100-million-year-old dinosaur remains discovered in Canada look ‘weeks old’

May 15, 2017 by  
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A group of miners in Canada accidentally stumbled upon what is possibly the most intact dinosaur carcass science has ever seen. They discovered the fully-preserved nodosaur, a herbivore that stretched 18-feet-long and weighed nearly 3,000 pounds, in 2011 while working on a project 17 miles north of Alberta, Canada . Even though the dinosaur died over 110 million years ago, scientists say because they were preserved in just the right conditions, the remains appear to be only a few weeks old. The unexpected discovery was primarily made by heavy equipment operator Shawn Funk, who was carving through the Earth in Millennium Mine when his excavator contacted something hard. What looked like walnut brown rocks turned out to be the fossilized remains of an 110-million-years-old nodosaur. The imposing herbivore was intact enough for the front half (from the snout to the hips) to be recovered. To date, the specimen is the best fossil of a nodosaur ever found. According to Michael Greshko of National Geographic , the petrified dinosaur is a wonder to behold. “Fossilized remnants of skin still cover the bumpy armor plates dotting the animal’s skull. Its right forefoot lies by its side, its five digits splayed upward. I can count the scales on its sole,” writes Greshko. Related: World’s largest dinosaur footprint found in Australia’s “Jurassic Park” The dinosaur appears similarly to how it would have millions of years ago because of a rapid undersea burial. The fact that its tissue did not decompose but was instead fossilized is extremely rare, according to paleontologists. Said Paleobiologist Jakob Vinther, an expert on animal coloration from the U.K.’s University of Bristol, the dinosaur is so well-preserved it “might have been walking around a couple of weeks ago. I’ve never seen anything like this.” When the nodosaur was alive, it didn’t have shin-splitting till clubs like its cousin, the Ankylosauridae. Instead, it wielded thorny armor to deter predators. Alive during the Cretaceous period, the 18-foot-long dinosaur could have been considered the rhinoceros of its day. In other words, it was a grumpy herbivore that kept to itself. Rarely would it be messed with, as it had two 20-inch-long spikes jutting out of its shoulders. Head over to National Geographic for more images! . Via National Geographic Images via Don’tMessWithWildDinosaurs , TwoFeed

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100-million-year-old dinosaur remains discovered in Canada look ‘weeks old’

Keynsham Civic Center and One Stop Shop brings public space back to Bristolians

July 22, 2016 by  
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The complex occupies a large sloping site located within the town center, and makes it accessible to pedestrians . In addition to office spaces and civic facilities, the complex includes 20,000 square feet of retail spaces on the ground floor. Related: Prefabricated Southend Pier Cultural Centre Sits At the End of the World’s Longest Pleasure Pier “We responded to the challenge of the constrained and sloping town centre site by slicing through it to create two new pedestrian retail streets and a cluster of inter-locking buildings,” said the architects. “This allowed over 50% of the site to be given over to new retail focused public realm and better integrated the development into the existing urban grain.” Related: Atelier CMJN Unveils Plans for Sustainable Great Fen Visiting Center in the UK In addition to its communal and civic values, the project is marked by several sustainable features such as power-saving mechanisms, efficient lighting systems, high thermal mass, and excellent acoustic performance . The project, which won the 2015 RIBA South West Sustainability Award, is the first in the country to target a Display Energy Certificate (DEC). + AHR Architects Via Architecture Photos by Daniel Hopkinson

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Keynsham Civic Center and One Stop Shop brings public space back to Bristolians

These life-sized willow whales swim through a sea of plastic bottles to raise pollution awareness

July 16, 2015 by  
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A sculpture of two life-sized whales, made from Somerset willow and 70,000 upcycled plastic bottles, has been unveiled in Bristol to mark the city’s status as the UK’s first European Green Capital . Weighing six tons, The Bristol Whales will be situated in Bristol’s Millennium Square from July 17 to September 1. The artwork depicts a blue whale and humpback whale swimming through an ‘ocean’ of plastic bottles, and represents the fragility of our oceans and the increasing threat of plastic pollution. Visitors can add their own pledge message in a virtual bottle using The Bristol Whales app, which will then be displayed on a big screen above the whales. The Bristol Whales has been designed and built by Cod Steaks , initiated by Arts Project Earth and funded by Arts Council England as part of Bristol’s year as European Green Capital. + The Bristol Whales  The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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These life-sized willow whales swim through a sea of plastic bottles to raise pollution awareness

Super-efficient straw-bale houses hit the market in the UK—piglets need not apply

