New International WELL Building Institute HQ achieves Platinum

July 27, 2020 by  
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The International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) hired midtown Manhattan studio COOKFOX to design its new headquarters with the goal of exceeding its own standards for health-focused work environments. The historic building dates back to 1912, a challenge that the client company welcomed in order to demonstrate WELL standards’ applicability for a wide range of project types. The office space has since achieved WELL Platinum Certification for its commitment to employee wellness. IWBI provides the leading global standard for buildings, interior spaces and communities that support and advance human health and wellness. WELL Certification guidelines are currently being used in 60 countries with over 4,100 buildings either certified or pursuing certification. Related: Newly renovated Seventh Generation HQ focuses on sustainability COOKFOX’s own studio, located near the new IWBI HQ, had already achieved WELL Gold certification back in 2017, so the two companies were able to easily work together to develop strategies. The design emphasized wellness ideals such as the maximization of natural light and air, thoughtful recycled and low-impact building materials and high-filtration air ventilation systems. The office provides healthy food in its kitchens and increases employee connectivity to nature through the use of plants, light and fresh air to encourage an active work style. “With access to natural light, dynamic workstations and a combination of both design and policy elements that support mental resilience, the IWBI team truly felt a sense of ownership and pride in our office space,” said Rick Fedrizzi, CEO of IWBI. “By creating a space that mirrors our values, our journey to certification has been an especially meaningful and enlightening experience for us, and one that we intend to share with our community. The space is more than just a headquarters for our staff; it is an extension of our values and a showcase of what WELL stands for. We invite our community to visit, work and learn with us when we can.” Especially given the current COVID-19 health crisis, IWBI tackled the additional task of ensuring a supplemental virus-free and future-resilient work environment as employees begin to return to work. This included efficient air ventilation and filtration, hand-washing stations, additional cleaning product protocols and food safety. + COOKFOX Photography by Eric Laignel via COOKFOX

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New International WELL Building Institute HQ achieves Platinum

A Rocky Mountain forever home passively offsets heating costs

April 29, 2020 by  
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When Ed and Leigh approached Colorado-based architecture firm F9 Productions to design their custom Rocky Mountain home, the couple wanted a residence that could last well into the future. This meant that the forever home not only had to be engineered with ADA-compliant features, but it also needed to be robust enough to weather the region’s extreme winter conditions for years to come. As a result, the architects crafted the Eastwatch House, a highly durable home that also takes advantage of passive solar conditions to reduce energy demands. Located at an elevation of 8,200 feet in the Rocky Mountain high country, the Eastwatch House is exposed to extremely cold winters, during which highs hover around freezing and 100-mile-per-hour winds and large snowstorms are the norm. Moreover, the site is also at risk of wildfires . To protect the home against these ever-present dangers, the architects constructed it with a steel post-and-beam system with an exterior palette of steel, masonry and glass. The building is topped with a Class A fire-rated TPO roofing and ipe decking. Long roof overhangs protect the home from snow. Related: Breezy caravan-inspired annex uses passive design for thermal comfort Although floor-to-ceiling windows were installed to frame beautiful mountain views, the home manages to stay comfortably warm thanks to hydronic in-floor heating and passive heating strategies. The exposed concrete slab floor and internal brick wall provides a total of 90 metric tons of thermal mass to capture heat during the day. This heat is then slowly dissipated at night. A southeasterly window wall is also key to capturing passive solar heat gain, which accounts for 75% of the home’s heating needs.  Because the clients intend to use the house for many decades, the Eastwatch House was designed with no stairs and features ADA-compliant doors and hallways. The walls were also designed for easy installation of handrails in the future. “Ed and his Leigh have always believed that form must follow function,” the architects said. “In a well thought out system, there must be a reason for everything. Things without reason should be removed. This belief set the tone for the home.” + F9 Productions Images via F9 Productions

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A Rocky Mountain forever home passively offsets heating costs

