A modern farmhouse in South Africa blends style with sustainability

September 6, 2018 by  
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Strey Architects is bringing a contemporary style to the countryside with its recent project, Link House. The home, which features a plethora of sustainable design elements, showcases simple living at its finest by meshing luxury and minimalism . Features ranging from design for natural ventilation to solar heating and rainwater collection tanks meld seamlessly into the gorgeous modern farmhouse. In designing Link House, Strey Architects was tasked with building a farmhouse that was both aesthetically attractive and humble. The result is a beautiful countryside home that features three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a formal dining room, a lounge, a pool and a large playroom — all in a sustainable design . The house, which takes on a U-shape, also includes a large deck out front, an open kitchen and a garden. According to the architects, the house was designed with two wings and positioned to take advantage of the seasons. During the hotter months, the west wing blocks the sun and acts as a privacy screen. When winter comes, the northern and southern wings allow more sunlight inside the house for optimal heating conditions. The house also features fold-away doors and top-notch ventilation, which eliminates the need for a traditional HVAC system. Even the building blocks for the Link House were made from sustainable materials. The foundation is built from recycled plastic and is designed to air out dangerous radon gas. The walls and ceilings feature board insulation to properly protect the outer brick siding. Inside, the floors are crafted from recycled teak parquet. The stunning modern farmhouse wouldn’t be complete without a rainwater catchment system and solar water heating throughout the residence, making it completely sustainable throughout the year. Although the Link House is sustainable, Strey Architects did not sacrifice anything on design and aesthetics. The end result is a home that will fit in just about any location and fully comply with building regulations while remaining stylish and green . + Strey Architects Via ArchDaily Images via Dook / Strey Architects

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A modern farmhouse in South Africa blends style with sustainability

Artist revamps dingy interior of a 1962 Airstream with vibrant florals

September 6, 2018 by  
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While most Airstream renovations tend to go for a minimalist aesthetic to create the illusion of more space, surface pattern designer  Bonnie Christine used her love of florals to convert her 1962 Airstream trailer into a gorgeous home on wheels. To transform the formerly drab interior, Bonnie lined various accent walls in wallpaper with a forest green background and light pink flowers to add a fresh and vibrant flair to the incredibly compact 150-square-foot tiny home. Bonnie and her husband bought the 1962 Airstream Overlander in order to take their family of four on the road. However, the interior was in dire need of a makeover before they could set out on their travels. To completely revamp the living space , the talented surface pattern and fabric designer used her artistic skills to create a fresh new aesthetic. Related: Couple restores an old Airstream into a chic tiny home on wheels Renamed “Marjorie” after the original owner, the project is an example of an Airstream renovation done right. Bonnie began Marjorie’s makeover in the kitchen, where she stained and rebuilt the cabinets before painting them in a soothing green tone. Using this earthy moss color as a starting point, the space then needed a little extra vibrancy, which came in the form of the “Pimpernel” wallpaper by William Morris. Bonnie says that although the floral wallpaper was a bold decision, it was also an easy one. “As a surface pattern designer, I also wanted to give a nod to the father of surface design himself by using a William Morris wallpaper,” Bonnie explained in an interview with Design*Sponge . “I find it endlessly inspiring!” The rest of the tiny home is equally as inspiring, with a fresh decor that brightens up every corner of the compact living space. A small dinette set was kept in neutral colors to contrast the floral wallpaper, and the kitchen uses shelving and storage to avoid clutter. Even the home’s itsy-bitsy bathroom gives off a spa-like feel. To complete the ethereal atmosphere, the entire living space is flooded with natural light . The family has clocked several thousand miles since the renovation, traveling from North Carolina to the Grand Canyon in their shiny Airstream, with many stops in between. Bonnie explained that traveling in a tiny home has opened up a world of adventure for the family. “I am most thankful for what this tiny home represents — the ability for our family to be completely mobile,” Bonnie said. “We can go for a small weekend trip, or set out on a cross-country adventure with our home right along with us. There’s nothing more grand than seeing the wonders of nature and the great outdoors through our children’s eyes!” + Bonnie Christine Via Design*Sponge Photography by Bonnie Christine

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Artist revamps dingy interior of a 1962 Airstream with vibrant florals

