Community-based complex in Moscow is a winning design

December 10, 2021 by  
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UNStudio won its submission for 31 Krzhizhanovskogo Street that marries cultural relevance with modern amenities. The competition was by Citymakers for project developer Glavstroy for a residential complex in Moscow that incorporates the heritage of the region. The community-focused architectural concept is designed for 31 Krzhizhanovskogo Street (K31 Courtyard). It uses architectural elements to create natural gathering spaces. Formerly an industrial area, the city approved a new masterplan in 2012, resulting in a rapid increase of residential housing in the area. Related: Jade brings green space and passive design to Kuwait Although this means the area is benefitting from a modern brushstroke, UNStudio placed an emphasis on historical elements. This could be seen in the brick and black metal exterior on the podium façade that resembles other buildings in the area, while speaking to the industrial elements of the region’s past. Other portions of the building impart a translucence with expansive windows that allow the upper levels to blend into the sky, rather than creating a blockade. “The inner façade of the courtyard employs a similar lightness to the tower volumes, with natural wood creating a strong connection to the green, tree-planted courtyard and a warm and comfortable atmosphere for the residents,” said UNStudio. In addition to multi-use housing, the complex includes a kindergarten, fitness center, commercial spaces, underground parking and a park in the courtyard. These components address the modern challenges of creating sustainable communities in a Megalopolis. Similarly, building up instead of across provides more housing with minimal site impact .  K31 Courtyard hopes to stand as an example for future developments that are similarly aimed at a residents-first approach. In addition to the courtyard, landing pads on each level provide gathering spaces indoors and outdoors, along with areas for greenhouses, plants and urban gardens. The placement of the towers around the courtyard and the stepped terraces were designed to provide maximum views and natural light to the interior of the apartments. The apartments themselves offer a variety of styles to suit the needs of small or large families. This is a central element in the concept of making the complex a neighborhood within itself that is also centrally-located and adjacent to pedestrian routes nearby. + UNStudio Images via MARTA Pictures & ZOA 3D

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Community-based complex in Moscow is a winning design

Sustainability: An Operational Imperative for Commercial Building Owners and Tenants

December 7, 2021 by  
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Study finds 93% U.S companies view sustainability is a lasting trend. Many companies are conducting major sustainability initiatives to improve the efficiency of their operations and reduce impact on the environment. The initiatives are taken for reasons ranging from lowering the operating costs of their buildings to complying with regulations or from satisfying client demand for efficient tenant space. In fact, according to a new survey conducted by Honeywell and The Business Journals eight of ten U.S. companies surveyed say that sustainability is an operational imperative and they have initiatives in place, while 70% say they have integrated sustainability into their strategic planning processes. To get more insight into the top priorities’ companies expect to take over the next year and the role tenants have in the sustainability initiatives they seek from their building owners, download this paper created by Honeywell and The Business Journals documenting the sustainability landscape for commercial buildings.

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Sustainability: An Operational Imperative for Commercial Building Owners and Tenants

Committing to Net Zero: How Businesses are Meeting Their Carbon Pledge

December 1, 2021 by  
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Study finds 87% of U.S. companies view sustainability as a long-term investment rather than a cost. Leaders of large U.S. companies have realized that sustainability is key to their success. The energy efficiency of the buildings they own and/or lease has become a top priority. This impacts portfolio and facility managers overseeing building management, maintenance, refurbishing and construction, as well as vendors and commercial real estate professionals who support these efforts. In fact, the top priorities for sustainability initiatives companies expect to take over the next year will focus on the physical spaces where they operate, according to a new survey conducted by Honeywell and The Business Journals and 84% of respondents believe their companies can generate economic value by identifying and addressing social problems that intersect with their companies. To get more insight on the initiatives companies are taking, download this paper created by Honeywell and The Business Journals documenting the sustainability landscape for commercial buildings.

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Committing to Net Zero: How Businesses are Meeting Their Carbon Pledge

