A recycled brick wall runs through this breezy home in Australia

October 19, 2018 by  
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Bright, breezy and surrounded by nature, the Cedar Lane House is a place of peaceful respite on the southern coast of Australia. Sydney-based architect and photographer Edward Birch designed the light-filled residence at the base of a mountain in Meroo Meadow. Spread out across 280 square meters, the linear home is anchored by a recycled brick wall that runs the length of the building and imbues the interior with warmth and softness. The Cedar Lane House is organized into three pavilion-like spaces linked by a central east-west hallway. While indoor-outdoor living is celebrated with ample glazing and a natural materials palette, the views are deliberately obscured from the entrance to create an element of surprise when visitors turn the corner and see spectacular landscape vistas through the living room’s walls of glass. In addition to the whitewashed recycled brick wall, the home interiors are dressed in Australian hardwood, white surfaces and other minimalist materials to keep the focus on the outdoors. The open-plan living spaces — including a living room, dining area and kitchen — occupy the heart of the home and branch off to an outdoor terrace and an indoor lounge on either side. The easternmost side of the home is defined by a master en suite with an outdoor shower and a spa. Three additional bedrooms, a rumpus room and an outdoor courtyard are located on the west side. The arrangement of spaces makes it easy for the homeowner to close off portions of the house depending on the number of people staying. Instead of main water connections, the house relies on recycled rainwater , which is collected in underground tanks and re-circulated around the building. Related: Passive solar home stays naturally cool without AC in Australia “From the recycled bricks, rough oak floor to the zinc bench top in the kitchen, the internal materials are intended to be imperfect, to mark and scratch and to tell the story of the lives lived inside the house,” Birch said in a project statement. “As the timber cladding silvers and the wash on the bricks get eroded away, the house ages gracefully and settles into the landscape around it.” + Edward Birch Via ArchDaily Images by Edward Birch

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A recycled brick wall runs through this breezy home in Australia

The adorable Acorn tiny cabin is made of wood salvaged from an old mansion

October 19, 2018 by  
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We’ve seen a lot of tiny homes over the years, but the Acorn has to be one the most adorable designs we’ve ever come across. Created by the team from Ojai-based Humble Hand Craft, the sweet tiny home on wheels is built from reclaimed wood and felled trees, including the western cedar shingles that were salvaged from a mansion in Montecito, California. At just 16 feet long and 8.5 feet wide, the Acorn is one seriously tiny home on wheels, but its strategic and space-efficient layout makes the interior seem much bigger. Built on a trailer of the same dimensions, the Acorn takes us back to the basics of traditional cabin design with its warm facade of cedar shingles, a corrugated metal roof and a welcoming front porch. Related: This charming, solar-powered tiny home is handcrafted from reclaimed wood According to the builders at Humble Hand Craft, like most of their cabins, the Acorn was made out of wood salvaged from various sources. The Western Red Cedar shingles used to clad the small structure were reclaimed from an old mansion in California. The porch posts were made out of a dead tree that had fallen near one of the builder’s favorite hiking trails in Ojai. Much of the cabin’s interior, such as the trim and the front door, were made out of reclaimed redwood salvaged from a 5,000-gallon wine barrel found at a vineyard in Santa Cruz. The all-wooden interior creates a homey living space, enhanced with an abundance of natural light . A space-efficient layout was essential in designing the interior. To create more living space on the ground floor, a sleeping loft was installed on a platform. The living room, which is big enough for a small sofa and table, is kept warm and cozy thanks to the small wood-burning fireplace. The kitchen features a beautiful redwood countertop finished with a natural bio resin as well as plenty of storage and shelving to avoid clutter. + Humble Hand Craft Photography by Luke Williams via Humble Hand Craft

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The adorable Acorn tiny cabin is made of wood salvaged from an old mansion

Urban Nouveau proposes to turn a historic Stockholm bridge into housing and a park

October 19, 2018 by  
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In a bid to save the historic Gamla Lidingöbron bridge in Stockholm from demolition, Swedish studio Urban Nouveau has proposed transforming the structure into 50 luxury apartments topped with a High Line -inspired linear park. Created as part of a petition to protest the tearing down of the structure, the design aims to spark greater dialogue and media attention in hopes of galvanizing support for the bridge’s preservation. The design practice has also proposed using the sale of apartments to fund the restoration process. Built in the 1920s, the Gamla Lidingöbron bridge has served as a rail and pedestrian connector between Stockholm and the island of Lidingö. The City Council of Lidingö has announced plans to demolish the bridge in 2022 and thus far rejected Urban Nouveau’s proposal to repurpose the historic bridge on the grounds of potential “risks and delays.” The studio has launched a petition to counter the decision with the backing of the project’s master structural engineers Adão da Fonseca and Cecil Balmond who say the project is “both structurally sound and entirely feasible.” “Our architectural understanding of the bridge has inspired us to come up with a plan for saving Gamla Lidingöbron that not only creates a striking public park but in the process also saves the government a minimum of 113 million crowns (€11m),” said Urban Nouveau chief executive Sara Göransson. “We believe demolishing a landmark bridge like this is truly a backward step, particularly when we have a fully costed and technically sound alternative that means we can save the bridge and provide a beautiful park for the whole of Stockholm.” Related: Spectacular town hall doubles as a bridge in Denmark’s Faroe Islands In the  adaptive reuse proposal, the bridge could experience new life as a residential complex of 50 apartments embedded within the steel structure, while the bridge deck would be converted into a linear park with tram and bicycle access. Each apartment would be equipped with a private elevator and staircase for access. The west-facing apartments would feature double-height living spaces and glazed facades on either side to frame sweeping views of the water. + Urban Nouveau Via ArchDaily Images by Urban Nouveau

