A huge moving wall turns this tiny home into party central

May 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A huge moving wall turns this tiny home into party central

Tiny Heirloom  is known for building exquisite  tiny houses on wheels, but their latest home is geared to raise the roof. While most tiny homes are designed as living or vacation spaces for couples or smaller families, the high-end Breezeway home was strategically designed for socializing. The modern cabin is equipped with a wet bar and a large garage-door wall that opens up completely to make room for guests. The tiny home is built on a 32-foot-long triple-axle trailer, so it can be towed virtually anywhere. Clad in a mix of standing seam recycled steel and tight knot tongue and groove cedar and topped with a cool butterfly roof, the home has a rustic but sophisticated look. This modern cabin feel continues on the inside, which was laid out with socializing in mind. Most tiny homes don’t factor in the need for social space, but the Breezeway’s interior design was left relatively empty to create a flexible area. Related: Tiny Heirloom’s luxury micro homes let you live large in small spaces There is enough room for ample seating and a table. The home has two main doors: a regular wooden door and a large garage-style door, which opens up the interior and creates a fun indoor/outdoor party area. Adjacent to the kitchen, a pop-up TV is perfect for movie nights or game days. On one side of the living room, the spacious kitchen provides full-size appliances to prepare food for large groups. At the heart of the area is a wet bar with a large seating area . The sleeping loft, which is large enough for a double bed, is accessible by ladder. A skylight floods the space with natural light . A TV mounted on a swivel and connected to a Bose sound system can be viewed from the bedroom or kitchen. + Tiny Heirloom Via New Atlas Photography by Shelsi Lindquist via Tiny Heirloom

More here:
A huge moving wall turns this tiny home into party central

Stunning Lake Michigan home is built from dying ash reclaimed onsite

October 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Stunning Lake Michigan home is built from dying ash reclaimed onsite

This stunning timber home by the lake sensitively embraces its Midwestern landscape with its design and use of local, reclaimed materials. Designed by Desai Chia Architects in collaboration with Environment Architects (AOR) , the Michigan Lake House boasts stunning lake views and a striking folded roof. The site-sensitive home features a native plant palette and stormwater management in addition to locally sourced and salvaged materials. Located on a woodland bluff, the 4,800-square-foot Michigan Lake House comprises three offset structures: one for the communal areas, including the living room, kitchen, and covered terrace; and the two others that separately house the master bedroom suite and three children’s bedrooms. A dining area breezeway connects the three structures. The undulating roof takes inspiration from the natural rolling terrain as well as the vernacular architecture of nearby fishing villages. The roof also cantilevers over the south end of the home to provide shade for the lakeside-viewing terrace. Related: Exquisite Shore House is a modernist triumph that embraces nature Shou Sugi Ban timber—charred to protect the wood from rot and pests—clads the exterior to blend the home into the landscape. The use of dark timber continues inside the home but is offset by light-colored ash, which was inhabitat.com/tag/reclaimed-materials reclaimed onsite and milled into custom furnishings, flooring, ceiling panels, and trim work. “The interiors of the house embody the indigenous landscape that once thrived with old growth ash,” wrote the architects. Locally sourced stone was used for the outdoor seating areas, pathways, and steps. + Desai Chia Architects + Environment Architects Images via Desai Chia Architects

Read more from the original source: 
Stunning Lake Michigan home is built from dying ash reclaimed onsite

Beautiful modern barn produces food sustainably in Utah

August 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Beautiful modern barn produces food sustainably in Utah

Located in Pleasant Grove on a narrow three-acre lot, the land belonging to Snuck Farm—also known as the Fugal Farm—was first settled in the late 1800s by the Fugal family, who continues to farm the land today. To make the most of the limited acreage, the farm uses hydroponic farming methods in addition to organic farming practices. Lloyd Architects’ design puts those practices on display with three glass greenhouses located in the north. Related: Black Barn is a self-sustaining, off-grid version of historical English architecture The main barn building is organized along a central north-south breezeway that divides the building into two halves. On the west is a community kitchen and lounge that receives visitors, while the opposite side contains office space and the animal living quarters. While its gabled form, fieldstone walls, and exposed timber beams offer a rustic appearance, the interior uses minimal and modern materials and textures to create a contemporary feel. “The main structure’s simple agrarian form and raw materials reflect the simplicity of function and the character of the family that inhabits this place,” said the architects. + Lloyd Architects Via Dezeen Images via Lloyd Architects

Read the original post:
Beautiful modern barn produces food sustainably in Utah

Gorgeous tiny home on wheels blends midcentury and boho style in Austin

August 26, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Gorgeous tiny home on wheels blends midcentury and boho style in Austin

Read the rest of Gorgeous tiny home on wheels blends midcentury and boho style in Austin

Read the rest here:
Gorgeous tiny home on wheels blends midcentury and boho style in Austin

UK farmer grows his own eco home from sustainable hemp crops

August 26, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on UK farmer grows his own eco home from sustainable hemp crops

When UK farmer Nick Voase switched his croplands from potatoes to hemp after severe flooding in 2007, he probably didn’t know he’d one day be using part of his harvest to build a home. Fast forward to 2015 and the Voase family lives in an amazing eco-hemp house , held together with lime, that keeps cool in the summer and warm in the winter. For Voase, the journey to growing his own house was full of twists and turns, but the results were well worth the ride. Read the rest of UK farmer grows his own eco home from sustainable hemp crops

See the original post here: 
UK farmer grows his own eco home from sustainable hemp crops

Bad Behavior has blocked 1298 access attempts in the last 7 days.