This dynamic parking garage doubles as a public sculpture

January 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

In Denmark’s fourth-largest city of Aalborg, Copenhagen-based architecture firm Sangberg has designed a deceptively simple parking garage that offers much more than parking spaces. Dubbed the Parking House G2, the monolithic building features a dynamic and lightweight facade of extruded aluminum slats that “animates itself” in different ways depending on how and from where it’s viewed. The aluminum slats of the playful graphic facade were also engineered with reusability in mind and to encourage the growth of habitat for birds and insects.  Located in a part of Aalborg that’s currently being transformed from an industrial harbor to a new multi-use neighborhood, the Parking House G2 references the industrial heritage of its surroundings with its monolithic aluminum construction, while injecting new life with its sculptural appearance. “Whether you’re driving by in a car or you’re passing by as a pedestrian, your experience will differ as the facade animates itself in accordance to the speed travelled,” the architects said on the Sangberg blog . “The expression also changes whether it is viewed nearby or far away, from straight on or from the side – and with the light conditions and seasons.” The building’s facade gets its dynamic characteristics from the subtle variations in the profiles of the light gray aluminum slats that surround the concrete frame like a piece of cloth. In addition to creating a textural expression, the angled slats are spaced apart to let natural light and ventilation into the building. The facade also provides opportunities for greenery to take hold, a feature that was inspired by the master plan for the area that includes a green buffer zone along Nyhavnsgade, a major thoroughfare near the harbor. Related: Denmark’s first timber parking garage will be enveloped in greenery Completed over two years, the 15,200-square-meter building includes 590 parking spaces. The aluminum facade can be easily disassembled and recycled for use in other building projects. Its compact build, sustainable design, and its playful facade earned the project an Aalborg Municipality building award.  + Sangberg Images by Ramus Hjortshøj – COAST Studio

Go here to read the rest:
This dynamic parking garage doubles as a public sculpture

