Newly renovated Seventh Generation HQ focuses on sustainability

June 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Seventh Generation, the company famous for its eco-friendly and bio-based home and personal care products, recently unveiled its renovated headquarters in Burlington, Vermont. Finished in January 2020, the $3.5 million project focused on aligning employee experience with the company’s social mission and values by transitioning the global headquarters into a fully agile workplace. An agile work environment traditionally utilizes strategies meant to optimize the use of space and promote creativity through features such as comfortable seating areas, quiet reflective spaces, outdoor workspaces and standing desks. Green-minded businesses often promote agile work spaces in order to reduce environmental footprints. Related: The Nature Conservancy’s Oregon HQ gets a green renovation Seventh Generation took this opportunity to add free address workstations, shared community tables and individual storage lockers for its employees. There are now enclosed huddle rooms, phone booths and open scrum areas on each floor to promote flexibility and collaboration among departments, and the central atrium has been renovated to open up to adjacent workspaces on each floor. To inspire healthier eating habits, there is an onsite garden to provide vegetables for the company cafeterias. Each floor is assigned its own unique color that connects it to one of the company’s core values: nurture nature, enhance health, transform commerce and build communities. The project is currently pending for LEED Gold Certification for Commercial Interiors due to its focus on sustainability. Over 90% of the construction waste from the renovation has been either recycled or diverted from landfill. The building uses 45% less than the baseline annual water use of a similarly-coded office space, and it boasts energy-efficient LED lighting and a green cleaning products policy to spare the office from harmful contaminants. Biophilic elements (designs choices meant to connect building occupants to nature) can be found throughout the office as well. Quality ventilation, custom planters and open workspaces integrated with greenery improve interior air quality and reflect the core ethics of the environment-focused company. Seventh Generation also tests indoor air quality regularly to ensure that employees aren’t being exposed to chemical, biological or particulate contaminants. The project was led by architect and interior design firm, TruexCullins. + TruexCullins Images via TruexCullins

More: 
Newly renovated Seventh Generation HQ focuses on sustainability

LEED Platinum Stockman Bank harvests rainwater and solar power in Missoula

June 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on LEED Platinum Stockman Bank harvests rainwater and solar power in Missoula

In Montana’s historic downtown Missoula, a Stockman Bank branch has recently earned LEED v4 Core and Shell Platinum certification — the second building in the U.S and the fifth worldwide to receive such accreditation. Designed by Billings-based architecture firm Cushing Terrell , Stockman Bank’s Missoula location boasts energy-efficient and energy-saving systems throughout, from high-performance glass and solar arrays to an innovative on-site rainwater system that provides 100% of average annual water use for toilet and urinal flushing. The six-story bank uses 75% less energy and 69% less water than a comparable office building. Certified LEED v4 Platinum in September 2019, Stockman Bank’s downtown Missoula branch spans 67,753 square feet across six floors, two of which are used as parking with space for 137 vehicles, covered bicycle parking and electric vehicle charging systems. The top three building levels include outdoor terraces, while the sixth-floor rooftop level features a lush garden space that can be used for meetings, entertaining and community activities. The roof level overlooks panoramic views of Missoula and the surrounding valleys and is also topped with a 48.75 KW photovoltaic array with 150 solar panels that provide 11% of the building’s energy. Related: Solar-powered Lowell Justice Center will be Massachusetts’ first LEED Platinum courthouse Despite the building’s inclusion of high-tech, energy-saving technology, the bank’s appearance is firmly rooted in the local vernacular respectful of its historic district location. The masonry exterior uses brick and quarried granite from South Dakota as well as cast stone detailing and a high-performance glass curtain wall that floods the interior with natural light. Approximately 70% of recycled material was used in the steel frame construction.  In addition to rainwater harvesting and solar panels , the bank includes an open-loop ground source heat pump system and chilled beams as well as energy-efficient elevators with regenerative braking to recoup electricity in descent. + Cushing Terrell Photography by Heidi Long via Cushing Terrell

