This industrial complex has a facade made from its own construction waste

September 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Located in the North India city of Kishangarh, this innovative industrial complex for Stonex India and designed by Deli-based Urbanscape Architects revolves around sustainable construction. The building features sunken courtyards with earth-cooled floors and a stone screen facade made from the complex’s own construction waste. As the main site for Stonex India, one of the country’s top marble manufacturers and suppliers, the architecture of Stonex Kishangarh had to implement stone into its design. Additionally, the company’s respect for its surroundings and for nature, as well as its central ethos — strength and perfection — had to be put on display as well. The result certainly implements all of these concepts, especially in its inspiring stone facade . Related: Award-winning Fly-Ash chair uses recycled coal byproduct The stone screen is fabricated using a combination of leftover stone from a nearby rock quarry and actual stone wastage generated from the building site itself. The screen not only provides solar shading from the southeastern and western glares but also presents a sustainable alternative to wasting stone scraps. Throughout the rest of the complex, spaces are used thoughtfully and allow for maximum potential for green covering and horticulture landscaping. Finished in 2019, the industrial complex stands at about 215,278 square feet in size. What’s more, the orientation and design of the building itself does its part to facilitate climate responsiveness through the concept of earth berming, namely the idea of building a wall of earth around the outside of a structure to achieve passive cooling. Part of the structure is sunken into the ground, combating the hot and dry regional climate to stay cool in the warmer summer months and warm during the winter. Indoor temperatures and floor slabs are regulated with radiant cooling, which allow for 60% efficiency in the structure’s running costs, according to the architects. This model has also led to HVAC load cutting by nearly 40%. + Urbanscape Architects Images via Urbanscape Architects

Read the rest here: 
This industrial complex has a facade made from its own construction waste

The Olympic House sets a new green building standard

September 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

The International Olympics Committee has a brand-new home in Lausanne, Switzerland . The stunning new Olympic House brings together 500 employees who were working at different offices scattered throughout the city. Now, these employees will work in an award-winning building that features all the latest green technology in a truly breathtaking design. Olympic House’s design centers three values: movement, flexibility and sustainability. These values show in every facet of the design. View the building from another angle, and suddenly the design looks completely different. The sweeping, elegant design sets the standard for all future buildings. The Olympic House boasts a LEED v4 Platinum building certification, with the highest score ever given (93 of 100). Minergie P. and SNBS platinum certifications further prove this building as one of the world’s most sustainable offices. Environmental concerns influence the design in more ways than one. The building connects to a beautiful park and fits perfectly with that setting. After all, this isn’t an ordinary office building. This office building houses the Olympics committee. The Olympics brings together nations and people from all around the world; that’s why the campus design allows for public enjoyment as well. As one of the most sustainable buildings ever created, the new Olympic House sets a standard for all other buildings to follow. The building even includes a green roof and multiple terraces, plus a fitness center for employees to use. Low flow taps and toilets help reduce water consumption, and rainwater capture helps provide the building with water. Meanwhile, solar panels power the Olympic House. Through green design, the Olympic House lowers carbon emissions, conserves resources, provides a healthy environment for employees and maintains green spaces. At the heart of the Olympic House, the Unity Staircase features a curving, twisting and awe-inspiring design. Hopefully, the building’s incredible design and multiple green features will inspire others to create more sustainable buildings that improve the environment, rather than damage it. + 3XN Via Architizer Images via 3XN

Original post: 
The Olympic House sets a new green building standard

The Olympic House sets a new green building standard

September 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

The International Olympics Committee has a brand-new home in Lausanne, Switzerland . The stunning new Olympic House brings together 500 employees who were working at different offices scattered throughout the city. Now, these employees will work in an award-winning building that features all the latest green technology in a truly breathtaking design. Olympic House’s design centers three values: movement, flexibility and sustainability. These values show in every facet of the design. View the building from another angle, and suddenly the design looks completely different. The sweeping, elegant design sets the standard for all future buildings. The Olympic House boasts a LEED v4 Platinum building certification, with the highest score ever given (93 of 100). Minergie P. and SNBS platinum certifications further prove this building as one of the world’s most sustainable offices. Environmental concerns influence the design in more ways than one. The building connects to a beautiful park and fits perfectly with that setting. After all, this isn’t an ordinary office building. This office building houses the Olympics committee. The Olympics brings together nations and people from all around the world; that’s why the campus design allows for public enjoyment as well. As one of the most sustainable buildings ever created, the new Olympic House sets a standard for all other buildings to follow. The building even includes a green roof and multiple terraces, plus a fitness center for employees to use. Low flow taps and toilets help reduce water consumption, and rainwater capture helps provide the building with water. Meanwhile, solar panels power the Olympic House. Through green design, the Olympic House lowers carbon emissions, conserves resources, provides a healthy environment for employees and maintains green spaces. At the heart of the Olympic House, the Unity Staircase features a curving, twisting and awe-inspiring design. Hopefully, the building’s incredible design and multiple green features will inspire others to create more sustainable buildings that improve the environment, rather than damage it. + 3XN Via Architizer Images via 3XN