February 9, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Super-efficient straw-bale houses hit the market in the UK—piglets need not apply Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , bristol , energy costs , energy saving , Green Building , insulation , low carbon , ModCell , Straw Bale , straw houses , Sustainable Building , UK , university of bath

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Super-efficient straw-bale houses hit the market in the UK—piglets need not apply

Flourishing urban garden sprouts in San Francisco churchyard

February 9, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Flourishing urban garden sprouts in San Francisco churchyard Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: community garden , local food , San Francisco , San Francisco churchyard , San Francisco community garden , Sustainable , urban agriculture , urban garden , Western Addition

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Flourishing urban garden sprouts in San Francisco churchyard

Victory: Obama just banned drilling in Alaska’s Bristol Bay

December 18, 2014 by  
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On Tuesday, Barack Obama passed a ban on drilling  Alaska’s Bristol Bay , dubbing it “one of America’s greatest natural resources…  a beautiful natural wonder and… something that is too precious to just put out to the highest bidder.” The ban makes the bay permanently off-limits to oil and gas drilling. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Related: Melting Arctic Ice Causes 35,000 Walruses to Mass on Alaskan Beach, Raising Fears of Stampede Read the rest of Victory: Obama just banned drilling in Alaska’s Bristol Bay Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alaska , barack obama , Bristol Bay Alaska , drilling , drilling ban , epa , wild sockeye salmon

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Victory: Obama just banned drilling in Alaska’s Bristol Bay

3D Printed Mechanical Muscle Has a Heartbeat Powered by Yeast

February 21, 2013 by  
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If the Tin Man were looking for a modern heart instead of an oversized pocket watch, it might look a little something like this. Scientists at the University of West England in Bristol have fabricated a 3D-printed pump that that uses the pressure generated by live yeast to beat, turning it into an artificial muscle. The valve is powered by electricity generated by a microbial fuel cell and controls the movement of the membrane. It opens to release pressure generated by the yeast, expands, and then shrinks back to begin another cycle. Read the rest of 3D Printed Mechanical Muscle Has a Heartbeat Powered by Yeast Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed , artifical muscle , beat , bristol , cyborg , ecobot , gas , heart , membrane , microbial fuel cell , pacemaker , peter walters , pump , tin man , university of west england , valve , yeast

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3D Printed Mechanical Muscle Has a Heartbeat Powered by Yeast

Green-Roofed Casa Cabeço Rises From the Hills Like a Giant Pumpkin Patch in Portugal

February 21, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Green-Roofed Casa Cabeço Rises From the Hills Like a Giant Pumpkin Patch in Portugal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Casa Cabeço , Daylighting , green design , green roof , insulation , madeira , MSB Arquitectos , natural light , north-facing home , orange house , portugal , pumpkin patch , stormwater run-off , sustainable design

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Green-Roofed Casa Cabeço Rises From the Hills Like a Giant Pumpkin Patch in Portugal

Study: Global Sea Levels Could Rise 3 Feet By 2100

January 8, 2013 by  
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Although scientists have been aware that the polar ice sheets are melting faster than previously expected , the consequential rise in sea levels may be much higher than anyone predicted. A new calculation based on what is known as expert elicitation published in Nature Climate Change shows that ocean levels might climb over 3 feet in the next 90 years. Read the rest of Study: Global Sea Levels Could Rise 3 Feet By 2100 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Bristol climate study , climate change impact , ICPP ocean levels , Ocean levels , rising sea , sea levels rising

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Study: Global Sea Levels Could Rise 3 Feet By 2100

British Mission to Drill Down to Subglacial Lake Ellsworth in the Antarctic is Derailed

December 28, 2012 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock It appears that the formidable ice sheets of the Antarctic have gotten the best of a UK research team attempting to bore through them to reach the subglacial Lake Ellsworth . The $3 million project to drill through 1.8 miles of ice to get to the lake was funded by the National Environment Research Council which comprises of the British Antarctic Survey , the National Oceonography Centre , and nine UK universities. The field team, led by principal investigator Michael Siegert of the University of Bristol, had to stop drilling after running into an unexpected glitch and the team was forced to call off the project for the season. Read the rest of British Mission to Drill Down to Subglacial Lake Ellsworth in the Antarctic is Derailed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2 boreholes and a cavity to connect them , british antractic survey , drilling through 1.8 miles of ice , Lake Ellsworth , lake ellsworth project called off , michael seigert , national environment research council , national oceoography centre , subglacial lakes in the antractic , uk research team drilling towards lake ellsworth , university of bristol

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British Mission to Drill Down to Subglacial Lake Ellsworth in the Antarctic is Derailed

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