Measure What Matters: Corporate Sustainability and its Impact on Business Strategies

June 22, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Measure What Matters: Corporate Sustainability and its Impact on Business Strategies Date/Time: July 15, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) Join experts from data, benchmarking, and advisory services firm ISS Corporate Solutions for a discussion about ESG materiality and the positive impact it can have across your company’s sustainability goals. Topics include: How corporations can efficiently leverage ESG rater data to benchmark and inform engagement strategy with shareholders and other stakeholders Materiality in the context of company strategy, sustainability frameworks, and raters Navigating corporate sustainability resources to most effectively shape your corporate ESG narrative Moderator: Heather Clancy, Vice President & Editorial Director, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Nicole Bouquet, Head of Sustainability Advisory, ISS Corporate Solutions Marija Kramer, Managing Director & Head, ISS Corporate Solutions If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Tue, 06/22/2021 – 12:45 Heather Clancy VP, Editorial Director GreenBiz Group @GreenTechLady Nicole Bouquet Head of Sustainability Advisory ISS Corporate Solutions Marija Kramer Managing Director & Head ISS Corporate Solutions gbz_webcast_date Thu, 07/15/2021 – 10:00 – Thu, 07/15/2021 – 11:00

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Measure What Matters: Corporate Sustainability and its Impact on Business Strategies

Ethics, Compliance and Risk: Creating a Shared ESG Vision

June 21, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Ethics, Compliance and Risk: Creating a Shared ESG Vision Date/Time: July 20, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) Sustainability has long been a practice for many forward-thinking businesses. But a renewed focus on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues from investors, employees, customers and regulators has driven corporate ethics and compliance (E&C) groups to become more involved in sustainability and ESG programs. This challenges ESG leaders to find alignment across teams, educate new practitioners on sustainability best practices, and ultimately develop a shared vision of ESG goals and progress.  How can you best navigate this new paradigm? Join representatives from NAVEX Global, Applied Materials and PwC to hear firsthand experiences and guidance around the growing relationship between E&C and sustainability and ESG teams. Among the things you’ll learn: How ESG intersects with risk, ethics and compliance How corporate teams are making ESG work across the business How companies can efficiently act on ESG plans and mitigate risk Moderator: Joel Makower, Chairman & Executive Editor, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Karen Alonardo, VP ESG Solutions, NAVEX Global Chris Librie, Director of ESG, Applied Materials Sunita Suryanarayan, Partner, Risk & Regulatory, PwC If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Mon, 06/21/2021 – 11:16 Joel Makower Chairman & Co-founder GreenBiz Group @makower Karen Alonardo Vice President, ESG Solutions NAVEX Global Chris Librie Director, ESG Applied Materials Sunita Suryanarayan Partner, Risk & Regulatory PwC gbz_webcast_date Tue, 07/20/2021 – 10:00 – Tue, 07/20/2021 – 11:00

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Ethics, Compliance and Risk: Creating a Shared ESG Vision

Ethics, Compliance and Risk: Creating a Shared ESG Vision

June 21, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Ethics, Compliance and Risk: Creating a Shared ESG Vision Date/Time: July 20, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) Sustainability has long been a practice for many forward-thinking businesses. But a renewed focus on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues from investors, employees, customers and regulators has driven corporate ethics and compliance (E&C) groups to become more involved in sustainability and ESG programs. This challenges ESG leaders to find alignment across teams, educate new practitioners on sustainability best practices, and ultimately develop a shared vision of ESG goals and progress.  How can you best navigate this new paradigm? Join representatives from NAVEX Global, Applied Materials and PwC to hear firsthand experiences and guidance around the growing relationship between E&C and sustainability and ESG teams. Among the things you’ll learn: How ESG intersects with risk, ethics and compliance How corporate teams are making ESG work across the business How companies can efficiently act on ESG plans and mitigate risk Moderator: Joel Makower, Chairman & Executive Editor, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Karen Alonardo, VP ESG Solutions, NAVEX Global Chris Librie, Director of ESG, Applied Materials Sunita Suryanarayan, Partner, Risk & Regulatory, PwC If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Mon, 06/21/2021 – 11:16 Joel Makower Chairman & Co-founder GreenBiz Group @makower Karen Alonardo Vice President, ESG Solutions NAVEX Global Chris Librie Director, ESG Applied Materials Sunita Suryanarayan Partner, Risk & Regulatory PwC gbz_webcast_date Tue, 07/20/2021 – 10:00 – Tue, 07/20/2021 – 11:00

