OMA unveils designs for zigzagging residential towers in Brooklyn

March 13, 2019 by  
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OMA’s New York office has unveiled striking designs for the Greenpoint Landing mixed-use towers—two dramatically stepped buildings that appear to be two jagged halves of a whole. Designed to frame views of Greenpoint and vistas of Manhattan beyond, the project is “a ziggurat and its inverse…carefully calibrated to one another,” says OMA Partner Jason Long. Greenpoint Landing, which is expected to break ground in August of this year, is located in the Brooklyn waterfront neighborhood of Greenpoint in between Long Island City in the north and Williamsburg in the south. Envisioned as the catalyst for revitalizing Greenpoint’s post-industrial waterfront edge, Greenpoint Landing will expand the public waterfront esplanade and add 2.5 acres of continuous open space along the shoreline as well as 8,600 square feet of ground-floor retail. The complex will include a seven-story building plinth with two towers above that will also bring a total of 745 units of housing, 30 percent of which will be affordable. “Like two dancers, the towers simultaneously lean into and away from one another,” the architecture firm says of the project’s eye-catching design. “The taller tower widens toward the east as it rises, maximizing views and creating a dramatic face to the neighborhood and beyond. Its partner steps back from the waterfront to create a series of large terraces, widening toward the ground and the new waterfront park to the North. A ziggurat and its inverse, the pair are intimately linked by the void between them.” Related: Amsterdam is transforming a prison into a green energy-generating neighborhood To further connect the building with its surroundings, the architects will add two levels of waterfront-facing green space and terraces framed with common spaces and amenities. The facade will be lined with large windows and precast concrete panels with carved angled faces that react dynamically to the sun’s path throughout the day. A bridge housing pool and fitness programs will link the two towers together and provide panoramic views of the waterfront and Manhattan skyline. + OMA Images via OMA

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OMA unveils designs for zigzagging residential towers in Brooklyn

The Wally Shop is bringing zero-waste grocery delivery to Brooklyn

January 28, 2019 by  
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Zero-waste grocery delivery has made its way to Brooklyn. The Wally Shop is attempting to change the grocery game by delivering local, organic produce from farmers markets and bulk stores to customers. The food is placed in packaging that the company later picks up and reuses. The new delivery service wants to help with the global waste problem and reduce addiction to single-use plastic by making sustainable grocery shopping more convenient. The idea came from Wally Shop founder and CEO Tamara Lim after she noticed how much unnecessary packaging was used every day when she managed the packaging and shipping department at Amazon. Related: Precycle, a zero-waste grocery store, opens in Brooklyn “I want to help break down the boundaries that come with being a sustainable consumer — having a delivery service that brings you local , fresh produce in reusable packaging allows shoppers to make better choices without sacrificing time or convenience,” Lim said. “The reusable packaging supports a shift toward a circular economy, where there is no waste involved.” The Wally Shop is currently offering produce delivery, but in the coming weeks, it plans to expand to other product categories like meats , seafood, grains and herbs. The company is also committed to transparency with product sourcing by providing their customers with that information on their receipts. Lim said it is important to provide customers with locally sourced ingredients that have a low carbon footprint and are package-free. She added that this is the healthiest option for customers as well as the environment. When customers place their orders, The Wally Shop selects the produce and delivers them the same day. This means that the produce goes from farm to table in just hours. Couriers deliver all orders in reusable packaging that they pick up during a future delivery. This method creates a zero-waste “closed-loop system” that prevents packaging and shipping containers from ending up in a landfill. Currently, The Wally Shop is operating in select neighborhoods in Brooklyn , but it hopes to expand into other areas in New York City as well as cities like San Francisco and Boston. + The Wally Shop Image via Shutterstock

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The Wally Shop is bringing zero-waste grocery delivery to Brooklyn

Maven Moment: Winters in Brooklyn — Savor the Season

January 23, 2019 by  
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I have vivid memories of winters as a child in … The post Maven Moment: Winters in Brooklyn — Savor the Season appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Maven Moment: Winters in Brooklyn — Savor the Season

Recycling Mystery: Compostable Plastics

January 23, 2019 by  
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After finishing off your morning coffee, you stop by the … The post Recycling Mystery: Compostable Plastics appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Recycling Mystery: Compostable Plastics

Moving the needle: toward a more holistic and ethical fashion industry

October 19, 2018 by  
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A Q&A with Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator founder, Debera Johnson, on accelerating sustainable and digital technology in apparel production.

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Moving the needle: toward a more holistic and ethical fashion industry

3 takeaways from Google’s search for ‘carbon-free’ energy

October 19, 2018 by  
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There’s incidentally some irony in corporate renewable energy procurement.

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3 takeaways from Google’s search for ‘carbon-free’ energy

Organic farming with gene editing: an oxymoron or a tool for sustainable agriculture?

October 19, 2018 by  
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Many farmers cultivating organic crops believe that genetically modified crops pose threats to human health. It’s not that simple.

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Organic farming with gene editing: an oxymoron or a tool for sustainable agriculture?

