Explore Minetta Lane, a green townhouse with a climbing wall

September 16, 2021 by  
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Kushner Studios has completed a major renovation of a century-old townhouse in Minetta Lane, Greenwich Village. Glorious expansive living spaces look out onto New York’s skyline through a woven steel and foliage facade. The towering home even has its own  climbing wall! With over 4,800 square feet of interior space and 1,200 square feet of outdoor and roof space, this extensive home at Minetta Lane in Manhattan offers five bedrooms, multiple living spaces, four bathrooms, a jacuzzi, and a gym. Its 83-foot tall rock climbing wall is the tallest east of Reno, Nevada. Related: Extraordinary treehouse is a climber’s dream with its own indoor climbing wall Kushner Studios took on the $2.7 million renovation intending to leave the historical shell intact and create a new interior and vertical extension. The original streetscape was preserved. “The crossing tree limbs forming Gothic archways fronting the Minetta Street, inspired the defining narrative structure played out in the building’s newly inserted facade. The playful steel facade is covered in Ivy adding a green wall terminus to the street as an homage to the past and a vision of public good will,” a project statement explains. Interior designer Robert Isabell previously owned the townhouse and created as much streetside greenery as possible, lending the building its name as the Salad House. Evoking rural landscapes, the huge stacked chord woodpile in the triple-height living room has been harvested by hand from the owner’s property upstate and can keep the inhabitants warm via a total of nine woodburning fireplaces. This alternative heat source is in addition to the incorporation of solar panels.  Natural finishes and materials are abundant throughout the five-story home, from the floorings in wood and rope to the rustic stairs and built-in storage in naturally varied timbers . The home’s smaller service areas work to serve the adjacent larger served spaces. The bedrooms, for example, have secondary work or office spaces alongside them. A mid-level convertible open space demarcates the original home from the additional floors added.  The roof features cooking and entertaining space plus thrilling views of the city. The rock climbing wall is situated in the rear courtyard and provides a surreal urban sports experience.  Construction took a total of seven years, from May 2012 to January 2020. + Kushner Studios Images via Kushner Studios

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ODA’s vibrant new complex transforms a conventional DC block

September 8, 2021 by  
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West Half by ODA New York is a multi-use complex that combines architecture, interior design and landscape design to promote environmentally-friendly construction and harness a sense of community. Located in Washington, D.C.’s Navy Yard, the 10-story project takes up a full city block and consists of 465 apartments, outdoor terraces and an inner courtyard, among several other amenities. While the top eight levels are strictly residential, the bottom two connect with the community at the street level through restaurants and retail. The building consists of volumes with bright yellow underbellies that playfully cantilever off each other in a horseshoe around a central courtyard. This push and pull effect creates terraces and balconies with views directed north towards the Capitol Building and south to Nationals Park. Since the floors are stacked to maximize the number of terraces and enhance the cascading effect of the pop-outs, the facade tapers in towards the courtyard as it ascends, creating a similar effect to the ballpark stands in the Nationals stadium close by. Related: Green terraces intersect a mixed-use tower in Shenzhen Innovative eco-friendly strategies make an appearance in the terraces and are the grounds for the building’s LEED Gold Certification. Cisterns harvest water to irrigate West Half’s many gardens. Extensive green roof systems cover 50% of the roof and require minimal irrigation and maintenance. Through the built-in planters on the roof and balconies, the facades grow and adapt to the changing seasons. The interior of the mixed-used development carefully considers human scale and experience. A rich material palette, natural light and optimal airflow have all been taken into consideration to make the spaces feel fresh and energetic. A blur between interior and exterior conditions is created through layers of transparency using floor-to-ceiling glazing and glass balustrades. JBG Smith, the developer, expressed that “the main challenge of the project was to develop an innovative approach that would comply with the strict Washington D.C. regulations for privately developed buildings, while creating something iconic for the neighborhood .” Because of the bustling surroundings, ODA and JBG Smith wanted the development to encourage richer, collective experiences for residents, stadium visitors and tourists . “This building is an expression of what the future of urban living can be,” said Eran Chen, founder and chief architect at ODA. + ODA New York Images by Scott Frances

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Designing sustainable habitats at the San Diego Zoo