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Ethics, Compliance and Risk: Creating a Shared ESG Vision

New Sodexo Montreal offices include "Quality of Life" spaces

June 21, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Commercial buildings completely focused on function often lose the opportunity to deliver mental and physical health features to employees as part of a comprehensive plan. Following the planning and recent completion of the new Sodexo Montreal building, located overlooking the Lachine Canal in Montreal, it’s no surprise the resulting offices invite a well-rounded recipe of collaboration, peace of mind and wellness. Sodexo, a multifaceted business that offers food, facility management and workplace services, among other things, maintains a focus on corporate responsibility and sustainable actions. To continue in that example, it occupies an industrial building originally constructed in 1908. For the new offices, Sodexo enlisted L’Abri , an architectural design firm that specializes in sustainable construction. Along with contractor Modulor, the team worked closely with another Montreal-based design team at Vives St-Laurent for the adaptive reuse project. Related: This BREEAM office is a reconstructable wooden “cathedral” to nature The resulting design places all the offices against the window side of the building in order to take advantage of natural light and offer views of the surrounding landscape. Interior meeting rooms are also well-lit as a result of high ceilings and large openings throughout the floorplan. Sleek, modern furnishings fill the spaces, yet the architecture exposes the original brick walls, mill floor and wood structure for contrast. Closed rooms encourage focused work and meditation with warm textiles throughout. The interior design includes copious plants for air filtration and general wellness, while natural materials, such as wood, are used to forge a connection with nature. In the center of the activity is the test kitchen, which employees are welcome to use. With the implementation of a network of sensors to collect real-time data on the use of spaces, the building will continue to improve resource- and energy-efficiency over time. The system will monitor activity and optimize the quality of air, water, light, sound and materials for this and future projects. The space was built to balance function, aesthetics, health of the employee and preservation of the environment. This is all in alignment with Sodexo’s motto of offering “Quality of Life Services.” + L’Abri Photography by Raphaël Thibodeau via v2com

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New Sodexo Montreal offices include "Quality of Life" spaces

Episode 273: Apple’s ‘bully pulpit’, Xerox’s climate tech agenda

June 18, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Episode 273: Apple’s ‘bully pulpit’, Xerox’s climate tech agenda GreenBiz Editors Fri, 06/18/2021 – 01:45 This is not the PC industry’s PARC (6:30) The Palo Alto Research Center, the storied research and development division at Xerox, is getting hot and heavy into climate tech. Jessy Rivest, general manager of the Xerox cleantech business, drops by to chat about one of its projects, an electrochemical approach to air conditioning. Circularity 21 in Review (15:00) The co-hosts of the leading North American conference on the circular economy, GreenBiz analysts Lauren Phipps and Suz Okie, drop by to discuss highlights. Featuring segments from: Billy Almon, astrobiofuturist Adam Minter, author, “Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade” Lisa Jackson, vice president, environmental, policy and social initiatives, Apple  Deborah Dull, principal, manufacturing product management, GE Digital  Meet more of the GreenBiz 30 Under 30 (40:55) We hear from three more members from the 2021 cohort of our report recognizing rising young stars in sustainability: Elisabeth Anna Resch, advisor, global impact initiatives, United Nations Global Compact Dawnielle Tellez, senior sustainability analyst, REI Yashi Shreshta, director, science and research, Novi  *Music in this episode: “Curiosity,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Sad Marimba Planet,” “As I Was Saying,” “Slow Lights” and “More on That Later” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast Circular Economy 30 Under 30 Circularity 21 Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 49:23 Sponsored Article Off

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Episode 273: Apple’s ‘bully pulpit’, Xerox’s climate tech agenda

How will you recognize Juneteenth?

