Snhetta unveils striking new skyscraper for Manhattans Upper West Side

November 29, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Snhetta unveils striking new skyscraper for Manhattans Upper West Side

Snøhetta has unveiled a handsome skyscraper for Manhattan’s prestigious Upper West Side at 50 West 66th Street. Undeniably modern yet sensitive to its historic context, the striking mixed-use tower will soar to a height of 775 feet with 125 residential units. The chamfered form, cut into an angular shape, is “evocative of the chiseled stone of Manhattan’s geologic legacy,” say the architects. Snøhetta’s skyscraper comprises luxury residences stacked on top a mixed-use podium. The residential entrance will be located on 65th Street, while the entrance to a synagogue will be located on 66th. A large terrace is placed atop the podium on the 16th floor, where the building’s residential slab is set back from the multilevel outdoor plaza. The lushly planted terrace will offer views of the Hudson River, Central Park, and the city. Related: Times Square now has double the public space The architects carved away the skyscraper to create a dynamic form with a chiseled crown. Handset and textured limestone , bronze, and glass clad the building. Construction is slated to begin in Spring 2018. + Snøhetta Via ArchDaily Images by Snøhetta and Binyan Studios

See the original post here: 
Snhetta unveils striking new skyscraper for Manhattans Upper West Side

Newly discovered Kazakhstan pyramid may be older than certain Egyptian pyramids

August 16, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Newly discovered Kazakhstan pyramid may be older than certain Egyptian pyramids

Archaeologists in Kazakhstan have made a discovery that could change history as we know it. They’ve found a pyramid they think could be even older than certain Egyptian pyramids . Archaeologist Viktor Novozhenov described the find as a ” sensational discovery .” Novozhenov says the pyramid, or mausoleum, located in the Sary-Arka steppes is similar to pyramids built nearby by the ancient Begazy-Dandybai culture around the 12th to 8th centuries BC. But he says the newly found pyramid could be even older than those, and may have been built during the Bronze Age . Related: Secret tunnel sealed 1,800 years ago offers clues to mysterious ancient city in Mexico He says the Kazakhstan pyramid is similar to the Pyramid of Djoser, built for Pharaoh Djoser in Egypt sometime between 2,700 BC and 2,601 BC. Both pyramids are “step pyramids,” which Yahoo! News says are the “world’s oldest man-made cut stone structures.” In a Facebook post , Novozhenov describes the new pyramid as a “magnificent funerary structure.” He is part of a group of archaeologists from Karagandy State University working under I.A. Kukushkina, according to his Facebook post. Novozhenov told Yahoo! News the group was going to “look inside the mausoleum this week.” He said any artifacts found would be given to the Karaganda Archaeological Museum. At this point there’s no firm date for the new Kazakhstan pyramid, but hopefully the archaeologists will be able to determine more information when they look inside. Via Yahoo! News Images via Viktor Novozhenov on Facebook and Dmitry Volodin on Facebook

Excerpt from:
Newly discovered Kazakhstan pyramid may be older than certain Egyptian pyramids

Naturally-cooled Toronto home boasts a beautiful multi-level indoor garden

August 16, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Naturally-cooled Toronto home boasts a beautiful multi-level indoor garden

The house, designed as an infill residential project, occupies a corner lot in Toronto’s North York neighborhood. It seems to grow upwards with the development of the indoor garden that starts at the basement level. Strategically placed narrow windows protect the residents from outside views, while harvesting natural light throughout the day. By placing spaces that require a high level of privacy on the street level, and defining the courtyard on the lower level, the architects created a structure that protects its inhabitants from the city noise. Related: Gorgeous Green House is Wrapped in a Lush Vertical Garden in Belgium The house boosts several passive sustainable features. The architects ensured that the interior gets enough natural light, while retaining a sense of privacy. Any excessive heat is avoided by offsetting the large skylight on the top floor with a combination of openings that facilitate natural ventilation . + Alva Roy Architects Via v2com Photos by Tom Arban and Navid Aali

