An energy-optimized extension pierces a renovated brick bungalow

June 4, 2019 by  
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Having outgrown their single-story bungalow, a family approached Ghent-based architectural firm WE-S architecten for an expansion and renovation that would also bolster the home’s energy performance. The architects responded with an unusual proposal: an extension that appears to pierce straight through the existing structure at an angle. Clad in brick , the House TlL in Pittem, Belgium now spans 3,025 square feet with an east-west addition that follows site-specific passive design principles for improved energy performance. The clients’ former bungalow was not only poorly insulated , but also suffered from poor space allocation: a seldom-used indoor garage had occupied about a quarter of the home’s footprint. After conducting site studies, the architects removed the indoor garage and placed it to the front of the brick house in a covered parking pad as part of the new extension. Part of the volume is cut out of the building to maximize daylight, while the covered terrace protects the interior from cold westerly winds. Related: A mountain refuge in Spain is brought back to life with brickwork Walls of glass bring natural light and air into the interiors, which have been renovated to look bright and airy. White-painted walls and a palette of natural materials with pops of greenery help achieve a minimalist aesthetic. The roofline has also been raised to heighten the spacious feel and bring additional light indoors. An open-plan living area, dining room, and kitchen occupy the heart of the brick house. The raised roofline allows for the creation of two rooms on the upper floor, one of which serves as a bedroom. “The project tries to interweave the existing bungalow within its environment with certain simplicity in planning and materialization,” explain the architects in a press release. “Variable room heights play a game of compression and decompression, which has its center of gravity in the double-height living space .” + WE-S architecten Images via Johnny Umans

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An energy-optimized extension pierces a renovated brick bungalow

Here’s how you can recycle and upcycle your yogurt containers

June 4, 2019 by  
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We all want to do the right thing when it comes to recycling. After all, it makes us feel good to know we’re diverting materials from the already-overflowing landfills . But sometimes we inadvertently cause more problems than we solve when we toss items into recycling that contaminate the rest of the goods in the bin. For example, when a material that has come into contact with food rolls down the conveyor belt at the recycling plant, workers have to pull other perfectly acceptable recyclable items from the line simply due to cross-contamination. Yogurt containers are one such item that leave us feeling a little helpless in our efforts to do the right thing. While they do come into contact with food, they may still be recyclable. Then again, they may not. Even if you understand the policy regarding single-use food containers in your area, you have the added ongoing conflict surrounding those little numbers on the bottom of plastic containers. Can you recycle a number 4? Are the containers of one yogurt brand recyclable while others are not? The answer is not black and white. In fact, almost no two recycling centers have the same standards when it comes to what they will or will not accept. The good news is that you can erase the question mark regarding the best way to deal with yogurt containers in your area. Related: DIY: Make delicious homemade yogurt in your slow cooker Step 1. Know your plastic The first step in the process is to investigate the identifying number on the bottom of your container. Yes, these are likely different from one brand to another. Beyond that even, some brands have more than one plastic type for different products. Numbers one and two are commonly recyclable. Number three is rarely recyclable. Number four is commonly recyclable, but perhaps not via curbside pickup. Number five is hit and miss for mainstream recyclability. Number six is rarely recyclable or recycled and is bad for the environment . Finally, number seven is a mixture of plastics that is rarely recyclable. Yogurt containers are most commonly number 5 or 6 plastic, which does nothing to answer the question as to whether you can recycle it or not. Step 2. Contact your recycle center The most accurate answer to your query will come directly from your local curbside recycling provider. While some will accept packaging labeled one to seven, some will only take non-food plastic . Yet, others only commit to the cleaner numbers one or two. Check out the website or send them an email. You can also give them a call, but note that many times the centralized call center won’t have reliable information about the recycling in your area. Facilities vary widely from one location to the next. Plus, protocol is constantly changing based on many factors, most recently the limitations implemented by China. Step 3. Alternatives The short answer here is that there is no easy answer, and it depends on both the capabilities of the facility and the plastic used in the production of the yogurt container. If your curbside service doesn’t allow it, look for a local facility that does accept lower grade plastic. If you have a Whole Foods in your area, look for Gimme 5 drop boxes near the front of the store or mail your clean, empty yogurt cups back to Preserve . Step 4. Other alternatives If you don’t find a viable way to recycle your plastic yogurt containers, it might be time to switch to a brand that serves it up in glass instead. Alternately, you can easily make your own yogurt with recipes that allow it to sit in the oven overnight. Or you can rely on a yogurt maker or Insta-pot for the same effect. Of course, yogurt containers can be useful around the house, too. Here are just a few ways you can put them to work: If they have a lid, use them to store paper clips, thumb tacks, hair bands, buttons, cotton balls, jewelry when you travel and any number of other small items throughout the house and garage. Used yogurt containers can also be used for other food items. Pack your nuts, berries or Goldfish in them, or take your dressings, sauces and dips on the road. Due to the size and shape of yogurt containers, they’re great for pantry items like flour and also cleaning products like the bucket of Oxy-clean or dishwasher detergent . For gardening , poke a few holes in the bottom, fill with soil and add seeds. Yogurt cups make a great small and available planter when you’re starting out plants prior to transplant. If you have children, yogurt containers might be the only bath toy you need. Prepare for endless filling and dumping or drill holes in the bottom so your child can watch it run through. They are also great in the sandbox when building a castle or just watching the sand cascade to the earth. Crafting— yogurt containers can reign in small supplies like tiny clips, stickers or googly eyes. Plus, they make great containers for Play-doh or fingerpainting when the kids are looking for an artsy outlet. Even without a clear cut answer as to whether your yogurt containers are recyclable, you can have a plan to make conscientious purchases (avoid number 6 and buy glass if you can), locate more information about local recycling resources and find ways to upcycle your containers to provide more than a single use. Via Preserve , LifeHacker Images via Shutterstock