Abandoned NYC warehouse is reinvented as LEED Gold-certified apartments

June 21, 2018 by  
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A new apartment complex infused with nature has taken root in New York City’s concrete jungle. Local design firm COOKFOX Architects completed 150 Charles Street, a residence that takes over the abandoned Whitehall warehouse on the Hudson River waterfront. Designed to blend in with the existing urban fabric, the modern building also boasts a low environmental footprint and LEED Gold certification. Located in the West Village, 150 Charles Street offers 91 residential units — including 10 individual three-story townhouses — on an approximately one-acre lot. Built to incorporate a pre-1960 warehouse , the building preserves the warehouse streetwall and the original material palette of concrete, brick and glass. Greenery is embedded throughout the building from the lush central courtyard to the cascading planted terraces and green rooftops that overlook waterfront views for a total of 30,000 square feet of landscaped space. Dirtworks, PC led 150 Charles Street’s landscape design. “Incorporating ideas of biophilia  — our inherent connection to the environment — access to nature throughout the building is related to themes of prospect (wide, open views) and refuge (safe and protected interior spaces),” COOKFOX Architects wrote. “150 Charles combines the best of the West Village townhouse garden view and the waterfront high-rise river view with cascading terraces designed as a ‘fifth façade.’” Related: Sneak a peek inside Pacific Park’s first greenery-enveloped residences in COOKFOX’s new video In addition to abundant greenery that features native and adaptive species, the apartment complex earned its LEED Gold certification with a variety of energy-efficient and resource-saving features. The team reduced construction waste and used locally sourced, recyclable and recycled building materials. The building is wrapped in a highly insulated envelope and fitted with smart building systems to optimize energy use. The units are equipped with Energy Star appliances. Rainwater is harvested and is reused as landscape irrigation. The outdoor air is also filtered for 95 percent particulates. + COOKFOX Architects Images by Frank Oudeman

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Abandoned NYC warehouse is reinvented as LEED Gold-certified apartments

This stunning brick "cave house" in Vietnam is open to the elements

April 17, 2018 by  
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Vietnamese firm H&P Architects has created a unique “cave” fit for human habitation. Their “Brick Cave” townhouse has three levels of brick walls, each one with apertures that create a playful atmosphere of light and shadow throughout the interior. Pockets of greenery accent the brick construction throughout the house, and a vegetable garden on the roof caps off the structure. Built on a corner lot in ?ông Anh, Vietnam, the home is nestled on the street and blends into the urban landscape. The architects chose to use brick in the construction to create not just a unique home design, but one with an ecological shade system. The multiple walls both filter natural light into the home and shade the interior from the region’s searing summer heat. Related: H&P Architects’ Bamboo Homes Float Above Rising Flood Waters on Recycled Oil Drums The idiosyncratic design is a labyrinth of walkways, stairs and angles illuminated by streams of natural light. In fact, to use the sun to the home’s advantages, the architects conducted a number of studies on the sun’s daily positions in relation to the house. Although the apertures may appear a bit random at first sight, they were strategically implemented to keep the home cool in the summer heat while providing as much natural light as possible. According to H&P Architects , the unconventional combination of bricks and greenery was essential to connect the home to its surroundings: “Brick Cave encompasses a chain of space…with random apertures gradually shifting from openness/publicity to closeness/privacy and vice versa. The combination of ‘close’ and ‘open’ creates diverse relations with the surroundings and thus helps blur the boundaries between in and out, houses and streets/alleys, human and nature.” In addition to having various openings, the walls are slanted inwards. This represents another conscious choice on the part of the architects–the slanted walls provide better viewing angles of the surrounding area and add a sense of nature to the design, letting in elements such as rain and wind. Harsh elements are commonly to blame for house flooding in this region, so the architects wanted a resilient design that would aid in protecting the home by letting the elements pass through it rather than crash into it, essentially creating a safe shelter. + H&P Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Nguyen Tien Thanh

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This stunning brick "cave house" in Vietnam is open to the elements

Recycling Mysteries: Brick

November 6, 2017 by  
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The Three Little Pigs will be the first to tell … The post Recycling Mysteries: Brick appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Timber-clad extension reconnects post-war Dutch residence with nature

January 25, 2017 by  
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A brand new layout and addition transformed a post-war brick house in The Netherlands into a modern family home with a new connection to its natural surroundings. Kraal Architecten and Lab-S worked together on renovating the residence in Zeist, introducing a timber-clad extension that contrasts with the original home’s materials. The building underwent an extensive transformation that created a stronger connection between the interior and exterior spaces. The addition, clad in timber , provides views of and relates to the outdoors, while maintaining a clear division between the new and existing parts of the building. Related: Stunning Dutch Renovation is Harmoniously Eclectic Each floor received spatial additions, with the kitchen, bedroom and study located one above the other at the back of the house. A new staircase connects them. The extension also features floor-to-ceiling windows which not only provide views of the garden, but filter in plenty of natural light. + Kraal Architecten + Lab-S Via Archdaily Photos by Ed van Rijswijk