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Urban Nouveau proposes to turn a historic Stockholm bridge into housing and a park

Wild poolside oasis in Spain disguises offensive grey wall

June 29, 2016 by  
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The Spanish architect ’s challenge was deceptively simple on the surface: transform the private garden’s blighted view into a magical retreat. Prior to tapping Ocaña, the homeowners had struggled with a variety of approaches for softening the stark, grey wall, and abandoned each of those projects along the way. Plans for a living green wall had already been tossed aside, as the homeowner wouldn’t be satisfied with a wall of a different color. Something much more spectacular would have to come along in order to salvage the pool’s previous peaceful atmosphere. Once that mission was realized, and embraced, things got decidedly wild. Related: Gorgeous natural swimming pool uses no chlorine Ocaña’s proposal surmounts countless challenges with an out-of-the box approach to creating a new atmosphere around the pool area. As if in memoriam of the lost sunset view, the architect proposes an arrangement of round mirrors positioned at various heights and angles, in order to capture and reflect the sun at different times of the day. Behind the mirror array, diverse vegetation would create a soft, lush barrier to shield the offending grey wall. In order to pull off such an outlandish renovation, Ocaña’s design had to meet some difficult criteria. Because the concrete wall belongs not to the homeowners but to their neighbors, the new design had to stand independent from the wall, rather than rely on it as a building surface. Additionally, there were other considerations to accommodate, such as existing plants, the pool itself, and a stairway leading to the home’s basement. Hilariously, if those challenges were not enough, the entire structure also had to be modular because, in order to get it into the pool area in the first place, the elements had to be carried through a regular-sized door. So, the final design is comprised of 33 individual modules, which will be assembled to create a forked scaffolding that will also support a network of 60 nebulizers, which spray a mist of water into the air, creating ‘clouds.’ The forks allow the plants to overflow the scaffolding where they please, eventually hiding the bones of the structure and lending to the private microclimate created in this backyard oasis. + Manuel Ocaña Via Archdaily Images via Imagen Subliminal for Manuel Ocaña

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Wild poolside oasis in Spain disguises offensive grey wall

Don’t let Monsanto and Whole Foods kill GMO labeling

June 29, 2016 by  
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A first-of-its-kind law requiring foods sold in Vermont to declare whether or not they contain genetically modified crops is set to take effect on July 1st — unless a national law being considered by Congress passes first. The proposed national legislation would effectively override the regulations outlined by Vermont’s law, delaying any labeling changes for another two years and allowing food manufacturers to place QR codes or 800 numbers on their packaging rather than a plain-English disclosure about GM ingredients. Essentially, lawmakers are trying to pass a GMO labeling law that doesn’t require labels . Food Democracy Now is running a petition against the bill, which you can sign here . DON’T LET CONGRESS KILL GMO LABELING > Not only would this law make it more difficult to tell which foods contain GMOs , the new bill is entirely optional for the corporations it targets and there are no penalties for companies that fail to comply. The language of the bill has even been described as so vague that it would exempt about 85% of the GMOs currently on the market, including Roundup Ready crops owned by Monsanto, which are bred specifically to be sprayed with the weedkiller glyphosate , which has been linked to cancer by the World Health Organization . Related: Vermont Set to Make Mandatory GMO Labeling a State Law The fact that Congress is attempting to override Vermont’s new law is troubling enough, but for many grassroots groups, what’s going on behind the scenes is even more disturbing. According to Food Democracy Now , major natural and organic companies have suddenly changed their tune and sided with the new bill rather than supporting Vermont’s much clearer requirements in a last-minute deal. Among those Food Democracy Now names as “selling out” are Whole Foods Market, Stonyfield Farm, and members of the Organic Trade Association. Related: Hawaii’s Big Island Bans All GMO Crops and Biotech Companies Whether or not you personally believe GM crops pose a threat to human health, people who have concerns about how these plants are grown or the business practices of companies like Monsanto have the right to know what’s in their food and make purchasing decisions accordingly. A number of environmental groups around the country and Senator Bernie Sanders are rallying against this last-minute attempt to undermine Vermont’s lawmakers. If you’d like to send a message to the US Senate protesting this legislative deal, sign the petition now. Via Food Democracy Now Images via Pixabay ( 1 , 2 )

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Don’t let Monsanto and Whole Foods kill GMO labeling

Robot Bricklayer Comes To New York

November 10, 2009 by  
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Archpaper via Ponoko Gramazio & Kohler of Zurich’s ETH Faculty of Architecture have been in TreeHugger before with their bricklaying robot. Now they have come to America for the first time, and have digitally fabricated a wall on Pike Street in downtown Manhattan , with an exhibition running at the

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Robot Bricklayer Comes To New York

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