Fun, eco-friendly things to do in Portland

January 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Portland has boomed in the past 20 years, attracting musicians, writers, graphic designers and other creative people. Many entrepreneurial folks have started unusual businesses and events, which often surprise and delight visitors. If you’ve always wanted to visit a vegan strip club or watch an adult soapbox derby race, Portland is for you. The city of about 650,000 residents has a well-deserved reputation for rain . If you like a dry vacation, summer is your best bet. Spring is the most beautiful season, when tulips, irises and daffodils push up through the soggy ground and rhododendrons seem to bloom in every yard. Autumn enthusiasts will enjoy Portland’s fall colors. But don’t curse the rain if you get wet — it’s what makes Portland so beautiful and green. Portland outdoor adventures Outdoor adventure awaits, both within city limits and a short drive or bus ride away. The Willamette River separates Portland’s east and west sides. Running, walking and hiking are popular pastimes. On the east side, Mount Tabor, a dormant  volcano , offers hiking trails without leaving the city. Forest Park, on the west side, is even bigger, with about 70 miles of recreational trails. For a short but gorgeous Forest Park hike, take the Lower Macleay Trail along Balch Creek up to the Audubon Society, where you can check out the Wildlife Care Center which treats orphaned and injured native animals. If you happen to be in Portland on Thanksgiving, consider walking or running the annual  Tofurky Trot  5K, which benefits animal sanctuaries. Portland is well known as a bike-friendly city. You can rent a bike and explore, or join a guided tour.  Pedal Bike Tours  offers an intro to Portland tour, plus excursions focused on donuts or  beer . Their Columbia River Gorge Tour takes you out to the must-see gorge by van, where you bike and hike to waterfalls. Since Portland has access to both the Willamette and Columbia rivers, the water possibilities are vast. Join  Portland Kayak  for a guided full moon paddle on the Willamette. During summer,  eNRG Kayaking  offers SUP yoga classes. For a special Portland experience, learn about the Northwest’s favorite biped on a narrated  Bigfoot Cruise . You’ll even get the chance to smell a simulated Bigfoot pheromone (only people with strong stomachs should take a whiff). Those who like a little culture with their outdoors time will find plenty of art festivals, especially in summer. The upscale Pearl neighborhood has art openings every first Thursday of the month. From April to October, the  Urban Art Network Street Gallery  sets up an extremely accessible First Thursday show, with a chance to meet painters, jewelers, woodworkers and other skilled  artists , and find art for all budgets. Portland wellness It might seem like every other person you meet in Portland is a yoga teacher, and many neighborhoods have multiple yoga studios.  Yoga Refuge  occupies an attractive upstairs space in an older building, with plenty of light and plants to cheer up the grayest Portland days.  Studio PDX  even lets you bring your small dog to some of its classes. Portland is a city where it’s easy to find gong healing.  Portland Sound Sanctuary offers various sound healings, some including a cacao ceremony.  Awakenings Wellness Center  hosts intriguing events almost every day, such as ancestral lineage intensives, shamanic sound healing and a White Stag meditation. Common Ground Wellness Center  has a communal soaking pool and a dry cedar sauna. This clothing-optional hangout has times set aside for men, women, queer/trans and BIPOC people only, and a nightly silent hour from 10 to 11 pm. If you’re happier when everyone wears a swimsuit,  Knot Springs  is a newer facility with a delightful water circuit, sauna, eucalyptus-scented steam room and full foot rub menu. You can book massages at both Common Ground and Knot Springs.  Zama Massage Therapeutic Spa  is Portland’s only place for halo therapy in a  salt cave. The Grotto, a Catholic shrine to the Virgin Mary, is a peaceful place to visit, whether you’re religious or not. It features gardens, shrines, a labyrinth and a  meditation chapel with floor-to-ceiling windows. On a clear day, you can meditate on a view of snow-capped Mount Hood. Dining out in Portland Portland has become a city known for food, especially vegan food. At the high end, Chef Aaron Adams of  Farm Spirit  creates exquisite tasting menus from the Cascadian bioregion, with all ingredients sourced within 105 miles of the restaurant. There’s also a chef’s table experience, where you can chat with the chefs and watch as they prepare your food . The  Sudra interprets Indian food with a dash of New Mexico. Inventive plates include ingredients like turmeric-roasted Brussels sprouts, kale -infused dosas and coconut yogurt. All of this is served with a side of New Mexico green chilis, if desired. Vegetarian Thai Restaurant  KaTi Portland  makes the standard dishes, plus Thai street food and specialty entrees, with nary a drop of fish sauce. The all-vegan and gluten-free  Back to Eden  Dessert Shop on NE Alberta makes cookies, pies,  chia puddings and has an impressive sundae menu. Sweet Pea Bakery  is a real cake specialist. You can even get a tiered wedding cake or a six-layered rainbow cake. For vegan ice cream,  Eb & Bean  makes both dairy and non-dairy frozen yogurt in flavors like black sesame and salty pistachio.  Salt & Straw , Portland’s most famous ice cream shop, always features at least a few vegan flavors. Don’t miss their lemon cheesecake crumble. In nearby Milwaukie, Oregon, world-famous  Bob’s Red Mill  churns out oats, millet, sorghum, farro, and other grains. Visitors can take a tour, attend a cooking class, shop from a mind-blowing bulk section and eat lunch or breakfast. There’s also a separate veg menu. Visit during October to catch the annual two-day Portland VegFest . The newer  VegOut! Portland  Vegan Beer & Food Festival happens in  summer . Public transit It’s easy to get around Portland without driving yourself, through a combination of walking, biking, bus,  light rail and rideshare.  TriMet is the local public transit company. The MAX light rail serves the airport every day until almost midnight and is the cheapest way to get to downtown hotels. Amtrak, Bolt, Flixbus and Greyhound also serve Portland. If you see folks cruising around on heavy orange bikes built like tanks, that’s the  Biketown  bike share program. They even have a limited number of  adaptive bikes  to get people with  disabilities  on the road. Don’t want to pedal? You can also rent an electric scooter. Be advised that it’s illegal to ride scooters on the sidewalk, so stick to  bike lanes  and city streets. Also, be aware that these things pick up speed very fast when going downhill. Where to stay The  Kimpton Riverplace  puts a yoga mat in every room, has two charging stations for  electric cars  and is located right on the Willamette River waterfront path. Built in 1927, the  Heathman is both historic and eco-conscious, with low-flow shower-heads, LED lighting, walls made from recycled materials and even a ghost or two. For more eclectic lodging, check out one of Portland’s three  tiny house  hotels. Yes, three.  Caravan: The Tiny House Hotel  has five cramped but cute choices.  Tiny Digs  has eight themed units, including train car, “gypsy wagon,” barn and Victorian cottage.  Slabtown Village  bills itself as NW Portland’s luxury tiny home hotel. At Slabtown, you can also choose from three small Victorian houses if a tiny home proves too teeny. Images by Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

