Boston outlines its plans to adapt to rising sea levels

October 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Boston outlines its plans to adapt to rising sea levels

Boston , Massachusetts recently announced specific infrastructure projects and policies that must be implemented for the low-laying, water-surrounded city to adjust to expected sea level rise in the coming decades. A comprehensive report outlines short-term and long-term solutions in hopes of protecting communities from what is expected to be a three-foot sea level rise by 2070. “Climate change is here. It’s happening now,” said Boston Mayor Marty Walsh. “It’s more important than ever that we work together to make sure our city is ready for the changes ahead.” Two potential measures outlined in the report include raising a section of Main Street in Charlestown and building a seawall in East Boston, both of which are in neighborhoods that have experienced increasingly frequent and severe flooding in recent years. Founded in 1630, Boston, the only state capital in the contiguous United States located on the ocean, was built to take advantage of its marine location. Boston Harbor’s depth and relatively protected location thanks to dozens of harbor islands helped Boston to become a major port city in the British Colonies and later the early United States. As the city grew in population, landfill taken from nearby hills was used to cover the marshland surrounding the narrow peninsula and create new land, including the Back Bay neighborhood. Although Boston has tackled environmental challenges in the past, including a massive late 20th century clean-up of the harbor and nearby rivers, sea level rise of up to three feet in only 50 years time represents an unprecedented threat. Related: Boston man crosses harbor in a pumpkin boat If Main Street in Charlestown, historically a working-class community and now one of the city’s most expensive neighborhoods, were to be elevated, it would cost at least $2-3 million. This project would block all but the most extreme storm surges from flooding the area, protecting 250 residents and 60 businesses. In total, the mitigation projects for Charlestown alone could cost up to $62 million, though the report estimates that they would offer $201 million in economic benefits. In contrast, a retractable seawall in East Boston would protect 4,300 residents, at least 70 businesses, and cost only $100,000. Although not included in the recent report, Boston is also considering a massive sea wall across Boston Harbor to protect the entire city against rising sea levels. Will other cities follow suit? + Coastal Resilience Solutions Via WCVB Images via Depositphotos (1)

Read more from the original source:
Boston outlines its plans to adapt to rising sea levels

Boston public schools phase in new map to decolonize curriculum

March 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Boston public schools phase in new map to decolonize curriculum

The global map on which all your geographical knowledge is based probably wasn’t as accurate as you thought. For nearly 500 years, classrooms have referred to the Mercator projection, which exaggerated the size of continents in the northern hemisphere. But now Boston public schools are switching over to the Gall-Peters projection, which attempts to correct the sizes of countries and could have a dramatic impact on students’ worldview. The Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator devised the Mercator projection all the way back in 1569. Now hundreds of years later, Boston schools are implementing a replacement, and director of the Boston public schools history department Natacha Scott says they believe they are the first public school district in America to make the switch. Related: New map reveals the world’s most toxic countries The Mercator projection has informed our collective worldview for centuries, but Mercator made it seem as if North America and Europe were larger than South America and Africa , for example. He also moved the equator, which places Germany near the map’s middle instead of much further north. Arno Peters, a German historian, released his projection in 1974 – as it corresponds with work by James Gall, a 19th century Scottish cartographer; today it’s called the Peters or Gall-Peters projection. Now in Boston classrooms, teachers have put the Gall-Peters projection up next to the Mercator projection. Colin Rose, Assistant Superintendent of Opportunity and Achievement Gaps for the Boston Public Schools, told The Guardian, “This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools…It’s important that students trust the material they are given in school but also question it. The Mercator projection is a symbolic representation that put Europe at the center of the world. And when you continue to show images of the places where people’s heritage is rooted that is not accurate, that has an effect on students.” But some people say the Gall-Peters projection is also distorted – stemming mainly from the fact that it’s difficult to place a three dimensional sphere shape on a two dimensional piece of paper. Sizes are correct in the Gall-Peters projection, but shapes are wrong: near the poles countries are stretched horizontally and near the equator they’re stretched vertically, according to Business Insider, which pointed to four alternatives , including the Winkel tripel projection which National Geographic adopted in 1998. Via The Guardian and Business Insider Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Here is the original post: 
Boston public schools phase in new map to decolonize curriculum