More:
Naturally-cooled Toronto home boasts a beautiful multi-level indoor garden

New NASA data confirms July 2016 was the hottest month on record

August 16, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New NASA data confirms July 2016 was the hottest month on record

Newly released data from NASA indicates July was the hottest month on record , since scientists began tracking global temperatures in 1880. This July was 1.51 degrees Fahrenheit (0.84 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 1950-1980 global average, and a fraction of a degree hotter than the two months tied for the previous “hottest month ever” record. The conflux of climate change related to human activity and the warming effects of El Niño contributed to this summer’s soaring temperatures, and climate experts expect to see more record high temps in the future. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JK7NV2YheGk If it seems as though there have been a lot of record-breaking high temps lately, it’s because there have. July was the 10th consecutive record hot month in a row, according to NASA . The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hasn’t yet released its temperature calculations for July, but they are expected on Wednesday of this week. NOAA uses slightly different calculations, compared to NASA, so its conclusions may not match up. (For example, NOAA’s figures count 14 consecutive monthly heat records before July, compared to NASA’s 10.) Related: February’s record high temperatures are bringing us too close to 2°C limit Despite this year’s El Niño season loosening its grip on the weather, global temperatures continue to rise. NASA looks to a number of factors when calculating its global temperatures, including surface temperatures and the extent of Arctic sea ice. Over the first six months of 2016, NASA reports temperatures were the highest average of any six-month period since record keeping began. Via Phys.org Images via Swen George/Flickr

Go here to read the rest: 
New NASA data confirms July 2016 was the hottest month on record

Archaeologists reveal fresh details about 4,500-year-old "New Stonehenge"

August 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Archaeologists reveal fresh details about 4,500-year-old "New Stonehenge"

Last year archaeologists thrilled the world when they revealed there could be a “New Stonehenge ” just two miles away from the iconic monument in England . Geophysical surveys suggested this 4,500-year-old “Superhenge” could include around 100 concealed stones. Now archaeologists digging at Durrington Walls, where “New Stonehenge” is located, have found the monument was likely built mainly with wooden posts instead, and work was mysteriously stopped before completion. The Durrington Walls monument could have been a ring around 1,640 feet in diameter of between 200 and 300 wooden posts. The archaeologists on the “Durrington Dig” excavated two large holes about five feet deep. Ancient people appear to have removed the posts and then filled the holes with chalk, and archaeologists found an ancient tool made of the shoulder blade of a cow at the bottom of one hole, suggesting there could have been a ritual surrounding the process of filling in the holes. Related: Enormous ritual stone monument discovered near Stonehenge is “archaeology on steroids” Archaeologists think the fact that monument construction was abruptly halted when the structure was almost done could offer clues into the religious and political climate of the era, as the Neolithic era slowly transitioned to the Bronze Age. The people building Durrington Walls may have changed religions, or perhaps another group came through and destroyed evidence of their religion. The abrupt change signals religious or political turmoil may have gripped the region. National Trust archaeologist Nick Snashall said , “The new discoveries at Durrington Walls reveal the previously unuspected complexity of events in the area during the period when Stonehenge’s largest stones were being erected – and show just how politically and ideologically dynamic British society was at that particularly crucial stage in prehistory.” Further evidence for the turmoil can be glimpsed in Stonehenge’s own history, as Snashall said. At around the same time as the Durrington Walls work ceased, Stonehenge was changed from a large circle with stones of medium size to a smaller circle with the humongous stones glimpsed at the site today. Via The Independent Images via Wikimedia Commons and Dr Nick Snashall on Twitter

Read the original post: 
Archaeologists reveal fresh details about 4,500-year-old "New Stonehenge"

Apple Headquarters is finally complete and it’s an adorable treehouse

August 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Apple Headquarters is finally complete and it’s an adorable treehouse