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Here’s how you can recycle and upcycle your yogurt containers

Swanky laneway house in Melbourne is built of recycled red brick

August 11, 2017 by  
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Austin Maynard Architects continues their valiant fight against the cookie-cutter McMansions of Australia with a beautiful new project built of recycled red brick. Located in Richmond, Melbourne within a laneway, the Brickface is a compact house addition at the end of the existing building’s rear yard. The modern and playful extension includes a garage on the ground level, studio living/guest suite above, and a roof deck. Brickface stands out from its laneway neighbors thanks to its recycled red brick facade, large round windows, sculptural form, and garage doors that are painted black instead of white to recede into the building face. The side of the extension facing the main house features an eye-catching outdoor spiral staircase, as well as a playful extruded pattern of red and blue glazed brick from the PGH Vibrant range. A new entertaining space with a pool and terrace was built between the existing home’s main living area and Brickface. “Melbourne’s property market is so inflated, that we’re now seeing a generation that are not only unable to buy a home, but also struggling to find affordable places to rent close to their work, school and community,” wrote Austin Maynard Architects. “ Melbourne does have one trick up its sleeve that many parents are increasingly exploring. Melbourne is strewn with under-utilised laneways and many home owners are creating a second residence in their backyard with frontage to the laneway, where their adult children can live during university and early employment. These second residences are becoming fully independent studio homes for adult children, allowing them to save and plan, whilst continuing to contribute to the essence of Melbourne’s most vibrant and cultural suburbs.” Related: Austin Maynard Architects restores a beach shack in their crusade against McMansions Flexibility was built into Brickface’s design. The ground-floor garage can be easily adapted into a large living space or even an office. The high-ceilinged contemporary interiors are filled with natural light and the walls painted a bright light blue. The accessible roof terrace can be used for entertaining and as garden space. + Austin Maynard Architects Images by Tess Kelly

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Swanky laneway house in Melbourne is built of recycled red brick

Renovated 1970s brick beach house in Australia gets new life with an elegant timber screen

December 6, 2016 by  
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A 1970s modernist brick beach house in Noosa, Australia , received a modern makeover that transformed it into a gorgeous subtropical retreat. In charge of the renovation , Teeland Architects retained as much of the existing building as possible, while making sure to take best advantage of the amazing site that backs into a rainforest. The architects modernized the existing brick house, created better relationships with the surroundings, and replaced the unflattering rough dark brown brick facade with a more elegant design. They rendered the brick in a natural cement finish and designed a beautiful timber screen for the street-facing facade. Related: Modern Renovation of an 1850’s Australian Farm House They carved out a series of new openings in the rear wall so that bedrooms and bathrooms have unobstructed views of the gorgeous subtropical landscape. One of the most unique design elements are the semi-outdoor bathrooms that overlook the national park . These reference the original shower units that sat on the back deck. + Teeland Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Jared Fowler

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Renovated 1970s brick beach house in Australia gets new life with an elegant timber screen

PHOOEY Architects’ Cubo House extension incorporates salvaged materials from the home’s old staircase

June 1, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of PHOOEY Architects’ Cubo House extension incorporates salvaged materials from the home’s old staircase Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Australian architects , brick house# , green renovation , Melbourne , natural light , phooey architects , Recycled Materials , salvaged materials , upcycling , Victorian-era house

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PHOOEY Architects’ Cubo House extension incorporates salvaged materials from the home’s old staircase

Solar-powered Valley House blends industrial chic with rural Tasmanian elements

June 1, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Solar-powered Valley House blends industrial chic with rural Tasmanian elements Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: blackwood timber , double-glazed windows , energy efficient architecture , heat pump technology , Launceston , LEDs , natural lighting , natural ventilation , northern exposure , Philip M Dingemanse , Solar Power , solar powered house , tasmania , Tasmanian timber , Valley House , Valley House by Philip M Dingemanse

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Solar-powered Valley House blends industrial chic with rural Tasmanian elements

Passively-cooled Termitary House in Vietnam is wrapped in perforated brick walls

February 9, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Passively-cooled Termitary House in Vietnam is wrapped in perforated brick walls Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: brick facade , brick house# , concrete home , green renovation , passive cooling , perforated brick , perforated facade , skylights , Tropical space , Vietnam , vietnamese architects

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Passively-cooled Termitary House in Vietnam is wrapped in perforated brick walls

Beautiful Wooden Addition Strikes Contrast With an Old Brick House in Belgium

September 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Beautiful Wooden Addition Strikes Contrast With an Old Brick House in Belgium Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adn Architectures , belgian architecture , belgium , green renovation , house addition , House AND , pavilion home , pitched roof , pitched roof houses , prefab home , standardized housing , wooden architecture , wooden facade

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Beautiful Wooden Addition Strikes Contrast With an Old Brick House in Belgium

Eye-Catching Long Brick House Showcases 100 Meters of Books in Hungary

August 28, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Eye-Catching Long Brick House Showcases 100 Meters of Books in Hungary Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , brick homes , contemporary home design , farmhouse architecture , foldes architects , hungarian architecture , Long Brick House , residential design

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Eye-Catching Long Brick House Showcases 100 Meters of Books in Hungary

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