Cranbrook School teaches environmental stewardship

July 27, 2021 by  
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Education comes in all forms — books, videos, audio recordings and interactive, hands-on, learning like that taking place at Cranbrook School in the Wolgan Valley, located about three hours north of Sydney, Australia. Students on this campus share experiences uncommon to mainstream education, mainly in the way they are relied upon to actively participate in the buildings’ and site’s upkeep. The idea is to educate students about a host of life skills such as gardening, homemaking, fire-building and even constructing in a hands-on ‘rituals of stewardship’ approach. The campus is the result of a competition that asked designers to develop an architectural design for a new school in a rural area in the Greater Blue Mountains National Park. Andrew Burns Architecture submitted the winning project with an emphasis on the student experience. With the understanding there is no better teacher than experience, students are taught resilience through work. Along with the physical aspects of collecting wood and maintaining a fire in order to heat water for the heater, students learn about providing for others. Similarly, while they nurture the stewardship garden, they give back to the environmental remediation of the land. Related: The River School places classrooms around a central courtyard The campus merges into the natural bluff with a crescent shape for the buildings’ footprint, while still providing the utilitarian aspects of a school. This design also creates efficient access for services across the buildings. In a press release, the architects explained, “The buildings are anchored to the Crescent by a series of chimneys, recalling the remnant chimneys from the neighbouring historic town of Newnes. The buildings rise up from the Crescent to take in the dramatic form of the escarpment, illuminated by easterly morning light.” To further honor the connection with nature, the materials palette came mostly from natural sources such as wood and metal in an effort to make “the buildings…both shelter and pedagogical tools — devices to heighten the experience of landscape and environmental systems.” + Andrew Burns Architecture Via ArchDaily Photography by Brett Boardman via Andrew Burns Architecture

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Cranbrook School teaches environmental stewardship

Designing the Tesla building

November 1, 2017 by  
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As DHL, IKEA, Volvo and General Motors go, the building industry follows?

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Designing the Tesla building

Designing the Tesla building

November 1, 2017 by  
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As DHL, IKEA, Volvo and General Motors go, the building industry follows?

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Designing the Tesla building

Denver might require green roofs on new large buildings

October 27, 2017 by  
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In November, voters in Denver, Colorado will go to the polls to approve or disapprove a new ballot initiative that would require most new buildings of at least 25,000 square feet and some older buildings to include a green roof . The roofs would have to be covered with trees, vegetables or other plants that add aesthetic value and mitigate the urban heat island effect. Although the idea of green roofs is broadly popular, the mandate to require them is somewhat controversial. Nonetheless, supporters are optimistic that voters will ultimately approve the bold and beautiful policy to add even more green to the Mile High City. Denver’s proposed green roof mandate takes cues from Toronto , which implemented the policy seven years ago, becoming the first city in North America to require green roofs. Although San Francisco recently adopted a mandate for green roofs on new buildings, Denver would be the first to transform rooftops on existing buildings through the mandate. Supporters see real environmental and economic benefits from such a broad adoption of green roofs. A new study from Green Roofs for Healthy Cities and the Green Infrastructure Foundation estimated that the adopted initiative would create 57.5 million square feet of green roofs by 2033 and generate $1.85 billion in energy cost savings and other benefits over the next 40 years. “We have all these flat roofs with all this space, and we’re not doing anything with them,” said Brandon Rietheimer, the initiative’s campaign manager, according to the Denver Post . “Why aren’t we putting solar or green vegetation up there? … We hear all the time that Denver is an environmentally friendly city, yet we rank 11th for air quality and third for heat islands.” Related: Denver food desert raises $50K for first community-owned grocery store Although the idea may be appealing, it still faces a mountain of opposition before it becomes law. “I think it would be great if we all had green roofs,” said Denver City Councilwoman Mary Beth Susman. “They’re so lovely. But the mandate is what worries me. … If you have so much support for it, then why wouldn’t the market just take care of it?” Even Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has come out against the measure, stating that it was “not the right approach” for the city. Despite heavy opposition, the initiative may prove endearing to the Denver electorate, particularly in an off-year election . Political analyst Eric Sondermann said, “I think the risk to the opposition is that it’s under the radar and it just looks good, looks cutting-edge, feels good and that no one digs into it”. Via The Denver Post Images via Denver Green Roof Initiative

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Denver might require green roofs on new large buildings