Ancient microbes survive inside massive cave crystals for 50,000 years

February 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ancient microbes survive inside massive cave crystals for 50,000 years

Scientists have found strange, ancient microbes in Mexico’s Naica crystal caves that could be around 50,000 years old. Although the caves are so hot they’ve been described as hell – while also being so magical they’ve been described as Fairyland – the microbes have survived for thousands of years trapped in crystals . A biologist who studied the microbes referred to them as super life. Scientists discovered 40 different microbe strains and some viruses in the caves. The microbes are so bizarre that even their closest relatives are genetically 10 percent different, which is about as far away as mushrooms and humans, according to NASA Astrobiology Institute director Penelope Boston, who recently presented the research. The dormant microbes survived on minerals like manganese and iron. Related: Researchers discover that architecture has an impact on which microbes thrive around you The Naica caves are a great example of an extreme environment. Found by miners only around 100 years ago, the caves were isolated from the rest of the world for centuries until a mining company commenced drilling. According to Phys.org, some of the caves are as colossal as cathedrals , and are covered in crystals. But the magnificent caves are so sweltering the researchers could work for just about 20 minutes before retreating to a cool room around 100 degrees Fahrenheit. They wore inexpensive space suits and kept ice packs on their bodies. The find doesn’t claim the prize for oldest extreme life – years ago scientists wrote about living microbes trapped in salt and ice that may be around half a million years old. But Boston told the BBC the microbes her team found are extraordinary because “they are not very closely related to anything in the known genetic databases” and scientists can add the recently found microbes “to this atlas of possibilities that we can apply to different planetary settings.” The findings draw on nine years of research, but have not yet been published in a journal. Boston aims to run more genetic tests on the microbes, but did present the find at the recent American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Boston, Massachusetts late last week. Via the BBC and Phys.org Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Originally posted here: 
Ancient microbes survive inside massive cave crystals for 50,000 years

Want to learn about aggregated energy deals? A university lesson

October 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Want to learn about aggregated energy deals? A university lesson

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston Medical Center and Post Office Square Redevelopment Corp. plan the largest aggregated commercial and industrial renewable energy deal in the Eastern U.S.

View post:
Want to learn about aggregated energy deals? A university lesson

Why General Growth ranks among the top 10 solar buyers

October 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Why General Growth ranks among the top 10 solar buyers

This mall operator owns more than 30.2 MW of capacity, and it’s installing more.

Here is the original:
Why General Growth ranks among the top 10 solar buyers

Floating bridge transforms a crumbling historic Boston bridge into a moving event space

October 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Floating bridge transforms a crumbling historic Boston bridge into a moving event space

Originally built in 1908, the Northern Avenue Bridge spans Fort Point Channel, connecting the financial district with a blossoming tech center. The bridge was designed to pivot on a concrete drum to allow boats to pass, an engineering innovation that made the bridge an icon of its era. The bridge is currently closed to the public, due to its poor condition. PLA now proposes transforming the historic structure into a floating bridge that would crisscross the harbor. The proposal envisions tethering the bridge at the pier at Spectacle Island during the summer, and in the fall and spring, the floating bridge could dock in the Charlestown Navy Yard. The floating bridge could also serve as additional event space square footage during festival seasons. Related: Paul Lukez Architecture and team are designing a self-sustaining resilient coastal community near Boston PLA has confirmed with a structural engineer that the existing bridge, although not suitable for use in its current state, could be refurbished as part of the adaptive reuse project. A floating version of the bridge could be towed or motor-propelled, and the proposal includes the installation of solar panels wrapping its upper members to create a canopy while generating renewable energy. As is the case with so many PLA projects, this proposal was produced by an interdisciplinary team of designers, architects, and engineers assembled specifically for this project. In addition to Lukez himself, other contributors include Tania Bronsoiler, Josh McDonald, Matt Uminski, Andrew Luy, Darquin Fortuna, and structural engineer Jennifer McClain of RSE Associates, Inc . Boston mayor Martin J. Walsh, along with the Boston Society of Architects/AIA (BSA), hosted a design competition earlier in the year, calling for ideas to repurpose the existing bridge. The winning design suggests turning the bridge into a permanent botanical garden and greenhouse for pedestrian travel only. Other proposals include transforming the bridge into a hotel, an underground tunnel with a glass roof, and an updated take on the original rotating bridge design. + Paul Lukez Architecture Images via Paul Lukez Architecture except existing bridge photo by Peter Vanderwarker