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Timber-clad extension reconnects post-war Dutch residence with nature

Foster + Partners China Resources University opens in Shenzhen

November 1, 2016 by  
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Set atop a hill, the new China Resources University overlooks views towards the South China Sea and accommodates hundreds of students. The campus comprises a management training institute, residential buildings, five teaching building, an invention center, auditoria, library, and gym. The campus is connected to a larger mixed-use development , also designed by Foster + Partners, that includes a hotel, clubhouse, retail, and other residences. Related: Foster + Partners breaks ground on Ferring Pharamceuticals’ headquarters in Copenhagen “The idea was to create a cascading complex of buildings and spaces – a series of teaching and living spaces, terraces and informal streets that encourage interaction and a sense of wellbeing,” said Chris Bubb, architect partner at Foster + Partners. The campus is made primarily from locally fired brick as a nod to Shenzhen’s history of brick masonry buildings. Coarse stones hand-pressed against the bricks before the firing process give the bricks their rough texture, which were then baked at varying temperatures to create different colors to match the different tones of earth in the surrounding area. + Foster + Partners Images via Foster + Partners , by Neil Young

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Foster + Partners China Resources University opens in Shenzhen

Crushed bricks recycled for a cave-like concert hall in Poland

June 1, 2016 by  
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© Jakub Certowicz Located between Torún’s old town, a UNESCO-protected site, and the new development area of the city, the concert hall employs in a very special way two conventional materials: red bricks and white concrete. Each personify a specific historical age and corresponding architectural aesthetics. More precisely, classic red bricks recall the old town streetscape and ancient buildings’ façades. White concrete, on the other hand, represents contemporary architecture. The two materials symbolically fuse old and the new. © Jakub Certowicz Architect Fernando Menis calls this technique cof mixing concrete with other materials “picado” and often employs it in his works. It has been certified by the Spanish and the Polish Building Research Institute. Besides its powerful visual effect, this technique provides excellent acoustic results, which is particularly useful for the CKK Jordanki project. Plus it gives a second life to trashed bricks. Related: Menis Architects’ Agora Garden is a rock-like residential tower wrapped in vegetation © Ma?ogorzata Repli?ska. Courtesy CKK Jordani and Fernando Menis The shape of the building emphasizes the interplay and dichotomy between modern and historic design. While the exterior of the Jordanki Hall features cold, rigid and almost anonymous geometry, its interior is a surprisingly fluid and dynamic cave-like space. Inside, Jordanki is smoothly-shaped and molded to provide necessary space for the program functions. To understand better the nature of the concert hall’s interior space, think of Zurek, a traditional Polish soup served directly in a scooped-out loaf of bread. © Ma?ogorzata Repli?ska. Courtesy CKK Jordani and Fernando Menis The Jordanki Concert Hall is a flexible building that can be easily transformed from a classic opera configuration into a theater, a symphony orchestra, a central scene performance space or even a banquet hall. The hall can also be adapted to a different capacity, shrinking or expanding it like a sponge. + Fernando Menis + Polish architecture Images © Jakub Certowicz, Ma?ogorzata Repli?ska. Courtesy CKK Jordani and Fernando Menis

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“Another brick in the wall” shelves are a modern take on traditional stone bookshelves

March 1, 2016 by  
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Inspired by the traditional shelves in the stone homes of his childhood in Yugoslavia, Zdravko Barisic decided to create modular shelves that challenge the notion of the traditional, linear bookshelf .  Called “Another brick in the wall,” the design is a composition of 7 reclaimed steel modules that can be adjusted on the wall as desired, creating an alternative to the strictness of classic bookshelves. The rust finish on the shelf, combined with the free-form arrangement, calls to mind the ancient bricks of historic villas. The design was featured at Maison et Objet 2016 in Paris and can be purchased through Mabele. + Mabele The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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“Another brick in the wall” shelves are a modern take on traditional stone bookshelves

Google’s driverless car causes an accident for the first time

March 1, 2016 by  
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This week, one of Google’s autonomous vehicles was involved in a minor fender-bender when the car backed into the side of a passing bus. While the self-driving cars have been involved in traffic accidents before , the company has always maintained that the crashes were caused by human drivers sharing the road with the vehicles. In this case, Google is accepting “partial responsibility” for the accident – a first for the company – and is working on changing its software to avoid such incidents in the future. Read the rest of Google’s driverless car causes an accident for the first time

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