See more here: 
Fun, eco-friendly things to do in Portland

3XN unveils new, sustainable building for UNSW Sydney

January 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Following a rigorous international competition, Danish architectural firm 3XN has won the bid to design the University of New South Wales’ (UNSW) new Multipurpose Building — a project that the architects say will have a “focus on resilience and environmental sustainability.” Proposed for the northeast gate (Gate 9) of the UNSW main Kensington campus in Sydney, the Multipurpose Building will serve as a vibrant campus gateway close to a soon-to-open light rail station. The building will emphasize healthy indoor environments with carefully chosen materials, passive cooling, and ample daylighting. The UNSW Multipurpose Building marks the first Australian educational facility project for 3XN, which is continually expanding its portfolio abroad. Conceived as the heart of the UNSW campus, the building design combines a tower element with horizontal massing to create an L-shaped volume that’s made all the more distinctive by a staggered facade. “Our concept for this building is really special in that it offers a new  learning environment  for interdisciplinary collaboration and inspiration,” Stig Vesterager Gothelf, Architect MAA and Partner in Charge at 3XN in Copenhagen, said in a project statement. “Students will be able to observe and learn from each other in new ways, thanks to the open design concept used throughout.” Related: BIG’s LEED Gold-seeking school in Arlington features a cascade of green terraces Given the building’s proximity to a planned light rail station, the project will include a large plaza and green space to accommodate increased  pedestrian traffic . Inside, the building will include six distinct teaching and learning environments, common student facilities, event and exhibition space, workplaces, supporting and ancillary facilities and additional amenities. Using passive solar strategies, the design will also aim to minimize the building’s energy use, water use and maintenance costs. + 3XN Images via 3XN

Read the original post:
3XN unveils new, sustainable building for UNSW Sydney

This lovely lampshade is made from cabbage

January 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Lighting can set the tone of a room, so a lamp with a natural and compostable lampshade can create a cozy, gorgeous and sustainable setting. In a partnership between Indian designer Vaidehi Thakkar and London-based Nir Meiri Studio, Veggie Lights are just that — lampshades made out of red cabbage leaves that lend a warm glow to any space. A testament to the duo’s dedication to exploring and highlighting sustainable options, Veggie Lights offer a useful and elegant decor option straight from the garden. To create the lampshades, Thakkar developed the process of converting vegetables into a paper-like substance called Fiber Flats. Meiri joined the project with a passion for using organic materials, as seen from previous successes in using both mycelium and seaweed to make lampshades. Related: Algae Lamps are a work of art and natural shade in one Each lampshade in the Veggie Lights line is unique, a result of the natural variations in the leaves. Cabbage leaves may not be in the spotlight for intrinsic beauty, but through the process of separating the leaves and soaking them in a water-based color preservative, the originality of each leaf begins to shine through. The leaves are then shaped and left to dry in high temperatures, so all of the moisture evaporates. At this point, the leaves are either left unfinished, or the edges are trimmed and contoured into a gentle downward curve. The design of Veggie Lights places the bulb and electrical parts in a simple and streamlined base. This allows the light to shine upward into the shade, illuminating the natural veins and color variations in the cabbage leaf. Because the lampshades are naturally biodegradable, they will age and are meant to eventually be replaced. However, the base is long-lasting, so you can replace the shade at the end of its life for a refreshed look without producing waste . + Nir Meiri Studio + Vaidehi Thakkar Via Dezeen Image via Nir Meiri Studios

Read the rest here:
This lovely lampshade is made from cabbage

Denmarks first timber parking garage will be enveloped in greenery

January 7, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Danish architecture studios Open Platform and JAJA Architects have won an open competition to design Denmark’s first all-timber parking garage in the coastal city of Aarhus. Designed with a reduced environmental footprint, the new multilevel parking garage will be built from cross-laminated timber and partly enveloped in greenery to help contribute to the country’s goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2050. The facility has also been kept deliberately compact so as to make room on the site for a “green and creative oasis” comprising public and commercial pavilions. Created in collaboration with Rama Studio and Søren Jensen Engineers, the proposed timber parking garage will be located in Aarhus’ South Harbor neighborhood. Spanning an area of 19,300 square meters over six floors, the building will be set on the northeastern half of the site to make room for a small park. The architects plan to blur the boundaries between the building and adjacent landscape by installing a vertical garden and lush planters along the side of the wooden facade.  ”In this project, we minimize the building’s footprint and work with wooden construction and bound carbon,” said Niels Lund Petersen, architect and partner in Open Platform. “Together with the planting of a new urban forest, we secure Aarhus’ contribution to a life-long CO2-balance .” The project will further reduce its carbon footprint by encouraging green transportation; the ground floor of the building will include charging stations, cargo bicycle rentals, carpooling stops and parking spots dedicated to carpooling vehicles. The building is also connected to existing infrastructure onsite, such as the high line, Kulkransporet. Related: A striking new gateway to Copenhagen celebrates green transit and Danish design In addition to a total of 700 parking spots, the CLT parking garage will include 2,000 square meters of public facilities, including a gym, a gallery and a cafe. These spaces will be located on the ground floor and first floor of the building, as well as in the park pavilions and along the outdoor staircases and balconies. Diverse programming will help establish the building as a “hub for activity [and] creativity.” + Open Platform + JAJA Architects Images via Open Platform and JAJA Architects