September 8, 2021 by  
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What’s more amazing, a tiny nectar-drinking  bird  that weighs less than a nickel and can fly backward, or a giant carnivorous lizard that can smell a dying animal up to six miles away? They’re both impressive, and now visitors to the San Diego Zoo can experience both hummingbirds and Komodo dragons in brand new habitats just steps away from each other. The two new  habitats  have been carefully designed, both from an eco-materials standpoint and considering what will make these creatures feel most at home. The hummingbirds can bathe in their choice of three water ponds, each using recycled water, or nest in green walls. Visitor benches are made from recycled plastic lumber. Komodo Kingdom features three distinct environments that wild dragons would enjoy — mountain highland, woodland and beach. The habitat also features heated caves and logs, pools and misters to replicate the hot and steamy environment of their native Indonesia. Related: San Diego Zoo successfully clones an endangered Przewalski’s horse There’s also an area of deep, soft sand for egg-laying. Zookeepers hope that Ratu, the female, and Satu, the male, will like each other enough to make baby lizards. Satu only arrived a few months ago, in time for the opening of Komodo Kingdom in June. The two haven’t met yet, and are currently being kept in separate parts of the enclosure. So what’s it like designing habitats for such diverse creatures as Komodo dragons and hummingbirds? Inhabitat talked to San Diego Zoo  architect  Vanessa Nevers to find out. Inhabitat: How did you go about researching the lifestyle and preferences of Komodo dragons? Nevers: San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance’s Architecture and Planning department worked closely with our  wildlife  care experts to determine not only the needs of the Komodo dragon but also the ways that the habitat design would encourage natural behaviors such as digging, soaking in shallow waters and basking, to name a few. Inhabitat: What factors did you take into consideration when designing Komodo Kingdom from a materials standpoint? Nevers: For the Komodo habitats, getting enough UV  light  into the space is critical, as is maintaining the hot, humid environments that Komodo dragons thrive in. The roof and clerestory at the two indoor habitats consist of an ETFE [Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene, a recyclable plastic that’s 100 times lighter than glass] system that facilitates appropriate levels of UV transmission and climate control. Other factors to take into account for habitat design are soils and plantings that are safe for the Komodo dragons and allow for natural behaviors. Also, the ability to create sheltered areas and pools that are just the right size, heated rocks and elevated areas for basking is very important and is usually executed with shotcrete rockwork. Inhabitat: What are the main features of the hummingbird enclosure? Nevers: Interestingly, the features that make the Hummingbird Habitat great for birds also make it very pleasant for people. The central spatial feature is a semicircular cenote-themed shotcrete structure with fly-through openings and vertical plantings. This structure breaks up the experience into three spaces which also helps define territories for the birds. The flowing ponds and streams, as well as a built-in misting system, add ambiance but also provide ample bird bathing opportunities. And of course, the tropical  plantings  with big broad leaves and the nectar-producing plants are also essential and enjoyable for both birds and people. Inhabitat: How did sustainability affect your choice of building materials? Nevers:  Sustainability  is an important consideration in the selection of all building materials. For example, the ceilings at Komodo Kingdom and Hummingbird Habitat are clad with Accoya wood, and the interior and exterior walls at Hummingbird Habitat are clad with Moso [a type of bamboo]. Both Accoya wood and Moso are Forest Stewardship Council-certified products. The ETFE system, which has been awarded the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD), is used at both Komodo Kingdom and Hummingbird Habitat. It has low levels of embodied energy and can be recycled at the end of its useful life into components used in the manufacture of new ETFE systems. Inhabitat: Did anything surprise you during the process? Nevers: Komodo dragons like it hot, really hot! Their native habitat in the islands of  Indonesia  is usually about 95 degrees Fahrenheit with 70% humidity. This doesn’t sound surprising on paper, but stepping into the indoor habitats in Komodo Kingdom shortly before the dragons moved in was like walking into a sauna. The Komodo dragons love it, but I felt like I was melting! Inhabitat: How does it feel to design habitats for rare and endangered creatures? Nevers: Amazing! Being part of a team that creates habitats that allow these  animals  to thrive is one of the two most rewarding aspects of my work. The other is creating opportunities for people to really appreciate how incredible all life is and the importance of sustaining healthy habitats around the world. Inhabitat: What would you like people to know about the work that you do? Nevers: Zoo architecture is so much more than the design and construction of buildings; it truly is the architecture of experience. From the range of habitat experiences for the animals to the experiences in the guest landscape, these are all part of a larger effort to foster relationships with nature in support of  conservation  for a healthy planet. + San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance Images courtesy of the San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance and Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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Walk to work at this eco-friendly office tower in India