View original here: 
LEED Platinum Stockman Bank harvests rainwater and solar power in Missoula

Scientists support use of reusable containers during COVID-19 pandemic

June 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Scientists support use of reusable containers during COVID-19 pandemic

Since the start of the pandemic, there have been concerns that using reusable containers and bags at grocery stores and cafes could enhance the spread of the virus. However, such claims have now been refuted by a team of 119 scientists. The team, which includes scientists from 18 countries, has published a document stating that reusable containers are safe. Many cafes, restaurants and grocery stores around the world have stopped accepting reusable cups, bags and other containers for fear that these items would spread COVID-19. Environmentalists have pushed for a long time to have restaurants and other businesses adopt the use of reusable containers. But these gains made over the years risk being eroded almost overnight if people continue to revert to single-use containers. Environmentalists are now accusing plastic manufactures of exploiting the coronavirus pandemic to lobby for single-use plastics. Related: COVID-19 leads to plastic ban reversals The scientists involved in reassuring the public include epidemiologists, virologists, biologists and doctors. They have compiled a statement that encourages restaurants and individuals to continue using reusable containers as long as public health requirements are observed. The team said that reusable items are safe as long as high standards of hygiene are observed. One of the signatories to the statement, professor Charlotte Williams of Oxford University, explained that COVID-19 should not stop the efforts made toward a sustainable future. “I hope we can come out of the COVID-19 crisis more determined than ever to solve the pernicious problems associated with plastics in the environment,” Williams said. According to the scientists’ statement, the coronavirus primarily spreads through aerosol droplets and not from contact with surfaces. Although surfaces can transfer the virus, washing reusable containers is much safer than relying on single-use ones. The scientists explained that most people do not bother cleaning single-use containers under the assumption that they are safe. Unfortunately, the virus can get in contact with any surface, including single-use containers. Europe plans to ban all single-use plastics starting next year. There is concern that plastic manufacturers are now using the coronavirus pandemic to delay the ban. Such a move would be detrimental, considering that plastic waste contributes 80% of all marine pollution . + Health Expert Statement Via The Guardian Image via Goran Ivos

Here is the original: 
Scientists support use of reusable containers during COVID-19 pandemic

NBBJ to design Tencents futuristic Net City in Shenzhen

June 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on NBBJ to design Tencents futuristic Net City in Shenzhen

Global design firm NBBJ has won an international competition to design Net City, a 2-million-square-meter masterplanned Shenzhen district for Tencent, China’s largest internet company. Envisioned as a “city of the future,” Net City will prioritize “human-centric” and sustainable design through the inclusion of an extensive public transit network, a green corridor and energy-generating systems. The abundance of greenery will also help the project meet the goals of China’s Sponge City Initiative so that stormwater runoff is collected and managed throughout the campus. Developed for the 320-acre peninsula along Shenzhen’s Dachanwan, Net City was created to meet Tencent’s growing office needs in the upcoming years. The mixed-use masterplan covers roughly the same size and shape of Midtown Manhattan and will be centered on a new Tencent building that is surrounded by a living quarter with schools and an assortment of retail spaces and other amenities. The buildings will range in height from single-story structures to three-story towers as part of an overarching design vision for differentiated spaces with strong sight lines to nature. Related: MVRDV designs a sustainable “urban living room” for Shenzhen “A typical city calls for simplistic and efficient zoning to keep everything under strict control and facilitate the flow of goods, cars and people,” said Jonathan Ward, design partner at NBBJ. “This principle was driven by a love for the industrial age machine. In today’s computer-driven world, we are free to imagine a highly integrated city that brings ‘work, live, play’ closer together to foster more synergy between people. This fits in perfectly with the collegial, collaborative culture of Tencent.” A public transit network with a subway, bus and shuttle system as well as a folding green corridor for pedestrians, bicycles and autonomous vehicles will shape a pedestrian-friendly environment. General vehicles will be diverted underground. In addition to an abundance of green space ranging from recreational parks to wetlands, Net City will also include rooftop solar panels, green roofs and environmental performance trackers to reduce the district’s overall environmental footprint. + NBBJ Images via NBBJ