Here is the original:
Denmarks first timber parking garage will be enveloped in greenery

White, latticed exoskeleton wraps a LEED Platinum office in Madrid

December 23, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on White, latticed exoskeleton wraps a LEED Platinum office in Madrid

On the side of a large roundabout in Madrid, Spanish architecture firm Rafael de La-Hoz has realized the eye-catching Oxxeo project, a five-story office building with a LEED Platinum Core & Shell certification . The energy-efficient building makes the most of its wedge-shaped plot with an asymmetrical, three-sided design, of which the geometry is emphasized with the building’s three large-scale, lattice facades with a white, rhomboidal pattern. In addition to creating greater visual interest for Oxxeo, the sculptural facade also helps mitigate unwanted solar gain. Spanning an area of 14,299 square meters, the Oxxeo office building was created with efficiency in mind, from the efficient use of energy to the smart use of space. The building’s double facade includes a glass curtain wall that floods the interior with natural light and reduces reliance on artificial lighting, while the latticed exoskeleton provides solar shading . For flexibility in the floor plan, the architects located supporting pillars inside the vertical core and in the chamfered corners to maximize the seemingly pillar-free office space. Related: This is one of the only LEED Gold-certified hotels in Spain “This building has no other concept idea than the one shown in its own construction,” Rafael de La-Hoz explained in a project statement. “This way, it is the structure, or rather the construction of its structure, or the details of the facade, or the knots and joints which generate its architectural form, or the concept.” The intersecting points for the rhomboidal lattice are spaced out at every 8.1 meters and serve as the supporting elements for the perimeters of the slabs. The corners of each rhomboid are curved to soften the facade’s appearance. The minimalist exterior is matched by a clean interior design. The building is also topped with a green roof . + Rafael de La-Hoz arquitectos Photography by Alfonso Quiroga and David Frutos via Rafael de La-Hoz arquitectos

Go here to read the rest: 
White, latticed exoskeleton wraps a LEED Platinum office in Madrid

Building a Composting Toilet

December 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech

Comments Off on Building a Composting Toilet

Although sewers and septic systems served the U.S. well in … The post Building a Composting Toilet appeared first on Earth911.com.

Original post:
Building a Composting Toilet

Waterstudio unveils the world’s first floating timber tower

November 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Waterstudio unveils the world’s first floating timber tower

Amsterdam-based design firm Waterstudio is already well-known for its incredible floating architecture, but it continues to break ground in the world of innovative design. Now, the firm, which is led by Koen Olthuis, has unveiled the world’s first floating timber tower. Slated for the waters of Rotterdam, the tower is made out of CLT and will house office space, a public green park and a restaurant with a terrace. Waterstudio’s most recent project is a contemporary take on floating architecture. The 130-foot-tall tower will be made out of cross-laminated timber, making the structure much lighter than concrete builds. Additionally, working with CLT means the building will be made with a renewable resource , providing the city of Rotterdam with a cutting-edge sustainable landmark. The tower will also make use of large expanses of glass to let plenty of natural light into the interior. Abundant vegetation, including pocket gardens planted with vegetables, will be found throughout the tower — inside and out. Related: Waterstudio.nl’s Sea Tree is a protected floating habitat for flora and fauna According to Olthuis, the building’s design is akin to a sheet of paper that has been pushed together until a tower forms in the middle. The base of the tower is located on a flat platform, which will be covered in vegetation. Rising up from the deck, the tower’s facade is marked by a series of V-shaped columns. Inside, a spacious atrium will be flooded with natural light . Although the tower will be mainly used as office space , there are several areas slated for the public. With offices located on the upper floors, the lower floors and main deck will house several publicly accessible spaces, such as a gallery and a coffee bar. Also on the lower deck, a restaurant will feature a beautiful terrace that provides stunning views of the harbor. For additional space, a lush, green courtyard will let workers and visitors enjoy fresh air day or night. This area is designed to be a flexible space for various functions and events happening year-round. + Waterstudio Images via Waterstudio