More:
The Olympic House sets a new green building standard

A green roof naturally cools a bioclimatic mosque in Indonesia

September 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Jakarta-based architecture firm RAD+ar (Research Artistic Design + architecture) has recently completed the Bioclimatic Community Mosque of Pamulang, which is located about an hour south of the Indonesian capital. Designed to follow passive solar principles, the bioclimatic building departs from traditional mosque architecture in favor of optimizing indoor comfort, self-sufficiency and minimal maintenance. In addition to maximizing natural light and ventilation, the architects also topped the community mosque with an active green roof — instead of the iconic Islamic dome — in order to reduce the urban heat island effect. Spanning an area of 1,200 square meters to accommodate approximately 1,000 people, the Bioclimatic Community Mosque is more than just a place of worship. Like many mosques , the Pamulang building also functions as a community center, meeting space and recreational space for the surrounding neighborhood. RAD+ar’s strikingly contemporary design for the mosque reflects the building’s multifunctional services. Related: Henning Larsen Architects reveal plans for a new mosque in Copenhagen that marries Islamic and Nordic design Creating low-maintenance and cost-effective safeguards against the region’s extreme heat and humidity drove the design narrative and informed the architects’ decision to replace almost all of the brick partitions with over 30,000 pieces of locally produced accustomed roster block that provide privacy while allowing light and air through. “Basic geometric-volumetric approach as the sunken massing (to harness lower temperature) stacked on top of another, this allowed many level of wind speed variation crossing the building that provides total shade and extreme temperature and air pressure differences that ensure 24 hours cross ventilation & thermal chimney effect,” the architects explained in a press release. Natural lighting is also maximized throughout the building, while strategically placed openings optimize cross ventilating and the stack effect . Both indoor and outdoor spaces were crafted to provide thermal comfort; the inclusion of shaded outdoor spaces large enough to accommodate gatherings has been particularly helpful for accommodating activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. + RAD+ar Photography by William Sutanto via RAD+ar

Originally posted here:
A green roof naturally cools a bioclimatic mosque in Indonesia

A disused factory becomes an office with a landscaped bamboo roof terrace

September 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Located in Shenzhen, China, the If Factory utilizes a sustainable design that transforms an old and disused factory into a creative mix of office spaces. While the heart of the building contains a public stairway with an inclusive view of the inside, the landscaped bamboo roof terrace is an even more impressive token of the project’s combination of sustainability and community. Rather than demolish the original factory before rebuilding the office space, a project that would require extensive resources and environmental strain, the architects at MVRDV set out to renovate instead. The result is a celebration of old and new, with a simple focus on cleaning out the original building while reinventing the older components of the structure. Related: An old Brooklyn sugar refinery becomes creative office spaces For example, the architects chose to use new, transparent painting techniques to prevent the older spaces from further aging. This results in the important preservation of the original building’s history and exposed concrete frame while maintaining more modern principles of sustainability and the circular economy. New walls and balconies are made of glass. In an effort to promote exchanges between colleagues, the exterior walls are set back from the building’s frame to allow for circulation. The grand staircase is made of wood to separate the design from the surrounding concrete and glass, and it weaves its way artistically between each floor. MVRDV included windows built into the staircase so that workers can peek into other offices as a commitment to transparency and collaboration. The public roof terrace, known as “The Green House,” includes a green bamboo landscape that is arranged to form a natural maze. This unique design intentionally divides the rooftop into different sections that all contain different programming, including a dance room, a dining area and space for reading, aimed at relaxation and community. + MVRDV Via ArchDaily Images via MVRDV

More here:
A disused factory becomes an office with a landscaped bamboo roof terrace

New Arizona highrise takes sustainable luxury to another level

September 7, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New Arizona highrise takes sustainable luxury to another level