Old Victorian home in Brooklyn gets incredible Passive House retrofit

August 1, 2018 by  
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Retrofitting an old house into a Passive House is a challenging feat to say the least, but when done right, it can be amazing. When Bo and Itzy decided to turn their old Victorian home in Brooklyn into a passive home, they took on the ambitious project with help from NYC-based firm  ZH Architects . The result is  powerhouse of energy-efficiency, redesigned and revamped for healthy living. Although the number of new passive home projects continues to grow, retrofitting old structures to fit Passive House requirements is still a massive undertaking rife with complications. In an interview with the architects, Bo explained that one of the biggest hurdles of their home renovation was making the space airtight. Related: The United States’ first Passive Plus House generates nearly all the energy it needs “Most passive houses have been either newly built or brownstone/townhouse conversions,” Bo said. “It’s a lot easier to get this right when dealing with a rectangular box or only two exposed walls with a flat roof. With an old Victorian home like ours, there are nooks and crannies everywhere. The hardest part is really getting the house airtight, so you need to work both from the inside and the out taking great care that you don’t have any air infiltration or gaps. We used an Intello vapor barrier on the inside of the attic and a Zip System on the exterior.” The home currently has an air tightness of about 0.29 ACH (air changes per hour) which, according to the architects, is a world record for a retro-fit building. Insulation was a big factor in creating an energy-efficient living space. The architects wrapped the home in extra layers of thick, eco-friendly insulation and installed high-performance windows to create a sealed envelope. Despite New York’s bitterly cold winters and severe summer heat, the interior will sustain a comfortable temperature throughout the year. To complement this level of comfort, the interior design is light and airy, with white walls and hardwood flooring to create an inviting space. For Bo and Itzy, having a passive home was not only about monetary and energy savings , but also to focus on creating a healthy living atmosphere. Along with the home’s many efficient features, the renovation avoided all VOC paints and harmful chemicals. Instead of using polyurethane for the flooring, they went with a natural Scandinavian lye treatment which includes using a natural mixture of oil and soap. The home was also installed with Energy Star-rated appliances, solar roof tiles  and LED lighting . Of course, the process did mean making quite a few tough decisions about the home’s original features. For Itzy, the idea of getting rid of the large chimney was daunting, but by doing so, they were able to create an extra room in the attic. As another perk, they were able to install a wine cellar in the basement that uses an innovative concept for cooling. The heat pump water heater in the basement, which draws in warm air and blows out cool air, was redesigned to blow that cooler air into the wine cellar to keep the bottles cool. With this Passive House project complete, the residents and the architects hope to inspire others to take the time to retrofit old buildings for energy efficiency. + ZH Architects Images via ZH Architects

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Old Victorian home in Brooklyn gets incredible Passive House retrofit

Big corporate and civic fleet buyers push for more EV choices

July 12, 2018 by  
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An airy, brick-walled space, next to a Formula E race track, set the scene for a campaign kickoff Tuesday in Brooklyn, New York, intended to promote zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) as a way to fight climate change at a time when the federal government wants to relax rules to limit tailpipe emissions.

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Big corporate and civic fleet buyers push for more EV choices

Giant "Lily Pads" will capture stormwater at Brooklyn’s largest public-housing complex

March 29, 2017 by  
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When Hurricane Sandy made landfall in October 2012, the Brooklyn neighborhood of Red Hook didn’t stand a chance. Surrounded by the waters of the  Gowanus Canal , Upper New York Bay, and Buttermilk Channel, the coastal community was ripped apart by the tidal surge. More than four years on, Red Hook is slowly but surely returning to form. New development is under way, and Red Hook Houses , Brooklyn’s largest public housing complex, is getting a new, more resilient makeover complete with giant, green-roofed “Lily Pads” that will capture stormwater and keep it from overflowing the city’s sewage system. To help it weather the brunt of Mother Nature’s wrath, if and when she decided to call again, the New York City Housing Authority commissioned Kohn Pedersen Fox and landscape architecture firm OLIN to devise a “resiliency and renewal program.” Related: New renderings reveal resilient and revitalizing Red Hook waterfront creative complex After extensive research, including community surveys and workshops, KPF is proposing to build 14 “utility pods”—all above ground—to not only deliver heat and electricity to each of the 28 buildings but also to provide a space where residents can convene. There will also be a “Lily Pad” scheme: permanent flood barriers in the form of raised earth in the middle of internal courtyards. For extra security, Red Hook Houses will get an active flood wall bolstered with passive barriers. “These elements transform the experience of residents and guests by providing vibrant, social spaces in conjunction with the area’s infrastructural needs,” KPF wrote in a press release . Related: Red Hook Housing Project’s new urban farm grows fresh produce and jobs for the community And KPF and OLIN’s efforts haven’t gone unnoticed. The New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects has named NYCHA Red Hook Houses one of its 2017 Design Awards winners . You’ll be able to view the project, and the other winning designs, at an exhibition at the Center for Architecture in Manhattan from April 21 through June 20. + Kohn Pedersen Fox Via the Architect’s Newspaper

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Giant "Lily Pads" will capture stormwater at Brooklyn’s largest public-housing complex

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