Denver might require green roofs on new large buildings

October 27, 2017 by  
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In November, voters in Denver, Colorado will go to the polls to approve or disapprove a new ballot initiative that would require most new buildings of at least 25,000 square feet and some older buildings to include a green roof . The roofs would have to be covered with trees, vegetables or other plants that add aesthetic value and mitigate the urban heat island effect. Although the idea of green roofs is broadly popular, the mandate to require them is somewhat controversial. Nonetheless, supporters are optimistic that voters will ultimately approve the bold and beautiful policy to add even more green to the Mile High City. Denver’s proposed green roof mandate takes cues from Toronto , which implemented the policy seven years ago, becoming the first city in North America to require green roofs. Although San Francisco recently adopted a mandate for green roofs on new buildings, Denver would be the first to transform rooftops on existing buildings through the mandate. Supporters see real environmental and economic benefits from such a broad adoption of green roofs. A new study from Green Roofs for Healthy Cities and the Green Infrastructure Foundation estimated that the adopted initiative would create 57.5 million square feet of green roofs by 2033 and generate $1.85 billion in energy cost savings and other benefits over the next 40 years. “We have all these flat roofs with all this space, and we’re not doing anything with them,” said Brandon Rietheimer, the initiative’s campaign manager, according to the Denver Post . “Why aren’t we putting solar or green vegetation up there? … We hear all the time that Denver is an environmentally friendly city, yet we rank 11th for air quality and third for heat islands.” Related: Denver food desert raises $50K for first community-owned grocery store Although the idea may be appealing, it still faces a mountain of opposition before it becomes law. “I think it would be great if we all had green roofs,” said Denver City Councilwoman Mary Beth Susman. “They’re so lovely. But the mandate is what worries me. … If you have so much support for it, then why wouldn’t the market just take care of it?” Even Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has come out against the measure, stating that it was “not the right approach” for the city. Despite heavy opposition, the initiative may prove endearing to the Denver electorate, particularly in an off-year election . Political analyst Eric Sondermann said, “I think the risk to the opposition is that it’s under the radar and it just looks good, looks cutting-edge, feels good and that no one digs into it”. Via The Denver Post Images via Denver Green Roof Initiative

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Denver might require green roofs on new large buildings

Denver might require green roofs on new large buildings

October 27, 2017 by  
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In November, voters in Denver, Colorado will go to the polls to approve or disapprove a new ballot initiative that would require most new buildings of at least 25,000 square feet and some older buildings to include a green roof . The roofs would have to be covered with trees, vegetables or other plants that add aesthetic value and mitigate the urban heat island effect. Although the idea of green roofs is broadly popular, the mandate to require them is somewhat controversial. Nonetheless, supporters are optimistic that voters will ultimately approve the bold and beautiful policy to add even more green to the Mile High City. Denver’s proposed green roof mandate takes cues from Toronto , which implemented the policy seven years ago, becoming the first city in North America to require green roofs. Although San Francisco recently adopted a mandate for green roofs on new buildings, Denver would be the first to transform rooftops on existing buildings through the mandate. Supporters see real environmental and economic benefits from such a broad adoption of green roofs. A new study from Green Roofs for Healthy Cities and the Green Infrastructure Foundation estimated that the adopted initiative would create 57.5 million square feet of green roofs by 2033 and generate $1.85 billion in energy cost savings and other benefits over the next 40 years. “We have all these flat roofs with all this space, and we’re not doing anything with them,” said Brandon Rietheimer, the initiative’s campaign manager, according to the Denver Post . “Why aren’t we putting solar or green vegetation up there? … We hear all the time that Denver is an environmentally friendly city, yet we rank 11th for air quality and third for heat islands.” Related: Denver food desert raises $50K for first community-owned grocery store Although the idea may be appealing, it still faces a mountain of opposition before it becomes law. “I think it would be great if we all had green roofs,” said Denver City Councilwoman Mary Beth Susman. “They’re so lovely. But the mandate is what worries me. … If you have so much support for it, then why wouldn’t the market just take care of it?” Even Denver Mayor Michael Hancock has come out against the measure, stating that it was “not the right approach” for the city. Despite heavy opposition, the initiative may prove endearing to the Denver electorate, particularly in an off-year election . Political analyst Eric Sondermann said, “I think the risk to the opposition is that it’s under the radar and it just looks good, looks cutting-edge, feels good and that no one digs into it”. Via The Denver Post Images via Denver Green Roof Initiative

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Denver might require green roofs on new large buildings

Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

October 27, 2017 by  
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When Milan-based Small Architecture Workshop was asked to design a tiny sauna for a bed and breakfast in Åmot, Sweden, they wanted to do so with minimal environmental impact. The result of their efforts is this dreamy floating sauna on a lake wrapped in blackened timber to blend in with its forested surroundings. The architects built the compact structure in the span of two weeks as the first in a series of new amenities for the nearby bed and breakfast set in the middle of the forest. Located a three-hour drive from Stockholm , the bed and breakfast and accompanying sauna are an idyllic nature retreat for city dwellers. To minimize site impact , Small Architecture Workshop built the sauna on an existing wooden pier that they fixed up, thus avoiding digging and damaging the shoreline. The traditional Japanese technique of Yakisugi—more popularly known as Shou Sugi Ban—was applied to the sauna’s exterior cladding to make the timber resistant to weather, rot, and bugs. Related: Gigantic golden egg sauna warms up residents of Sweden’s northernmost town In contrast to the dark facade, the sauna is lined with light-colored alder wood. Visitors access the sauna through a covered space that serves as a dressing room and firewood storage room. Full-height glazing fronts the sauna, which can comfortably accommodate eight, to frame unobstructed views of the lake. + Small Architecture Workshop Via Dezeen Images via Small Architecture Workshop

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Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

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