Read more here:
Waterstudio unveils the world’s first floating timber tower

This mountain-biking getaway is an energy-efficient base for adventure in Tasmania

October 31, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This mountain-biking getaway is an energy-efficient base for adventure in Tasmania

Australia’s new mountain bike trails in northeast Tasmania are now more accessible than ever thanks to Dales of Derby , a contemporary, purpose-built group housing complex that is the perfect base for adventure. Local architecture and design studio Philip M Dingemanse designed the building, which won the 2019 Barry McNeill Award for Sustainable Architecture with its energy-efficient and low-maintenance features.  A former tin-mining center, the tiny Australian town of Derby was transformed in 2015 with the opening of Blue Derby, a network of mountain bike trails that traverses some of the island’s most stunning rainforest landscapes. Tapped to design lodgings to accommodate large groups of mountain bike enthusiasts, Philip M Dingemanse created a project that would double as an introductory building to the small village of Derby. Drawing inspiration from the town’s mining history, the architects created a simple gabled form and clad the exterior with Australian vernacular corrugated metal and timber in a nod to utilitarian tin miner homes. The architects also split the gabled building into seven pieces, with four sections pulled apart, to bring the outdoors in, while the interiors are lined with wood for a warm and inviting atmosphere. Related: Energy-efficient home in Whitefish was inspired by the region’s agrarian vernacular Built to sleep a large group of up to 24 people, Dales of Derby includes bunk beds that accommodate 16 people as well as four rooms with queen-sized beds that are accessed via a red vaulted foyer inspired by a mining tunnel. At the heart of the building is a large common area with a wood heater and a full kitchen with a dining area oriented toward the forest. To reduce the project’s energy demands, the architects installed solar hot water heaters and followed passive design strategies for optimal solar orientation and thermal control. “The built form is a singular functional object separated into pieces and strung out across the hill between road and river,” the architects noted. “Gaps become significant framing moments of eucalypt forest while nighttime gable lighting castes a permanent golden hue to graying timber walls; a memory of the raw timber cut, glowing on the outskirts of the township.” + Philip M Dingemanse Photography by Luke Hesketh via Philip M Dingemanse

Read more here: 
This mountain-biking getaway is an energy-efficient base for adventure in Tasmania

Sustainable tech powers the Corten steel-clad Cube in Denmark

September 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Sustainable tech powers the Corten steel-clad Cube in Denmark

When Danish architectural firm Christensen & Co. Architects was asked to design the new headquarters for the Helsingør Power Plant, they felt it would be fitting if the project serve as an extension of the client’s commitment to sustainable supply technologies. Clad in Corten steel as a nod to the surrounding industrial architecture, the sustainably powered Forsyning Helsingør Operations Center has been dubbed The Cube after its geometric shape. For a reduced energy footprint, the office complex draws excess heat from a nearby wood-chipping plant, while rainwater is collected from the roof and reused in the building. Spanning an area of 6,000 square meters, the Forsyning Helsingør Operations Center includes the five-story Cube as well as an Operating Facilities complex that contains storage space, garages, and all the operations equipment. The ground-floor of the public-facing Cube is organized around a central light-filled atrium that connects to administrative rooms, a customer service center, as well as an exhibition area. Large skylights and full-height windows also let in ample amounts of natural light and are shielded with Corten steel solar fins . “The design for Helsingør Power Plant´s new HQ supports the narrative about the municipality’s sustainable supply technologies – from wastewater treatment to energy and waste handling,” explains Christensen & Co. Architects in their project statement. “The project comprises the Cube and Operating Facilities, two buildings that will stand adjacent to the power plant with its distinctive architecture. The facility forms a protective shield around the central working area while screening the surroundings from noise.” Related: Danish city becomes world’s first to power water treatment plant with sewage Information about the sustainable technologies used in the building and by the municipality are made available to visitors in the Cube. Visitors can also enjoy views from the ground-floor customer center to the entire building thanks to the large atrium .  + Christensen & Co. Architects Via Dezeen Images by Niels Nygaard

View original here: 
Sustainable tech powers the Corten steel-clad Cube in Denmark

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1283 access attempts in the last 7 days.