September 1, 2021 by  
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Commuting got you down? New Delhi-based architectural practice Design Forum International (DFI) takes traffic jams out of the morning routine with a plan for a “walk to work” office tower dubbed Amtron. Proposed for development in Bongora’s Tech City in Assam, India, the project blends pedestrian-friendly design with sustainability features. In an attempt to move away from what DFI describes as “the conventional closed work environment,” the design incorporates a landscaped plaza and co-working spaces to foster an open atmosphere. Meanwhile, drop-off and pick-up points at opposite ends of the building prevent traffic jams. This combination of easy movement and an open environment helps the tower achieve DFI’s pedestrian-friendly goal. Related: Live, work and shop at this green building in France Speaking on the inspiration behind this design, a statement from DFI explains, “In accordance with DFI’s ethos of people-first design , [Amtron] is an experience that promotes meaningful interactions and pauses that awes, inspires and stays in the memory of its users.” Sustainability features such as solar panels , rainwater harvesting and green terraces show that this project keeps the environment in mind. In addition to mutual shading and sun-tracking louvers that minimize heat gain and reduce the need for artificial air conditioning, solar-reflective glazing helps regulate temperature while still allowing in natural light. Solar panels on the roof help address the tower’s energy needs. To address water needs, harvested rainwater and recycled wastewater fuel a drip-irrigation system for the landscaping full of native, climate-adaptive vegetation. Green terraces on the facade round out Amtron’s sustainable features and help prevent the heat island effect. ??As for the project’s material palette, DFI wanted to balance the modern and traditional. A reinforced cement concrete (RCC) core supports the tower, while recycled wood panels used for roofing and ceilings help “infuse regional identity.” For the cladding, zinc and aluminum protect the structure from weathering. Amtron’s predicted completion time is 18-21 months after its mid-2021 targeted construction start date. + Design Forum International Images via Design Forum International

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How many trees are needed to offset a city’s carbon emissions?

August 26, 2021 by  
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Trees are nature’s lungs. While we enjoy their beauty, shade and fruits of their existence, they are silently working to clean the air. The natural process of all plants taking in carbon and releasing oxygen not only gives us clean air to breathe but also stores carbon that otherwise contributes to global warming . Countries around the world are in a race to find solutions for these types of greenhouse gases, which are a result of human activities like driving cars and manufacturing goods. While the push for electric vehicles and renewable energy through  solar panels , wind power and hydroelectricity takes the spotlight, another part of the solution equation is growing all around us in the form of trees. Related: Three Americans’ lifetime emissions enough to kill one person The simple fact is, planting trees is an exceptional tool in the fight against climate change. With this in mind,  Compare The Market  has presented its most recent research on the number of trees capital cities around the world would need to plant annually to offset the carbon emissions they contribute to the atmosphere. The study is based on information available through the Global Carbon Atlas Global City Emissions dataset, which measures emissions levels. While major cities work to reverse, slow down and stop the creation of these carbon emissions, what is the estimated number of trees it would take to counterbalance them? Which countries are the highest contributors and which have the lowest  environmental  impact? According to the data, Asia has some work to do. Five of the ten top carbon-emitting capital cities are in Asia. Note that for comparative purposes, the dataset measures transport, industrial,  waste  and local power plants emissions within city boundaries. The report combined data to show the total amount of carbon produced alongside the number of trees it would take to offset it. For example, the five cities in Asia, which include Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Seoul, release a combined 219,506,539 tCO2 annually. The cities would have to plant 43,901,308 trees each year to offset those emissions. Individually, Beijing would need to plant 15,020,976 trees, followed by Singapore with 9,366,336 and Hong Kong with 8,975,292. Tokyo needs a 5,522,200-plant offset and Seoul 5,016,504. Other cities in the top 10 were Istanbul, Lagos, Santiago, London and Mexico City.  An energy spokesperson at Compare The Market comments, “Becoming carbon neutral is an essential goal for countries around the world, and as pledges roll in to reach this target by 2050 and beyond, immediate action is needed. One way we have studied is to offset emissions by planting trees which is great for absorbing CO2, with added benefits of supporting the ecosystem and  wildlife .” The tree offset calculation is based on information sourced from Carbonify.com’s carbon dioxide emissions calculator. The estimates are based on the assumption that five  trees  planted can clean up each ton of carbon dioxide produced.  The study stated, “A tree planted in the humid tropics absorbs on average 50 pounds (22 kg) of carbon dioxide annually over 40 years – each tree will absorb 1 ton of CO2 over its lifetime; but as trees grow, they compete for resources and some may die or be destroyed – not all will achieve their full carbon sequestration potential.” On the other end of the data spectrum are the countries performing better in the battle of low carbon emissions. For these results, a few substitutions were made in the face of missing data. Toronto, Milan and Basel were substituted to include Canada, Italy and Switzerland in the study. Reykjavik, Iceland was the least carbon-emitting capital in the study with total emissions of 346,630 tCO2 per year. The city would still have some work to do, planting 69,326 trees annually to offset its footprint. Of all the cities in the study, Reykjavik was the only one to come in below the 500,000 tCO2-produced mark. Even though nearly 70,000 is still a lot of trees, it was also the only city to have an estimate below 100,000 trees per year to offset carbon emissions. New Zealand took second place for carbon control with annual emissions of 621,179 tCO2. For Wellington to neutralize this, it will have to plant 124,236 trees a year. Basel, Switzerland, had the third-lowest number to plant at 156,786 trees to offset its 783,932 tCO2 footprint. Every other city in the study came in at over 200,000 trees a year. The study provides one tool in an array of options to reduce carbon release. Planting trees alone isn’t a sustainable solution, but neither is focusing solely on renewable energy or  recycling . To achieve goals set by world leaders, it will take a combination of actions across a range of environmental fields.  “The number of trees required may seem very high in cities like Beijing which would need to plant over 15 million trees, but this is if we only used plant power alone. There are many other initiatives and technologies in place, like the government incentives, which present lots of opportunities to offset carbon emissions on a small and large scale,” the spokesman said. + Compare The Market Images via Pixabay