See the rest here:
NBBJ to design Tencents futuristic Net City in Shenzhen

A puzzle-inspired sliding facade improves this buildings energy efficiency

June 12, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A puzzle-inspired sliding facade improves this buildings energy efficiency

In the Ballard neighborhood, close to Seattle’s downtown, local architecture firm Graham Baba Architects has completed the Klotski, a mixed-use infill building that emphasizes energy efficiency . Named after the sliding block puzzle that inspired its southern facade, the building uses a mix of high- and low-tech strategies to minimize energy use, including rooftop solar panels, radiant heating, operable windows and sliding metal sunshades. The Klotski is also equipped with rainwater cisterns that collect and recycle rainwater. Graham Baba Architects designed the Klotski to reflect the eclectic and industrial roots of the Ballard neighborhood. Built from concrete masonry units and a steel frame, the 10,041-square-foot building features an open floor-plan, exposed structural beams and tall ceilings for a loft-like, industrial feel. The three-story, mixed-use building houses the Trailbend Taproom beer hall on the ground floor, office space on the second floor, a maker space on a self-contained mezzanine level and a studio as well as a small caretaker’s apartment on the top floor. On-site covered parking is accessed off the alley. Related: Gensler upcycles an old warehouse into creative offices in Austin Designed to engage the street level, the building is set back from the property line by several feet to create space for outdoor dining while extensive glazing promotes transparency and connection to the community. Generous roof decks — such as the outdoor deck for the studio and apartment on the top floor — and an interior courtyard promote an indoor/ outdoor living experience throughout. Optimized for natural ventilation and daylight, the building features operable windows on the north and south sides. The Klotski-inspired sunshades on the south-facing exterior consist of 7-foot-by-10-foot perforated metal screens that slide up and down to respond to privacy and shading needs that change throughout the seasons. + Graham Baba Architects Photography by Kevin Scott via Graham Baba Architects

Originally posted here:
A puzzle-inspired sliding facade improves this buildings energy efficiency

Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

June 12, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

The first 3D-printed house in Czech Republic is scheduled for completion by the end of June 2020. Not only will the project, called Prvok, only take about 48 hours to build, but this floating home will also set an example for innovative affordable housing solutions for the future. The project will be printed with partially self-sustaining green technology , including a re-circulation shower, a green roof and well reservoirs for water. It is a collaboration between sculptor Michal Trpak and building society Stavebni sporitelna Ceske sporitelny. Related: This clothing tech company is 3D-printing garments to help reduce waste Once completed, the home will have been built seven times faster than conventional houses, saving up to 50% of construction costs compared to a regular building, all while reducing construction waste and carbon emissions by about 20% along the way. It is printed using a highly advanced robotic arm that moves 15 centimeters per second. To create the structure, a specially developed concrete mixture enriched with nano-polypropylene fibers, plasticizers and a setting accelerator will flow through a tip in the robotic arm. While Prvok will have the ability to float via pontoon anchor, the house will also be designed to stand on land, suitable for long-term living in both the country and the city. The nearly 463-square-foot living space will feature three rooms in total: a bedroom, a bathroom and a combination living room/kitchen. The design renderings feature a substantial green roof as well as massive porthole windows, an exposed concrete exterior and wood plank flooring for a unique, nautical appearance. According to Trpak, future owners of the 3D-printed home will be able to crush the building once it has reached the end of its life and reprint it again using the recycled material at the same location, making it long-lasting as well as sustainable. Stavebni sporitelna Ceske sporitelny hopes that the Prvok home will demonstrate the possibilities for more accessible and affordable housing options throughout the Czech Republic. + Prvok Images via Prvok

See the rest here: 
Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

3XNs green-roofed offices to sport an elevated cycling path in Stockholm

June 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 3XNs green-roofed offices to sport an elevated cycling path in Stockholm