June 18, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

How will you recognize Juneteenth? Susan Hunt Stevens Fri, 06/18/2021 – 00:05 Editor’s Note: The GreenBiz Group team honors Juneteenth on Friday as a time of reflection about the broader imperative to support diversity, equity and inclusion and the more specific intersection between environmental justice and sustainability. This essay originally appeared on the WeSpire blog and is republished with permission. Opal Lee’ s first march to make Juneteenth a federal holiday was around her church in Fort Worth, Texas. As she described it to NPR , “I got together some people here. We had a rally, and so after the rally, the people walked with me, and we’ve been going ever since.” Opal Lee ended up walking all the way to Washington, D.C., in 2016. Quite the undertaking but even more inspiring because she was 90. She has continued to push Congress since. At this writing, her petition  on Change.org has 1.6 million signatures. Last year, she finally saw legislation introduced, on Juneteenth, to make it a holiday. It didn’t pass then but  has been reintroduced this year. (Editor’s note: Since this article was first published, both chambers of the U.S. Congress overwhelmingly have voted to establish Juneteenth as a federal holiday. President Joe Biden signed the bill into law Thursday.)  What is Juneteenth? Juneteenth celebrations began in Texas 150 years ago to commemorate the day that news of the Emancipation Proclamation finally reached Galveston, nearly 2.5 years after it was issued. Texas made it a state holiday in 1980. Since then, 47 states have added it as a state holiday or observance. A growing number of companies such as Quicken Loans, Nike, Citigroup, Target and, yes, WeSpire, observe it as a paid holiday. Major banks, including JPMorgan Chase, Capital One, PNC and Fifth Third, close early. For many who celebrate Juneteenth, it’s an opportunity to teach African-American heritage and culture. Traditions include reading the Emancipation Proclamation, singing traditional gospel songs and reading works by noted writers such as Ralph Ellison and Maya Angelou. Barbecue and soul food anchor many a celebration and red food and drinks  are served, a symbol of ingenuity and resilience in bondage. We need to be aware that we can do so much more together than being apart. For Lee, commemorating the holiday means more than recognizing a historical moment. It’s about embracing unity and equity more boldly as a nation. She points out in her petition that slaves didn’t free themselves and that they had help from allies — politicians, abolitionists, soldiers and others who gave their lives for freedom of the enslaved. “We need to be aware that we can do so much more together than being apart,” Lee told CNN . “We can pull our resources (together), learn from each other, and make the world a better place to live.” Continuing to strive for equity, unity and justice It is that sentiment that ultimately drove our decision to celebrate Juneteenth at WeSpire. We need as leaders to acknowledge that the work of emancipation is still not done: not in our companies, our cities or our nation. We must actively do more, every day, to bring about racial equity, unity and justice. It starts by increasing awareness and education, but ultimately it requires changing our behaviors. How we hire and promote. How we treat people in meetings. Who we choose to mentor and sponsor. Who we sit with at lunch and include in the casual, informal after-work events. And take it from someone who knows a lot about behavior change : This work is hard. But it’s arguably the most important work we can be doing. Inclusive , equitable businesses are better, stronger businesses. Inclusive equitable communities are better, stronger communities. And inclusive, equitable nations are ultimately better, stronger nations. By taking a day to honor and celebrate when we did the right thing as a nation, we also will have an opportunity to reflect, and recommit to fixing, all that we still haven’t gotten right. So if you haven’t asked your company or school to make Juneteenth a holiday, go ask. If you’ve never celebrated it, start. The promise of emancipation may have started in 1863, but it’s up to us to see it through. Pull Quote We need to be aware that we can do so much more together than being apart. Topics Social Justice Racial Justice Diversity and Inclusion Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off A young protester and celebrant of Juneteenth holds a sign that reads “I am my ancestors’ wildest dream” at Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, D.C. Shutterstock Allison C. Bailey Close Authorship

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How will you recognize Juneteenth?

How will you recognize Juneteenth?