The treehouse sits in a garden in Limhamn, Sweden. It was built using two large plywood sheets “jigsawed into an interlocking apple shape,” and then clad with poly-carbonate sheets to fortify the treetop headquarters. According to the architect, “The interior of this stake-out is a bench, some thin plywood shelves for books and a periscope hidden inside a rotating apple twig to spy on the surrounding villa gardens.” Related: Anders Berensson unveils wooden Trätoppen skyscraper with a numerical facade Anders Berensson Architects are no strangers to creative, organic spaces. They’ve also created innovative designs like the Haystack Cafe, the mind-bending  Chop Stick swing set and the idyllic Guest Harbor House . We’d happily swap out our smartphone for a chance to play in this Apple Headquarters. + Anders Berensson Architects

Here is the original: 
Apple Headquarters is finally complete and it’s an adorable treehouse

Extraordinary ‘British Pompeii’ settlement was preserved in water for 3,000 years

July 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Extraordinary ‘British Pompeii’ settlement was preserved in water for 3,000 years

The Cambridge Archaeological Unit is excavating Must Farm , a well-preserved British site that has provided a glimpse into daily life during the Bronze Age. Described as ‘ British Pompeii ,’ Must Farm was destroyed quickly and its buildings sank into water, where the settlement was preserved for the next 3,000 years or so. Now archaeologists are finding everything from textiles to food to a wheel, and describe the site as home to ” an extraordinarily rich range of good and objects .” The excavation at Must Farm is funded by Forterra and Historic England and supported by the University of Cambridge . Like Pompeii, the story of the Must Farm inhabitants ends in tragedy. Because the site is so well-preserved, archaeologists have many clues to piece together what likely happened. Related: UK resident accidentally discovers ancient Anglo-Saxon settlement The Must Farm locals built round homes on stilts above a river. There were about 10 of these wooden homes, and about 30 people lived there. Archaeologists can tell that the oak trees utilized in the homes were cut down in the winter, and the next summer, the entire settlement burned down rapidly in an inferno. Forensic research appears to indicate the fire may have been set on purpose before the residents were able to truly establish their settlement. The remains of the houses and the possessions that fell into the river and river silt were preserved in the fens. It appears any survivors may have had to flee given how many possessions were left behind. Archaeologists have found axes, spears, 60 beads (that could have come from Turkey or Syria), linen fragments, and even footprints. There were no skeletons other than a skull that had likely been hung as a trophy on one of the homes. Site manager Mark Knight told CNN, “I think I’ve found a landscape that has a story; a landscape that hasn’t been described before, hasn’t been visited before. We are the first people to explore it.” Via CNN Images via Must Farm Archaeology Facebook

Read the rest here: 
Extraordinary ‘British Pompeii’ settlement was preserved in water for 3,000 years

Ice That Doesn’t Melt: Ice Cast Bronze Collection by Steven Haulenbeek

July 9, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ice That Doesn’t Melt: Ice Cast Bronze Collection by Steven Haulenbeek

During the Polar Vortex that hit Chicago this past winter it wasn’t uncommon to see Youtube videos of water freezing in mid-air and other fun science experiments. However, designer Steven Haulenbeek used the arctic temperature to his advantage and created an entire collection of objects and even furniture in his own backyard. Haulenbeek’s Ice Cast Bronze Collection captures the random yet lush texture of melted ice. Read the rest of Ice That Doesn’t Melt: Ice Cast Bronze Collection by Steven Haulenbeek Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , “sustainable furniture” , bronze , green design , green interiors , green products , ice cast , Ice Cast Bronze , ice furniture , natural design , Steven Haulenbeek , sustainable design , Sustainable Interiors , sustainable products

More:
Ice That Doesn’t Melt: Ice Cast Bronze Collection by Steven Haulenbeek

Bad Behavior has blocked 5180 access attempts in the last 7 days.