Danish architecture firm 3XN has won a design competition for Kvarter 15 (District 15), a new office that will revitalize Stockholm’s Östra Hagastaden neighborhood with eye-catching architecture, public spaces and an elevated pedestrian and cyclist pathway that will connect the city with the nature-rich Hagaparken and Brunnsviken. Conceived as both a destination and an experience for the surrounding community, the mixed-use building will offer flexible office spaces for tenants and new attractions and amenities for the public. Moreover, the building will be engineered to protect the adjacent park from the noise and environmental pollution from the nearby highway. Green roofs will help retain rainwater as well. Developed for Swedish real estate company Atrium Ljungberg, Kvarter 15 will occupy a long, wedge-shaped plot and provide a new connection to Stockholm’s northern city gate from the old “quarry” to the public Hagaparken park and lake Brunnsviken. The adjacent Hagaparken shaped the design of the building, which features an undulating profile and terraced levels along its east facade for a smooth visual transition between the building and the park. The lower terraces will connect to the elevated pathway for pedestrians and cyclists, and portions of the roof will be landscaped and possibly topped with solar panels. In contrast, its western facade that faces the city more strongly resembles its urban neighbors. Related: 3XN unveils LEED Platinum-seeking Forskaren innovation center in Stockholm The undulating facade has also been engineered to allow for numerous flexible office spaces optimized for natural light and views of Hagaparken and Brunnsviken. Ground-level retail, restaurants, cafes, new urban spaces and landscaped plazas will activate the streetscape to aid in the urban revitalization of Östra Hagastaden. The offices will be designed to encourage “social synergies” and collaboration between the building tenants. ”There is a need to create spaces that stimulate people’s imagination and creativity,” said Jan Ammundsen, 3XN’s senior partner in charge of the project. “In a complex building with many tenants, it’s crucial to provide options for knowledge sharing and inspiration across the various organizations and people.” + 3XN Images via 3XN

Read the original post: 
3XNs green-roofed offices to sport an elevated cycling path in Stockholm

Organic vegan restaurant named to raise awareness for deforestation in Brazil

June 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Organic vegan restaurant named to raise awareness for deforestation in Brazil

Recently opened in the Brazilian city of São Paulo and designed by local architecture and design practice VAGA, the Cajuí Restaurant offers a menu of vegan , organic and natural ingredients supplied by small farmers from different regions of Brazil. Cajuí was named after the native species of cashew found in the Cerrado biome grasslands in central Brazil. Lesser known yet right next door to the Amazon rainforest , the Cerrado biome encompasses almost 800,000 square miles of savannas and grasslands — roughly the size of Alaska and California put together — and is one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems on Earth. It is home to 5% of the planet’s biodiversity, and many of the country’s indigenous people who live there rely on the ecosystem’s resources for sustainable livelihoods. According to the World Wildlife Fund , deforestation in the Cerrado is responsible for an estimated 250 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year; this is the same amount that 53 million cars would emit in one year. Related: Modular materials make up an eco-friendly restaurant in Taiwan Cajuí Restaurant is the brainchild of plant-based chef and São Paulo-native Natalia Luglio, who wanted to open an accessible restaurant in her hometown that prioritized organic , local ingredients. The unique biome of Cerrado serves not only as inspiration behind the name but also as an inspiration behind both the menu and the ambiance. Because of this, the designers wanted to pay special attention to the vibrant interaction between color, light and material in ways that alluded to the Cerrado. The architects concentrated on creating ample natural light in between the exterior and the interior spaces by attaching an additional wooden structure to the body of the main building, which had been renovated. VAGA also added translucent roof tiles lined with organic jute on the ceiling so that the sunlight could shine through and influence the color depending on the time of day. The red pigment in the cement floor of the restaurant mirrors the color of the Cerrado soil. Large plant beds were added to the staff area to hold some of the ingredients used on the menu. To keep the construction as sustainable as possible, almost all of the waste generated from the renovation was reused for additional projects, such as the waiting area deck, floor leveling and the bamboo ceiling in the back of the building. + VAGA Photography by Pedro Napolitano Prata via VAGA