June 18, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

How will you recognize Juneteenth? Susan Hunt Stevens Fri, 06/18/2021 – 00:05 Editor’s Note: The GreenBiz Group team honors Juneteenth on Friday as a time of reflection about the broader imperative to support diversity, equity and inclusion and the more specific intersection between environmental justice and sustainability. This essay originally appeared on the WeSpire blog and is republished with permission. Opal Lee’ s first march to make Juneteenth a federal holiday was around her church in Fort Worth, Texas. As she described it to NPR , “I got together some people here. We had a rally, and so after the rally, the people walked with me, and we’ve been going ever since.” Opal Lee ended up walking all the way to Washington, D.C., in 2016. Quite the undertaking but even more inspiring because she was 90. She has continued to push Congress since. At this writing, her petition  on Change.org has 1.6 million signatures. Last year, she finally saw legislation introduced, on Juneteenth, to make it a holiday. It didn’t pass then but  has been reintroduced this year. (Editor’s note: Since this article was first published, both chambers of the U.S. Congress overwhelmingly have voted to establish Juneteenth as a federal holiday. President Joe Biden signed the bill into law Thursday.)  What is Juneteenth? Juneteenth celebrations began in Texas 150 years ago to commemorate the day that news of the Emancipation Proclamation finally reached Galveston, nearly 2.5 years after it was issued. Texas made it a state holiday in 1980. Since then, 47 states have added it as a state holiday or observance. A growing number of companies such as Quicken Loans, Nike, Citigroup, Target and, yes, WeSpire, observe it as a paid holiday. Major banks, including JPMorgan Chase, Capital One, PNC and Fifth Third, close early. For many who celebrate Juneteenth, it’s an opportunity to teach African-American heritage and culture. Traditions include reading the Emancipation Proclamation, singing traditional gospel songs and reading works by noted writers such as Ralph Ellison and Maya Angelou. Barbecue and soul food anchor many a celebration and red food and drinks  are served, a symbol of ingenuity and resilience in bondage. We need to be aware that we can do so much more together than being apart. For Lee, commemorating the holiday means more than recognizing a historical moment. It’s about embracing unity and equity more boldly as a nation. She points out in her petition that slaves didn’t free themselves and that they had help from allies — politicians, abolitionists, soldiers and others who gave their lives for freedom of the enslaved. “We need to be aware that we can do so much more together than being apart,” Lee told CNN . “We can pull our resources (together), learn from each other, and make the world a better place to live.” Continuing to strive for equity, unity and justice It is that sentiment that ultimately drove our decision to celebrate Juneteenth at WeSpire. We need as leaders to acknowledge that the work of emancipation is still not done: not in our companies, our cities or our nation. We must actively do more, every day, to bring about racial equity, unity and justice. It starts by increasing awareness and education, but ultimately it requires changing our behaviors. How we hire and promote. How we treat people in meetings. Who we choose to mentor and sponsor. Who we sit with at lunch and include in the casual, informal after-work events. And take it from someone who knows a lot about behavior change : This work is hard. But it’s arguably the most important work we can be doing. Inclusive , equitable businesses are better, stronger businesses. Inclusive equitable communities are better, stronger communities. And inclusive, equitable nations are ultimately better, stronger nations. By taking a day to honor and celebrate when we did the right thing as a nation, we also will have an opportunity to reflect, and recommit to fixing, all that we still haven’t gotten right. So if you haven’t asked your company or school to make Juneteenth a holiday, go ask. If you’ve never celebrated it, start. The promise of emancipation may have started in 1863, but it’s up to us to see it through. Pull Quote We need to be aware that we can do so much more together than being apart. Topics Social Justice Racial Justice Diversity and Inclusion Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off A young protester and celebrant of Juneteenth holds a sign that reads “I am my ancestors’ wildest dream” at Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, D.C. Shutterstock Allison C. Bailey Close Authorship

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How will you recognize Juneteenth?

WSU Everett building sets the gold standard for campus design

June 17, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The Washington State University Everett building is setting the tone for the brand-new WSU branch campus . The new campus will expand access to STEM-focused programs, and the new building truly pays homage to this field of study. This is the building that will define the campus. Paired with Everett Community College across the street, the campus creates an entire education district where students can seek higher learning of all types. The campus is 1.5 acres. The west edge of the building traces North Broadway, a bustling street. On the south side is a broad plaza , a unifying area where busy students will walk by on their way to class. On the north side, there’s a courtyard made for studying, events, quiet reflection and activities. Related: PSU’s LEED Platinum School of Business features regionally sourced timber The building includes a four-story atrium known as the Innovation Forum. This area connects two entry points. Inside the building, you can also find a tiered lecture hall, a media-rich classroom , student service areas and a student lab. The building also includes faculty offices, conference rooms, classrooms, student seminar rooms and engineering labs. A wood staircase is the highlight of the atrium. It is custom-bent and made with glued lamella stringers. The staircase was made from regional materials and pays homage to the Pacific Northwest timber industry. As for the project’s sustainable features, the Everett building is LEED-Gold certified. In fact, the building’s thermal envelope exceeds state energy code standards by 10%. Meanwhile, the windows and louvers are mechanically operable to provide natural ventilation. The hydronic radiant floor reuses heat taken from the building’s data center, and an array of photovoltaics on the roof helps provide energy. There’s also a 20,000-gallon cistern that captures rainwater. This system provides 100% of the toilet and urinal flushing water needed from September to June while diverting excess to irrigation. + SRG Partnership Photography © Benjamin Benshneider

