Australian facility aims to produce 50,000 metric tons of building material from CO2 by 2020

August 25, 2017 by  
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Mineral Carbonation International wants to transform Carbon dioxide emissions into useful building materials . The Australian firm just unveiled a pilot plant at the Newcastle Institute for Energy and Resources that will attempt to mimic, but speed up, the weathering process by which rainfall produces rocks . MCi launched their technology with a demonstration of their process to transform CO2 into building products. They capture the CO2 from mining company Orica’s Kooragang Island operations. According to The Guardian, CO2 bonds with the rock serpentinite to create solid carbonates in an hour-long process. On their website, MCi says the material could potentially be used for cement , bricks, or plasterboards. Related: Why 2,000-year-old Roman concrete is stronger than our own At the same site at the University of Newcastle , a first-generation batch plant has been operating since 2016, but the university described this new semi-continuous pilot plant as the first of its kind, and said with both plants running MCi will be able to conduct research to hone the process and generate materials for testing. MCi hopes to be generating 20,000 to 50,000 metric tons of the material for use in building by 2020. MCi CEO Marcus Dawe said in a statement, “We need solutions to climate change . We need technology that is ready and tested by the time we have solved the pricing of carbon in our economy. Like the adoption of renewables in energy production, our technology aims to help decarbonize industries like cement, steel, and chemical production.” University of Melbourne geologist Peter Cook said MCi has shown the technology works chemically, but it may not offer a single solution to the large issue of climate change. He told The Guardian, “I think it’s one of these processes where you’ll be able to make money from it in the local area. The difficulty is, for instance we’re getting 36 billion tonnes of CO2 per annum from our use of fossil fuel .” He did say he didn’t want to diminish the great value in MCi’s work. + Mineral Carbonation International Via The Guardian and University of Newcastle Images via Orica and University of Newcastle

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Australian facility aims to produce 50,000 metric tons of building material from CO2 by 2020

Discovery of “Corrosive” Concrete Halts Construction of China’s Tallest Building

March 22, 2013 by  
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Several major construction sites in Shenzhen, one of China’s major financial centers, have been temporarily closed due to reports of the use of cheap, unsafe and corrosive concrete. A public investigation revealed that several developers working in the city have been using concrete made with sea sand instead of river sand, which results in corroding steel reinforcements that can cause buildings to collapse. Among the projects halted is the Kohn Pedersen Fox -designed Ping An Finance Center , which is set to be the tallest building in China and second tallest in the world. The investigation came across evidence that developers in Shenzhen have been using cheaper concrete made from untreated sea sand that contains high levels of steel-damaging salt and chloride. Those corrode steel reinforcements and compromise the stability of entire structures. The Shenzhen Housing and Construction Bureau reported 31 companies for the use of unqualified building materials, eight of which were deprived of the right to work in Shenzhen for a whole year. Work on the Ping An Finance Center, designed by US architectural office Kohn Pedersen Fox , has been halted and the official investigation into the city’s concrete mixing plants has started. The 115-storey super-tall skyscraper was slated for completion by 2015. Via Dezeen Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: building material , China’s tallest building , Chinese architecture , concrete quality , corrosive concrete , Kohn Pedersen Fox , Ping An Finance Center , Shenzhen buildings , Shenzhen construction , unsafe concrete

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Discovery of “Corrosive” Concrete Halts Construction of China’s Tallest Building

‘CO2 Structure’ building material is more powerful than concrete

August 12, 2011 by  
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Nivedita Chauhan: CO2 building material Green Building The building material that mainly constitute our building structures is concrete. But now you a Japanese research team has developed something better than that. It is called the CO2 Structure and is discovery of a Japanese company TIS&Partners. CO2 structure is 2.5 times stronger than concrete and gets dried 30 times faster than that. Concrete can take about 28 days to dry whereas when it comes to CO2 structure it does the same in one day. The main concept behind this is to introduce CO2 to Silicon, which gets converted into a solid material as hard as a brick and that too within seconds. Commercialization of this material could solve many problems related to structure damage during earthquake or any other natural calamity. Using this material in structure development could lessen the chances of any loss due to anything as such and will have a long life. For example the damage that Japan faced due to Tsunami could have been avoided if this kind of material would have been in use. With the help of this material, building structures will become fast and provide us with more powerful outcome than the concrete. CO2 Building Material Green Building Via: Rawstory

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‘CO2 Structure’ building material is more powerful than concrete

Ford to offer solar panels to its electric car buyers

August 12, 2011 by  
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Abdul Vahid V: SunPower Ford EVs with home solar panel option American automobile giant Ford has introduced a ‘Drive Green for Life’ green technology option to avail SunPower’s rooftop solar panels for its new electric car customers. After a federal tax rebate, the 2.5-kilowatt array of solar panels will only cost $10,000 for an electric car owner. The panels can generate up to 3,000 kilowatt-hours of energy a year. The most striking feature of the program is that you can harvest power in daytime and charge the car at night. Needless to say, the program will be a huge advantage for environment, as it will boost people’s curiosity toward alternative energy options. Workers of SunPower will get the solar panels installed for Ford customers. SunPower is a leading manufacturer of high-end solar panels. The company’s solar panels require less space, but provide high efficiency. ‘Drive Green for Life’ solar panels come with specialized Web application or iPhone application, with which customers can monitor the functioning of the panels the company said. In fact, automakers are in competition with several green technology programs. Ford’s major rival General Motors last month announced its plan to establish high-end solar panels at some of its offices in order create awareness among customers about its electric vehicles. Via: Cnet

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Ford to offer solar panels to its electric car buyers

Future smartphones could become self-charging

August 12, 2011 by  
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Balakrishnan Ramachandran: Photovoltaic Polarizers Developed by UCLA As smart phones get loaded with more applications and sharper displays, a phone user is constantly looking for power outlets to recharge his phone. A new development from the UCLA Materials Science department could change that soon. The major user of power in a phone is its display. Some 80-90 per cent of battery drain happens when the phone screen is lit up, which is of course all the time is in use, instead of being in a pocket or a purse. The phone LCD display is made of two sheets of polarized transparent sheets which sandwich the liquid crystal molecules called pixels. When the phone is in use, a back light gets turned on. These were fluorescent lights earlier but are now, largely LED arrays. The pixels in the display get turned on or off by transistors in the microchips in the phone to allow the back light through to the user’s eye. Only a small part of the back light goes through the pixels and over 75 per cent of the light energy gets absorbed in the polarizing sheets. The UCLA team led by Professor Yang Yang has come up with an organic photovoltaic polarizer that would convert the light from the back light into electricity to charge the phone battery. In addition, the polarizer would also absorb light from external sources such as sunlight or even indoor lighting to recharge the phone battery. Professor Yang Yang says that this would be the future for display technology for not just phones but also for tablet computers and other electronic devices. Once this technology gets implemented, the only time the phone battery drains is when it is in the pocket or the purse! Via: Engadget

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Future smartphones could become self-charging

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