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Live, work and shop at this green building in France

August 12, 2021 by  
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The Partenord Habitat Plot in the Porte de Valenciennes neighborhood in Lille, France , eliminates the idea of a pollution-creating commute to work. In this design, office space, housing and retail areas are all integrated into one. Three sections of the building work together in an integrated design. The offices, headquarters and housing all share the same foundation. The housing section includes 50 units, and there are seven different office spaces. On either side of the headquarters, there are five retail units. The headquarters for Partenord Habitat, the Nord Department Public Housing Office, is a main feature of the space. It sits at the corner of the lot. There is also a car park with 232 underground parking spaces for the housing, office and retail areas. Related: Experimental, ecological home is inspired by a tree in France The building has several distinct architectural features. Terracotta cladding was used for the exterior. Meanwhile, three sides of the building are made with reflective glass, creating a mirror-like shine. As for eco-friendly features, the building is built on them. Graywater will be recovered and stored, solar panels are integrated into the design and digital radiators help create an environment dedicated to optimizing electricity consumption. The heat recovery from the headquarters will provide for 80% of the winter heating needed for the housing units. There’s also a garden built right into the ground on the ground floor. This space also has support facilities, an atrium, a print shop and a bike shed. The triple-height atrium is right at the corner of the crossroads, the entrance to the headquarters. On the ninth floor terrace is the shared vegetable garden. This space faces the center of the design so that it’s protected from the wind. It’s accessible through shared areas. There is also ramp access for those with limited mobility. The 10th-floor terrace houses solar panels. Created by the team at Coldefy, this innovative design won a 2017 competition for Partenord Habitat’s new headquarters. + Coldefy Photography by Julien Lanoo

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New Day School by MMXVI makes use of existing residential building