Here is the original: 
Floating bridge transforms a crumbling historic Boston bridge into a moving event space

Rehabilitated Longroiva’s Hotel & Thermal Spa blends into the countryside of northeast Portugal

October 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Rehabilitated Longroiva’s Hotel & Thermal Spa blends into the countryside of northeast Portugal

The thermal baths are located in Mêda, a municipality in northeast Portugal, and go back to Roman times. Built in the late 19th century, the existing Thermal Spa was rehabilitated to accommodate 17 rooms and various common areas where guests can meet and socialize. A walkway connects the existing building to the addition, which comprises five room modules built along the slope, with several gathering spaces in between them. Related: Thermal Pool Wrapped With a Living Wall Service areas and 10 new bungalows are located above the rooms. By combining traditional references and modern architecture, the development establishes a dialogue with its natural surroundings while providing its guests with a contemporary facility. + Rebelo de Andrade Via Archdaily Photos by Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

Originally posted here:
Rehabilitated Longroiva’s Hotel & Thermal Spa blends into the countryside of northeast Portugal

Dozens of diseased birds fall from the sky in Boston

September 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Dozens of diseased birds fall from the sky in Boston

In Boston, 47 grackles rained down from the sky above the Dorchester neighborhood last Thursday. 32 of the birds died at the scene or shortly after, and two cats that may have had contact with the birds also died. So far, the cause is unknown. Witnesses describe a chaotic scene, with birds attempting to fly from tree to tree and then weakly falling to the ground. The grackles, a type of songbird that travel in flocks, have been sent to Tufts University in order to determine the cause of death. Some potential possibilities include poisoning, a virus, or environmental pollution . Results are expected next week, but in the meantime, pet owners have been advised to keep their animals indoors. Related: Study shows mass die-offs of birds, fish and marine invertebrates increasing This isn’t the first time a mass bird die-off has spooked scientists. Earlier this year, thousands of dead birds washed up on Alaska’s coast – the birds were thought to have starved to death due to climate change disrupting their food supplies. In fact, a 2015 study found that mass die-off events involving birds, fish, and marine invertebrates had increased in number and magnitude over the past 70 years . Via The Guardian Images via  Phillip Cowan and  Ken Gibson

Here is the original post: 
Dozens of diseased birds fall from the sky in Boston

Amtrak to launch next-gen high-speed trains in US in five years

August 29, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Amtrak to launch next-gen high-speed trains in US in five years

In a big leap forward for American railroad transportation, Amtrak is accepting a $2.45 billion loan from the federal government to improve its technology . The project will span over the next several years and include the addition of 28 next-generation high-speed trains, major upgrades to four major Northeastern stations, and tons of amenities to draw in more passengers. When Amtrak ’s new trains hit the tracks in 2021, travelers will have a high-tech transportation option unmatched by any other in the country. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WH-3FsmU6KQ Vice President Joe Biden made the historic announcement at the station that bears his name in Wilmington, Delaware on Friday, noting that the bulk of the loan—around $2 billion—is earmarked for the new high-tech train cars . Once they are put into service, the new cars will increase the Acela fleet by 40 percent. The new additions will be decidedly next-generation in nature, with one-third more rider capacity, additional outlets and USB connections, better Wi-Fi, and the ability to travel as fast as 186 miles per hour. Related: Amtrak teams with Google to create a real-time train locator map “This is a serious, serious upgrade,” Biden said during his announcement. “One out of every three jobs (in the country) are here, along this corridor… you’d need seven more lanes on I-95 to accommodate the traffic if Amtrak shut down.” Amtrak’s new cars are promised to be 95 percent USA-made, built primarily in New York by Alstom. The 28 new cars will service the Northeast Corridor (NEC) between Boston and Washington D.C., and are expected to reduce energy usage by 20 percent. The increased passenger capacity combined with higher speed and lower energy consumption could represent a major win for travelers and commuters, as well as the surrounding environment. The remaining $450 million of the federal loan will be used to upgrade four major Northeast Amtrak stations, including Union Station in Washington DC and Penn Station in New York City. The railroad infrastructure between Boston and D.C. will also get a long-awaited sprucing up. All work is expected to be completed by 2021. Via Engadget Images via Amtrak and Wikipedia