The spacious Camberwell House reconnects a large family with nature

July 13, 2018 by  
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When a family approached AM Architecture wanting to turn their mid-century modern into a more spacious home with a stronger relationship to the outdoors, the firm had a tall order to fill. The large family wanted a bigger indoor living space to accommodate their numbers and an improved layout that would allow them to reconnect with nature. The result is the 5,920 square-foot Camberwell House in Melbourne . The firm redesigned the existing home and successfully created a comfortable space for the family that embraces indoor-outdoor living. To meet the family’s expectations, the architects created a split-level design for the living areas and re-centered the home’s entry to create a pavilion , which serves as a meeting place for the family and their guests. The pavilion structure has become a focal point of the house, incorporating key elements that serve as the centerpiece of any home: the kitchen, a dining space and living areas complete with a fireplace. To help foster a stronger connection to nature, the architects included large windows throughout the home. These windows, including the floor-to-ceiling glazing, utilize a low-E coating to help block heat in the summer and keep the house cozy and warm in the winter. Large internal brick walls also assist in regulating the indoor climate. Related: Mid-century Eichler home gets a bold remodel into the 21st century Furnishings are a futuristic take on mid-century style and blend well into the wood and glass materials that make up the family home. In the kitchen, cupboards provide plenty of storage space while also concealing appliances. An abundance of shelving proudly displays the residents’ knickknacks. In the living space, bare pendant lighting and a ceramic fireplace mimic the vertical placement of the home as well as nearby trees. The full-height windows fill the common areas with natural light . Thanks to their new location on a higher level in the home, bedrooms offer privacy and serenity for both kids and adults. From their beds, the family can look out to views of the backyard and nearby park. Although the home is two stories, the glass wall seamlessly integrates the two spaces. “This split level addition creates a dramatic new focal point in the house,” the architects said, “that connects all discrete parts of the house and introduces a dramatic relationship to its beautiful, natural surrounds.” + AM Architecture Images via Dianna Snape

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The spacious Camberwell House reconnects a large family with nature

Renovated Vietnamese home ‘sewn’ together with intricate steel threads

February 3, 2017 by  
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Although most people probably wouldn’t like the idea of sewing their house together, Vietnam’s Block Architects have renovated a beautiful house inspired by the homeowner’s handcrafted leather goods business. The architects improved the narrow space by replacing unnecessary floors and walls with massive frames made out of small steel threads “sewn” into the structure, permitting optimal natural light and air ventilation. The entire renovation process was closely linked to the couple’s meticulous business process. “For a product to be accomplished, say a handbag, it takes many processes involving fastidious needlework,” they said. According to the architects, similar detail was essential to the project, “Like meticulous craftsmen, we carefully joined up every part of the house: old ones and new ones, separate ones and shared ones, together with wood, brick, concrete, metal and trees.” Related: Modular renovation in Vietnam makes 107 square feet feel livable Although the white frames might be seen as nothing more than a sentimental nod to the homeowners’ profession, they were actually chosen to let air and natural light penetrate the interior. The structure is quite narrow, so along with removing walls and floors, this feature was strategic to opening up the space. Additionally, the steel frames serve as a nice support for green climbing vines , adding a touch of nature throughout the home. On the brick-walled interior, an old concrete staircase was also removed to let in light. The new staircase was constructed out of floating wooden pieces held together with white rods. Once a dark, crapped space, the home is now illuminated from the roof to the bottom floor, which houses the kitchen and a vertical garden . + Block Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Quang Dam

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Renovated Vietnamese home ‘sewn’ together with intricate steel threads

Poland’s Rozove Cafe captures the feeling of home within a small flexible space

April 28, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Poland’s Rozove Cafe captures the feeling of home within a small flexible space Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: brick walls , herringbone tiles , MFP boards , Mode:Lina , mode:lina architecture studio , natural light , pinkest shop and cafe in Poznan , plywood , Poland , poznan , Rozove Cafe

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Poland’s Rozove Cafe captures the feeling of home within a small flexible space

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