August 5, 2021 by  
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School districts around the world face the battle of pairing the existing budget with the need to increase usable space for student and teacher use. When the topic inevitably came up for an elementary and middle school in Orpund, Switzerland, the team at MMXVI Architecture was pulled into the discussion. The result is a unique solution that serves a multitude of purposes for the campus and beyond. Known as the New Day School, the building was previously a residential building near the fringe of the school grounds. With the decision to use the aging building, the architects turned their focus on function. The planning team saw the opportunity to not only meet overflow needs of the school but to create a space that was flexible for the public, too. Related: Cranbrook School teaches environmental stewardship   The day school doesn’t require classrooms, so the space is open and flowing as a place where students can eat or meet for clubs or other extracurricular activities. The public can also access the spaces for gatherings, meetings and events. The original foundation from the 1950s wood home was kept to minimize costs, construction time and site impact . As the design took shape, the team said, “It became clear that this concrete structure would be ideal for accommodating ancillary rooms such as the kitchen, sanitary facilities, services, and storage.”  With these secondary spaces accounted for, the main rooms in the building were opened up with a seamless transition between indoors and outdoors. The entire building has direct access to the gardens. A large, curved roof brings a soft connection between the levels and provides passive design elements for cooling and ventilation. Automated louvre windows provide additional cooling at night and bring natural light into the space. Along with a passive earth-air heat exchanger, there is no need for air conditioning, which results in low energy usage. + MMXVI Architecture Via ArchDaily Photography by Oliver Dubuis via MMXVI Architecture

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Ice melt releases ‘forever chemicals’ into Arctic Ocean

August 5, 2021 by  
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A study by Lancaster University has found that seawater close to melting Arctic ice contains high concentrations of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances ( PFAS ). Water samples collected from Arctic ice floes show PFAS levels two times higher than samples from the North Sea. The region under investigation lies far from the most populated areas of Europe, leading to the conclusion that the chemicals were not caused by surface water flow into the ocean. The study, led by the University of Lancaster’s Dr. Jack Garnett and Professor Crispin Halsall, has shown that the chemicals traveled by air and not by sea. Previous studies have shown that PFAS can travel through the air to polar regions, where they get concentrated and accumulate in falling snow. As a result, the Arctic region’s ice sheet has a high concentration of PFAS that are currently being released into the seawater. Related: Greenland’s ice melt enough to cover Florida in water PFAS comprise a large number of chemicals that have many industrial uses. Some of the uses include the manufacture of fluoropolymers like Teflon and water repellants used in food packaging and textile clothing manufacturing. These chemicals are key in many production processes, but they have the downside of being non-degradable. This non-degradability has earned PFAS the title of “forever chemicals.” One group of PFAS, the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), is known to be toxic to humans and animals. They are also the longest-lasting in nature. Being highly mobile chemicals, PFAS can find its way into the food chain easily. They have a protein binding characteristic which makes them dangerous to both humans and wild animals. These chemicals are associated with conditions such as liver damage in mammals and may also lead to kidney problems. The researchers say that the high levels of PFAS being witnessed are due to increased melting over the Arctic. In recent years, the Arctic has been experiencing accelerated rates of ice melt due to global warming. The researchers warn that the continued release of these chemicals may lead to their concentration in seawater. Via Phys Lead image via Pexels

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Sanya Farm Lab honors architecture, culture and agriculture

July 26, 2021 by  
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The new Sanya Farm Lab is a four-story exhibition space that provides 4,000 square meters of space for education, play and innovative ideas. It is located in Nanfan High Tech District of Sanya, the southernmost city on tropical Hainan Island, an area transitioning into a scientific and agricultural research hub. The Sanya Farm Lab reflects the surrounding area, where the government is investing in research around critical issues like environmental changes, land/water scarcity and food production. Related: ZHA designs sustainable expansion to China’s largest international exhibition center The multifunctional research compound and commercial display space features exhibitions covering high-tech advancements like agricultural robotics and indoor vertical farming . The goal of the project is to highlight agricultural advancement, a mission the building design honors by blurring the lines between indoors and outdoors. This is achieved through massive windows that stream natural light into the building as well as indoor landscaping and plants. In a press release, Beijing-based CLOU Architects explained that the structure was developed around platforms, stairs and shade. The focus began by detailing the outdoor public spaces first, with a well-planned cantilever on the second floor, which houses the organic restaurant and bar areas. The cantilevered design creates a rain shelter and passive cooling for the first floor below. Platforms center around the farm-to-table dining space, a theater and a children’s play area. Curved staircases connect the indoor and outdoor spaces in a nod to the curves of nature. The final layer is the deep roof grid structure, made of wood , that reduces sunlight absorption by 70% and improves energy efficiency. Natural ventilation is achieved by the design, too. The grid design pays homage to the traditional house of Hainan Li, embracing the cultural Chinese heritage of the area. Sanya Farm Lab is one of many projects by CLOU Architects. The team’s fingerprints on the project speak to their mission to “strive to realize projects that will positively influence the people involved in its process, the environment , and the communities who live and work there.” + CLOU architects Photography by Shining Laboratory via v2com

