Putting your best carbon footprint forward: Reductions before renewables

September 28, 2018 by  
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At Climate Week, a reminder to prioritize energy reductions over renewables purchases.

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Putting your best carbon footprint forward: Reductions before renewables

4 cost-effective ways cities can cut carbon and create jobs

August 22, 2018 by  
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Better policies for better buildings.

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4 cost-effective ways cities can cut carbon and create jobs

What’s missing in WeWork’s environmental policies — the community voice

August 20, 2018 by  
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By banning meat without input from employees or customers, the company missed a chance to make sustainability a more central part of its culture.

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What’s missing in WeWork’s environmental policies — the community voice

BIG weaves green roofs into a mixed-use development on stilts in Miami

August 16, 2018 by  
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Bjarke Ingels Group has unveiled designs for a massive mixed-use development that is elevated into the air on thin stilts. Located in the central Miami neighborhood of Allapattah, an industrial, working-class district mainly comprised of produce suppliers, the major complex will serve as a new landmark destination in the city. Dubbed Miami Produce, the project will activate the site with urban farming, restaurants, storefronts, co-working offices, co-living apartments and educational programming. Covering an area of 125,000 square meters, the Miami Produce development takes cues from its industrial surroundings, which can be seen in the buildings’ large industrial-sized floor plates that the architects say “provide maximum programmatic flexibility.” The first phase of the project will see the restoration of the existing produce warehouses, linear buildings that run the length of the site and will be renovated to house educational and commercial programs. A series of passages will be cut through the buildings to improve circulation and provide better access to the nearby metro station. The spaces between the buildings will be landscaped to create three different public spaces: campus, street and garden. To increase site density, the architects plan to add four linear warehouse -like buildings elevated on slim pillars and arranged on the perimeter of the site, creating a large open courtyard in the center. The structures will include two volumes for residential, one for offices and another for hotel. Each building will be topped with unique green roofs that offer recreational opportunities. Related: Foster + Partners unveil plans for a pair of hurricane-resistant high rises in Miami Four more buildings will be stacked in a staggered formation atop the elevated structures. “[These] buildings float above the roofs’ capes and span over the openings below, creating gateways that open up to the surrounding neighborhood while providing light and air to the rooftops,” Bjarke Ingels Group said. “The buildings function as a three dimensional urban framework designed to activate the neighborhood with varying programs and environments.” + Bjarke Ingels Group Images via BIG

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BIG weaves green roofs into a mixed-use development on stilts in Miami

This solar-powered, off-grid California guesthouse is 100% self-sustaining

August 16, 2018 by  
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Set in one of the last remaining undeveloped coastal areas in California, the Off-Grid Guest House, designed by architect Dan Weber of Anacapa and designer Steven Willson of Willson Design , is a stunning showcase of sustainable and low-impact design. The contemporary home is nestled into a steep hillside in a wildlife preserve and perfectly perched to offer breathtaking, nearly 360-degree views of the Pacific Ocean and the surrounding landscape of rolling hills and rocky outcroppings. Due to its remote location, the guest house—and the owner’s nearby main residence—are completely self-sufficient by necessity and powered with a rooftop solar panel system. Topped with a lush green roof planted with native grasses, the Off-Grid Guest House is built from durable and resilient materials including steel, concrete and glass. Full-height glazing surrounds the home, as does a wraparound outdoor balcony that’s cantilevered over the landscape and is partly sheltered by overhanging eaves. The abundance of glazing—including the glass balustrades—blurs the boundaries between inside and out and welcomes sweeping panoramic landscape views into the living spaces. “At the heart of the Owner’s objectives for this project, is preservation and protection of the natural environment,” reads the project statement on Anacapa’s website. “As such, this modern guest house is nestled into the hillside and situated on a spectacular site with ocean views. This healthy home is the pinnacle of environmentally-conscious, low-impact design and construction.” Related: A net-zero modern farmhouse kicks off a sustainable community in Texas The home operates off the grid with a photovoltaic energy system, on-site water supply and sewage treatment system that directs wastewater to a septic tank and dry well. The interior is fitted out with LEDs and low-energy appliances. Jessica Helgerson Interior Design furnished the interior with rich walnut accents and custom fixtures and furnishings. The house also includes a detached garage discreetly built into the hillside. + Anacapa + Willson Design Images via Erin Feinblatt

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This solar-powered, off-grid California guesthouse is 100% self-sustaining

Green buildings boost health, productivity and value for investors

July 27, 2018 by  
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Plus, savvy companies can use them as a recruitment tool.

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Green buildings boost health, productivity and value for investors

Show me the money: The business opportunity for grid-interactive buildings

July 19, 2018 by  
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Green building just got greener.

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Show me the money: The business opportunity for grid-interactive buildings

Why Sysco chose a new recipe for its first off-site clean energy deal

July 19, 2018 by  
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Its contract with NRG Energy reconsiders the ingredients for a power purchase agreement.

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Why Sysco chose a new recipe for its first off-site clean energy deal

Historic Danish cottage with lush seaweed roof hits the market for $414,000

July 3, 2018 by  
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Back in the Middle Ages, the Danish island of Læsø found itself with sparse building materials, leading the industrious population to start building with whatever natural materials they could find. Among these materials? Eelgrass, which they used to create extremely durable roofs that have lasted centuries. Today, the island is home to 19 original seaweed homes and one of them has just been put up for sale – a six-room cottage recently renovated with a whopping 35 tons of locally harvested eelgrass. By the late 18th century, the island had 250 remaining homes with eelgrass roofs, which are credited for the long-lasting nature of the buildings. The roofs were typically layered on in thick piles, often reaching three feet of thickness. The technique created an impressively durable insulative envelope for the homes that has helped the buildings withstand the test of time. Related: Seaweed-Clad House in Denmark Combines Natural Materials With 21st Century Building Techniques For those doubting the logic of building with sea greenery, the natural resource is incredibly sustainable, as well as non-toxic and fireproof. It can be harvested by hand and cured by the sun and wind. And, as the Danish cottages have proven, its insulative properties are as durable as any contemporary insulation . The cottage, which is currently listed for $414,000 , is a six-room home with an area of 1,076 square feet. Dating back to the 18th century, the home has been painstakingly restored to enhance its historic character. The original seaweed roof was replaced with 35 tons of seaweed locally harvested at the island’s “seaweed bank,” an initiative begun by the island for the sole purpose of restoring the remaining historic homes. The extended farmhouse has six rooms tucked into the cottage’s traditional framework. The kitchen and living spaces receive an abundance of natural light . Rustic touches such as colorful farmhouse doors and exposed ceiling beams add an old-world charm to the interior. The cottage is located on large lot of land filled with ancient apple trees, and is just minutes away from a beautiful beach. + Adam Schnack Via Treehugger Photography by Per Nielsen via Adam Schnack  

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Historic Danish cottage with lush seaweed roof hits the market for $414,000

Here’s how to move LEED forward on climate change

May 25, 2018 by  
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The green building rating system must go further.

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Here’s how to move LEED forward on climate change

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