonus accommodations in a nearby cave. The island’s cluster of cabins are supported by four dedicated structures that house a kitchen, studio, sauna, and a bath. The rest of the cabins are built for sleeping. For those looking to go a step further into nature, there’s also a cave near the sauna’s pier that can be slept in. Technically, the cabins offer enough space for 12 people, but according to the Fleinvaer website, the experience is really designed for those looking for true solitude, “Here are no shops, and no cars. Here is no stress, and no dangerous animals.” Related: Rugged eco-friendly cabins offer off-grid lodging in Norway’s wilderness To get to the island of Fleinvaer, guests must take a ferry from downtown Bodø. Basic necessities like food are organized with the hosts before arrival because there are absolutely no shops on the island . Additionally, guests are encouraged to pack few items – just some wool clothing and a pair of shorts. The cabins are also a welcome retreat for creatives . Every year, the island hosts six, week-long “Artist in Residences” programs in collaboration with the Nordland county council’s culture department. + Fordypningsrommet Fleinvaer Cabins Via Uncrate Photography by Kathrine Sørgård & Fredrik Asplin via Fordypningsrommet

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Norway’s Fleinvaer cabins offer the ultimate in off-grid living on a remote island

This T-shirt changes colors in response to water pollution

June 13, 2017 by  
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Ocean acidification isn’t something that most folks lose sleep over. As a side effect of climate change , it doesn’t present a striking image the way a crack in the Antarctic ice shelf or a hurricane-battered coast might. But some problems need to be seen to be believed, so David de Rothschild, founder of the lifestyle brand The Lost Explorer , and Lauren Bowker, the alchemist-cum-designer behind The Unseen , took it upon themselves to draw out the visually indiscernible. They did this by creating a special kind of T-shirt, one that changes colors in response to a water’s pH. No toxic chemicals were used to create the effect. The secret, as it turns out, was cabbage—lots of cabbage. De Rothschild and Bowker dyed their cotton-and-hemp tee using red cabbage, a leafy green that is rich in a class of water-soluble pigments known as anthocyanins . Anthocyanins respond to changes in pH by cycling through a spectrum of hues, which range from red-pink to blue-green. Related: Color-changing syringes can save the lives of millions “Red cabbage juice contains anthocyanin and can be used as a pH indicator,” Bowker explained . “It’s red, pink, or magenta in acids, purple in neutral solutions, and ranges from blue to green to yellow in alkaline solutions.” Changes in the pH of water can happen for a raft of reasons. The more carbon dioxide we spew, the more carbon dioxide the oceans absorb. And since some of the carbon reacts within the water to create carbonic acid, the more acidic they become. Sulfur-dioxide and nitrogen-oxide emissions from factories, automobiles, and electric power plants contribute to acid rain, while certain detergents can cause wastewater to become overly alkaline. “So the T-shirts, by changing color, are a really good way of figuring out the state of the local water,” Bowker added. Related: Beautiful Collision tableware uses red cabbage dye to create unexpected pigments The duo didn’t design the shirt to shame people. Neither are they under the delusion that a color-changing garment will save the world. “I like creating experiences that disarm people because if it’s insane, magical and unexpected enough, they might feel safer about asking questions. It’s this convergence of art and activism and creativity and design. It hopefully isn’t telling people what to do,” de Rothschild said. “T-shirts have always been a billboard to say something. In a funny way, the T-shirt doesn’t need to say anything in this instance. Products won’t change the world, people will! What you do as an individual that matters.” + The Lost Explorer + The Unseen Via Dezeen

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This T-shirt changes colors in response to water pollution

Sublime reading cabin in upstate New York built with timber felled on site

September 6, 2016 by  
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According to the architects, the timber cabin’s construction came about after building a main home nearby. The remaining felled oak trees left over from the larger construction area were cut into large rectangular logs and left to dry on site for several years. Related: The Rock Bottom is a tiny off-grid reading cabin built for just $300 in Vermont “The strategy for the cottage centered on preserving and transforming a material that would otherwise have become construction waste,” said principal Brandon Padron. As for the building strategy, the log cabin and its interior shelving was an all-in-one process. As they horizontally piled the logs on top of one another, spatial gaps emerged, which were used to create floor-to-ceiling bookshelves. The process also included leaving larger gaps for the windows, strategically placed to let in natural reading light, of course. Albeit compact, the one-room space has just enough space for a bed, comfy armchair, and a small desk. A wood-burning stove heats the tiny room so visitors can enjoy some literary downtime all year round. + Studio Padron Via Dezeen

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Sublime reading cabin in upstate New York built with timber felled on site

Tranquil timber cabins and a bamboo grove surround a hot spring hotel near Beijing

December 23, 2015 by  
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Build Your Own Flat-Pack Micro Nomad Home for Less than $30,000

February 3, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Build Your Own Flat-Pack Micro Nomad Home for Less than $30,000 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , “sustainable architecture” , $30000 flat-pack home , affordable housing , cabin design , flat pack house , flat-pack housing for nomads , green design , green home , nomad , nomad micro home , off-grid micro housing , renewable energy , solar-powered flat-pack micro home , solar-powered micro home        

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Build Your Own Flat-Pack Micro Nomad Home for Less than $30,000

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