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Sanya Farm Lab honors architecture, culture and agriculture

ARCspace’s prefab homes are a quick and sustainable housing solution

July 26, 2021 by  
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The construction industry is responsible for considerable pollution and waste. Builders are leaning into innovative designs and material development to curb the environmental impact through sustainable architecture. ARCspace, a modular building developer, is one such business offering a solution for wasteful traditional construction, while introducing a host of other benefits. ARCspace is a division of Sustainable Building Council Ltd., located in the Los Angeles Cleantech Corridor. As a parent company, the goal of Sustainable Building Council Ltd. is to bring together experts in construction, architectural design, engineering, building, environmentalism and innovative technology who are all invested in addressing housing needs around the world, starting with the crisis in their own backyard, Los Angeles . Related: These prefabricated tiny homes are earthquake- and fire-resistant Prefabricated construction As part of this larger mission, ARCspace partnered with a variety of public and private interests to develop proprietary modular and prefabricated steel building systems. The mission is to work together to create efficient, affordable and long-lasting housing for a variety of needs that range from serving underprivileged communities to providing temporary housing. What began as a pilot program as a potential solution to the extreme homelessness crisis in L.A. has grown into several accommodation options ranging from 160 to 10,000 square feet. These units have been developed for residential and commercial use and as accessory dwelling units (ADUs). The structures are prefabricated for highly efficient and quick builds. The process also minimizes waste . In fact, the company reports the buildings are “spec-built from the ground up in 40-60% less time and cost than traditional construction.” Building materials In alignment with another Sustainable Building Council Ltd. goal to focus on sustainable architecture, ARCspace relies on high-grade steel as its primary material. Steel is a strong choice for durability, so the ARCspace units are built to meet and exceed California seismic safety requirements for protection against earthquake damage. The steel also makes them resilient in high winds and highly fire-resistant. In addition, steel won’t succumb to damage-causing bugs such as termites, and it’s a material that can be reused or recycled . Customizable tiny homes During development, the team at ARCspace collaborated with top innovators in the housing industry in order to follow the guidance of leading GreenTech companies. As a result, ARCspace units come with a variety of options customers can select during the customization process. This includes fun interior design elements like flooring, countertops, fixtures and paint. It also means optional elements that provide off-grid power and water. For example, some homes feature self-contained atmospheric water generators called Hydropanels that are grid-independent and pull a few liters of drinking water out of the air each day. Affordable solar panels are another add-on option. However, the primary supply still comes from onsite plumbing and electrical systems. The finished product provides all the comforts of home and the convenience of upsizing or downsizing with the addition or subtraction of units. Units can be linked end to end or stacked up to four units high with stairways connecting each unit. Avoiding toxins Although they look a bit like shipping containers, ARCspace pointed out critical differences. “We do not utilize or work with any form of used containers, not even 1-trip containers (those only used one time),” the company explained. “Shipping containers are manufactured with materials known to cause cancer such as LED paint, DDT wood flooring, and often have insecticide coatings, etc.” In addition to avoiding toxins in construction, ARCspace puts a focus on smart home features that are energy-efficient and healthy. The company employs a variety of sustainable technologies such as environmentally friendly, vegetable-based spray foam insulation and specialized window coatings that keep excessive heat out while allowing natural light in. It also uses recycled materials throughout, including for decking and outer cladding. Temporary shelters and emergency housing For temporary work sites or emergency housing needs, impermanent foundations mean the units can be relocated with minimal site impact . They can also be set up in as little as 24 hours once onsite with a small team using cranes to stack modules then following up with window installations. The company said, “Last year, ARCspace collaborated with Habitat for Humanity to create an Emergency Shelter Project in the San Francisco Bay area using America’s first prefabricated foundation and worked with local trade schools to help prepare a new workforce with an understanding of emerging sustainable building technology.” This quick-build housing showed the potential for ARCspace to provide affordable housing but also served as inspiration for those considering a career in green design. The ARCspace project was recently selected as a finalist in Fast Company’s 2021 World Changing Ideas Awards, a competition that recognizes “Buildings, landscapes, urban designs, and policies that make cities and living in them cleaner, more efficient, more beautiful, and more equitable for their citizens.” + ARCspace Images via ARCspace

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