This 12-story residential tower doesn’t just boast an impressive luxury highrise  condominium  design, but also an award-winning green building design. The luxurious 7180 Optima Kierland is located in one of North Scottsdale’s most desirable areas, with lavish amenities throughout and a vertical landscape system with self-containing irrigation. The building debuted a new  green  design created by David Hovey Jr., Optima’s president and head architect. The architectural firm has already earned a reputation for its unique buildings that marry design with innovation and sustainability. Related: A massive green wall grows up the side of this luxury Italian hotel Both the rooftop and ground level feature  luxury  amenities. The 12th floor Sky Deck includes a cutting edge design that utilizes railings just beyond the skyline to create a negative-edge view, giving residents the sensation of floating above the city. The top floor Sky Deck also contains the state’s first rooftop running track, a heated lap pool, various seating areas and a spa complete with cold plunge pools, a steam room, a sauna and hydrotherapy capabilities. There is also an outdoor theater, indoor screening area, a fire pit area and an indoor/outdoor fitness studio. On the ground floor, residents enjoy an additional gym and spa, a covered dog park and dog wash, a game room, a catering room and more. Sustainable elements include perforated panels on the facade along with sun-screening louvers to create textured shadows. During construction, builders used post-tension concrete and aluminum. A variety of energy-efficient and carbon-reducing design aspects, combined with water-conserving plumbing fixtures, give the building added eco-friendly elements. The building’s most impressive  sustainable  feature has to be the innovative vertical landscape system; built-in self-containing irrigation and drainage allow for vibrant, colorful plants that start at the edge of each floor and grow up and over the building. A six-acre park accented by a water feature and landscaped with  drought-resistant , desert climate plants surrounds the building. This green space helps reduce ambient temperature, creating a microclimate that lowers the temperature by between five and nine degrees. + Optima Kierland Images via Optima Kierland

Read the original here: 
New Arizona highrise takes sustainable luxury to another level

Renewable energy lab glows like a lantern in Germany

September 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Renewable energy lab glows like a lantern in Germany

On a site formerly used for experiments on solar energy , Stuttgart-based architectural practice Behnisch Architekten has completed Building 668 (KIT Energy Lab 2.0), a massive testing lab for new energy systems as part of a scheme to move Germany toward greater adoption of renewable energy. Located at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) campus near Stuttgart, the KIT Energy Lab 2.0 is also remarkable for its eye-catching design — the timber-framed structure is wrapped in translucent polycarbonate cladding and topped with a dramatic sawtooth roof as a nod to the industrial character of the neighboring buildings. Its polycarbonate exterior allows a consistent amount of light into the simple, low-carbon building, which lights up like a lantern at night. Related: Sustainable RAUM Pavilion can be continually reused or recycled in Utrecht Completed over the course of four years, the KIT Energy Lab 2.0 spans an area of 18,621 square feet over two floors with simple layouts conducive for flexibility. The ground floor is centered on a large, double-height test hall with work areas — including the test hall and an office, meeting and IT/server room — lining the north side of the building, while the transformer rooms and control station are located on the southern end. A central stairway and elevator lead up to the second floor, which consists of additional office space, a small staff kitchen, a meeting room, lab room, control station, test preparation room and a bridge over the column-free test hall that connects to large gallery spaces. The interiors echo the simple and industrial look of the exterior. Exposed timber trusses, unpainted wooden surfaces, lofty ceiling heights and oversized lighting fixtures emphasize the industrial motif. Natural light floods the test hall, which accommodates the areas “Power-Hardware in the Loop” (PHIL) and “Smart Energy System Control Laboratory” (SESCL) as well as assembly areas for tests. The KIT Energy Lab 2.0 was created in partnership with the Helmholtz Centres, the National Aeronautics and Space Research Center of the Federal Republic of Germany (DLR) and Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ). + Behnisch Architekten Photography by David Matthiessen via Behnisch Architekten

Original post:
Renewable energy lab glows like a lantern in Germany

"Climate-neutral" Spiral Tower lets you see the city from new heights

September 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on "Climate-neutral" Spiral Tower lets you see the city from new heights

A Dutch consortium of companies has teamed up to propose an ambitious city landmark — the  Spiral Tower , an eco-friendly urban attraction, could be the “world’s first climate-neutral high-rise attraction.” KCI, Bosch Rexroth, HILLEBRAND and NorthernLight collaborated on the unique project that not only serves as an observation tower but also generates renewable energy. The Netherlands -based team has communicated with cities around the world to launch the first-ever Spiral Tower. This approach combines sustainability and tech for an immersive experience. Modeled after the London Eye and Dubai Wheel, the Spiral Tower will feature four to 16 passenger cabins, but with a smaller physical footprint. “The innovative construction lets autonomous electric cabins, that on their way down regenerate energy like an electric car , magically spiral up the tower,” says Peter Doesburg, sales manager at Bosch Rexroth. “And the cabin windows offer augmented reality information about must-see city spots, historic highlights, new urban developments and sustainable initiatives,” adds Peter Slavenburg, director of NorthernLight, the design company behind the concept. The Spiral Tower would use a lightweight steel frame and circular materials for minimal environmental impact. To meet climate-neutral targets, the proposal features integrated solar panels, vertical gardens and an urban windmill at the top. An intelligent control system would operate the tower, and the building could be combined with hotel or office programming.  Related: The “world’s first vertical cable car” will climb to a height of 138 meters in the UK Each cabin — dubbed “capsule” for its spherical shape — could hold up to 12 people, with clearly separated group areas in response to social distancing. Depending on the tower’s height, which could range between 60 to 150 meters, the time per ride would take three to 10 minutes. Rides would offer 360-degree  panoramic views  as the capsules spiral up and down the building. The designers estimate a capacity of 500,000 to 3 million visitors a year.  + Spiral Tower Via Dezeen Images by NorthernLight