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WSU Everett building sets the gold standard for campus design

FreeWater is the startup connecting people to free, clean water

June 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

A new  philanthropic  marketing startup based out of Austin, Texas is providing companies with a way to advertise while doing good. FreeWater provides beverages in eco-friendly, BPA-free packaging paid for by the ads printed directly onto the bottles. Companies can choose to either distribute them for free or sell them for a profit. Beverages are packaged in  aluminum  bottles or paper cartons. FreeWater will donate 10 cents from each beverage to charities that build water wells for people in need in Africa. “When you do the math, we only need 10% of Americans to choose our free product so we can solve the global water crisis permanently,” said Josh Cliffords, Founder + CEO. “That’s water wells or systems put in place for 800 million people in need. And each time we introduce a new product it will donate to a different charitable cause.” Related: Nonprofit Washed Ashore crafts art and jewelry from ocean plastic Cliffords created the  startup  after volunteering with refugees who had little access to clean water. According to FreeWater, 800 million people are living without safe drinking water, and 3.6 billion people live in areas that suffer from water scarcity at least one month per year. “I wanted to change the experience of giving to charity and giving back to society and make it as simple as drinking a free bottle of water or eating a free slice of pizza,” Cliffords explained. “Because if saving a life or the environment was that simple, everyone would do it.” FreeWater has two separate  business  models. Its B-to-B model lets advertisers choose to distribute products for free or for a profit, while its B-to-C model features only free water options. Advertisers can connect QR codes to the packaging for consumers to scan for coupons, videos, food orders, surveys, download music, movies, tv shows, video games, augmented reality and more. The company also forms partnerships with other  nonprofit  organizations and community outlets. These partners can use FreeWater as fundraising material by selling the ad space themselves, and FreeWater will grant between 10 cents and 25 cents per beverage to the partner. + Juice Consulting Images via Juice Consulting

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FreeWater is the startup connecting people to free, clean water

Scientists use bacteria to turn plastic waste into vanilla flavoring

June 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Scientists have converted plastic bottles into vanilla flavoring using genetically engineered bacteria. According to research published in the journal Green Chemistry , genetically engineered E-Coli bacteria has been used to convert terephthalic acid (TA) from plastic waste into vanillin. Joanna Sadler, co-author of the study, said, “This is the first example of using a biological system to upcycle plastic waste into a valuable industrial chemical and it has very exciting implications for the circular economy.” Related: Scientists create super-enzyme to degrade plastic bottles 6 times faster Terephthalic acid is a basic compound obtained when plastic bottles are broken down by enzymes. Last year, scientists developed mutant enzymes that could break plastic bottles into their basic units. The result of that process is that plastic bottles are converted into TA. Researchers have used the basic product from enzymes’ work on plastic bottles to develop industrially important products. They warmed microbial broth to 37°C for a day. As a result, 79% of TA was converted into vanillin. Vanillin is a product naturally extracted from vanilla beans. The product is commonly used in the cosmetics and food industries. It is also an important raw material for pharmaceutical companies and is used in herbicides . Although vanillin can be naturally extracted from vanilla beans, its demand has been higher than the supply in recent times. Based on 2018 data, the global demand for vanillin was 37,000 metric tons. Due to the deficiency, 85% of the product is synthesized from chemicals derived from fossil fuels . The recent discovery could be a way of improving the supply of vanillin if it can be made commercially viable. “Our work challenges the perception of plastic being a problematic waste and instead demonstrates its use as a new carbon resource from which high-value products can be made,” said Stephen Wallace, study author from the University of Edinburgh, as reported by The Guardian . Plastic bottles are one of the top ocean pollutants after plastic bags, according to recent research. “This is a really interesting use of microbial science to improve sustainability,” said Ellis Crawford of the Royal Society of Chemistry. “Using microbes to turn waste plastics, which are harmful to the environment, into an important commodity is a beautiful demonstration of green chemistry.” + Green Chemistry Via The Guardian Image via Pixabay

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Scientists use bacteria to turn plastic waste into vanilla flavoring

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