See more here:
Organic vegan restaurant named to raise awareness for deforestation in Brazil

Gensler upcycles an old warehouse into creative offices in Austin

June 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Gensler upcycles an old warehouse into creative offices in Austin

At the heart of East Austin, an old and uninviting warehouse has been transformed into a creative office building fittingly dubbed UPCycle after its site-sensitive design approach that includes the reuse of the entire building. Gensler led the renovation and updated the space with an additional 16,000 square feet of mezzanine area as well as energy-efficient improvements including new insulation and high-efficiency mechanical systems. The industrial character of the original building has been retained and celebrated as part of an overarching goal to preserve a piece of East Austin history.  Originally built in 1972, the 65,000-square-foot warehouse had originally been used as the former location of the Balcones Recycling Center. Drawing inspiration from the building history, the architects sought to reuse the entire building and integrate reclaimed materials in creative ways. All components found onsite — from the steel structure and metal panel skin to the existing railroad tracks and graffiti art from past exhibitions — were reclaimed or preserved and enhanced. Even the building skin was repurposed and turned inside out to reveal its natural finish. Related: Adobe’s renovated headquarters channels the design giant’s creative energy “By recycling and upcycling 95% of the existing building, approximately 1,830,000 kilograms of embodied carbon dioxide were saved, and the lid of the existing structure significantly lengthened,” Gensler said in a project statement. “This savings amounts to the equivalent of taking nearly 450 cars off the road.” Expanded to 81,711 square feet, UPCycle now serves as a multi-tenant creative office building. In addition to repurposed materials , the building has been updated with new elements, such as butterfly trusses covered in graffiti by local artists and a new roof with clerestory windows to bring more natural light indoors. To pay homage to the site’s direct access to the adjacent rail lines, Gensler created a new entry lounge from a converted boxcar placed on the building’s original railroad tracks and fitted it with seating, WiFi and music. + Gensler Photography by Dror Baldinger via Gensler

More here:
Gensler upcycles an old warehouse into creative offices in Austin

COVID-19 outbreak shuts down Tyson plant in Iowa

June 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on COVID-19 outbreak shuts down Tyson plant in Iowa

Tyson Foods, Inc. closed an Iowa pork plant for deep cleaning after 22% of its workforce tested positive for coronavirus . Plant officials announced the closure last Thursday, with plans to reopen by the end of this week. Many meat processors around the country have experienced COVID-19 outbreaks, as the industry is notoriously unable to social distance. Tyson reported that it required employees to wear masks and that the northwestern Iowa plant had an extensive coronavirus testing protocol. Unfortunately, delayed test results probably added to the spread, which has resulted in 555 positive tests out of 2,517 employees. Related: How to stock a vegan pandemic pantry “I honestly feel like the company has failed its employees,” Mayra Lopez, vice president of the Storm Lake League of United Latin American Citizens of Iowa , told the Des Moines Register . “With 555 cases confirmed, that seems pretty steep.” She said friends and family who work there told her that it took up to a week to get test results. “By the time they get the results, it could be too late and they’ve passed it on to someone else,” she said. In late April, the Trump administration released an executive order to keep meatpacking plants open despite the virus. “It is important that processors of beef, pork, and poultry (“meat and poultry”) in the food supply chain continue operating and fulfilling orders to ensure a continued supply of protein for Americans,” the order decreed. Since the beginning of the pandemic, Tyson Foods has temporarily closed plants in Iowa, Nebraska, Indiana and Washington State. Most have since reopened. Forty-four meatpacking workers have died so far of COVID-19, with more than 3,000 testing positive. United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) has criticized the Trump administration, saying it should do more to protect workers. Before the pandemic, the plant at Storm Lake killed approximately 17,250 pigs daily, accounting for about 3.5% of U.S. pork production. Via Reuters and Des Moines Register Image via Pixabay

Original post: 
COVID-19 outbreak shuts down Tyson plant in Iowa

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1967 access attempts in the last 7 days.