Read the original here: 
"Climate-neutral" Spiral Tower lets you see the city from new heights

Self-sufficient garden-city skyscraper proposed for NYC

August 7, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Self-sufficient garden-city skyscraper proposed for NYC

International design practice Lissoni & Partners’ architecture, landscape architecture and masterplanning department Lissoni Casal Ribeiro has unveiled Skylines, a proposal for a futuristic, self-sufficient skyscraper. Developed for the Skyhive 2020 Skyscraper Challenge, the conceptual design is, in essence, a vertical city housed within a super-tall tower with mixed programming that includes residences, office spaces, a university, secondary schools, hydroponic farming, sports facilities, a hospital, cultural centers and more. The idealistic Skylines concept is meant to generate all of its own energy, food, and water onsite. Proposed for an urban lot measuring 80 meters by 130 meters, the Skylines skyscraper would consist of over 40 floors surrounded by large hanging gardens that grow within an external curtain of steel cables. The vertical city would place recycling centers, parking lots and access to a subway system underground. Retail would be located on the ground floor, followed by cultural centers, a hydroponic vegetable farming system, recreational facilities, offices, a university and other schools on the floors above. Related: Conceptual eco-village empowers women in Beirut The top floors, which look to comprise at least half the building height, would be dedicated to residential areas. Greenery would surround the building on all sides to create an image of an “vertical urban forest” and help mitigate solar heat gain and the urban heat island effect while contributing to improved air quality. “The year 2020 and the arrival of a global pandemic have indeed highlighted our weaknesses and shortcomings at a structural level, causing us to devise new ways of thinking the city and the infrastructures,” the architects said. “A system that produces, optimizes and recycles energy, a perfect microclimate that filters the air, absorbs carbon dioxide, produces humidity, reuses rainwater to irrigate the greenery, in addition to providing protection from the sun’s rays and the noise of the city. Skylines is therefore not simply an ecosystem but a cultural vision that involves social and economic processes aimed at improving the quality of life, not just a sustainable architecture but a modus vivendi.” + Lissoni & Partners Images via Lissoni Casal Ribeiro

The rest is here:
Self-sufficient garden-city skyscraper proposed for NYC

Solar-powered House of Music mimics the shape of an orchestra

August 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered House of Music mimics the shape of an orchestra

Bologna-based Mario Cucinella Architects has crafted the House of Music, a solar-powered community landmark in the nearby commune of Pieve di Cento that celebrates the town’s long-standing musical tradition. Designed to represent an orchestra with its individual instrumental sections, the timber-clad building comprises nine small, circular music rooms that connect to a central open space. The ventilated curved oak facade, a nod to musical instruments, not only helps to amplify sound like an instrument’s music box, but it also ensures high levels of energy efficiency .  Completed in 2017 after four years of planning and construction, the House of Music for Pieve di Cento is located in the former Lamborghini production area that had been previously reclaimed and transformed into a recreational park. The recently completed building benefits from an existing cycling path that connects the House of Music to the town center and beyond to an expansion area to the south. The public is encouraged to engage the building via the long curved bench that wraps around the exterior of the building and faces views of the park. Related: Mirage Architecture envisions a solar-powered glass cube for Lithuania’s national concert hall To maintain high levels of thermal inertia and sound insulation, Mario Cucinella Architects constructed the House of Music with a load-bearing masonry structure wrapped in curved oak slats. The flat roofs are topped with a series of curved and elevated disks that help deflect unwanted solar gain and are engineered to promote natural ventilation into the building. A photovoltaic array is located atop the roof as well. The energy-efficient design was informed by the architects’ bioclimatic study of the site.  The well-insulated interiors feature materials that enhance acoustics and reduce reverb. The nine music rooms open up to a central outdoor space that serves as a meeting space and area for ensemble rehearsals and recitals. The architects noted, “The House of Music’s exterior lighting makes it some sort of comforting lighthouse that encourages people to resume musical and recreational activities after the earthquake that shook the area in 2012.” + Mario Cucinella Architects Photography by Moreno Maggi via Mario Cucinella Architects

Read the original post:
Solar-powered House of Music mimics the shape of an orchestra

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 13255 access attempts in the last 7 days.