Read more: 
Amtrak to launch next-gen high-speed trains in US in five years

10 brilliant communal designs helping people work and live together

August 29, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 10 brilliant communal designs helping people work and live together

1. WeWork and WeLive WeWork is an internationally recognized concept with luxury communal working spaces situated across the globe. Their membership plans allow freelancers and entrepreneurs to work at any WeWork space in the world. They’ve recently expanded their successful brand to include WeLive , a line of fully-furnished apartment complexes that boast communal workspaces, kitchens, roof decks, and even hot tubs. 2. Neuehouse Neuehouse is another urban co-working space that caters itself to creatives. Based in New York, Los Angeles, and London, Neuehouse transforms vacated and industrial buildings into multi-level communal workspaces that include screening rooms, broadcast studios, dining spaces and conference rooms, all centered around a modernist and artistic aesthetic. 3. 17th century London church by Tom Dixon Designer Tom Dixon transformed a 17th century London church into a contemplative co-working space for Clerkenwell Design Week . He installed some of his own lighting and furniture designs, including a chandelier made of CURVE lights and geometric tables and chairs. The project was inspired by vicar Andrew Baughen, who hoped to make the church more accessible to local creatives. 4. Coworkrs Brooklyn Leeser Architects transformed an old Brooklyn factory into this vibrant co-working space near the Gowanus Canal. The converted warehouse combines striking pops of color with the raw, industrial edge of the original building. The forward-thinking design features suspended LED lighting, glass conference room alcoves, and angular staircases. 5. Hoffice Some freelancers are drawn to majestic spaces; others wish for more down-to-earth offices . Swedish project Hoffice is perfect for those who want a home atmosphere but have trouble being productive alone. Hoffice helps freelancers turn their own apartments and homes into shared co-working spaces where others can come work – for free. Many have been drawn to the Hoffice idea; people in Southeast Asia, Australia, and North America have hosted events so far. 6. B:Hive Six friends outfitted a unique co-working space in Connecticut with the goal to ” create something that couldn’t be replicated .” They scoured thrift stores to find furniture and furnishings to upcycle into a funky “anti-office,” B:Hive Bridgeport . Complete with decorations from a Ping Pong table to a bicycle desk and barn wood tables, their hive offers a vibrant space for creatives looking to connect with the community. 7. 1975 ferry transformed as a buoyant work/live space Architect Olle Lundberg often works with salvaged materials . He found a 1975 ferry in Iceland, the Maritol, and brought it to San Francisco , where he worked his magic. Lundberg converted the ferry into a space where he lived and worked with his wife before selling it to Kahle and Creon Levit, who turned the old ship into a co-working space affectionately called the ” Icebreaker .” 8. Solar-powered Coboat catamaran Coboat offers the opportunity for digital nomads to take to the seas and live and work aboard a wind – and solar -powered catamaran . Desalination provides water for the boat dwellers as they live a ” zero carbon footprint ” lifestyle on the ocean . Seating outdoors and indoors allows freelancers to take full advantage of the experience. 9. Mexico City helipad converted into a co-working space and garden Coca-Cola decided it no longer needed its rooftop helipad in a Mexico City office. So they asked Rojkind Arquitectos and AGENT to renovate the helipad into a garden and co-working space. Called Foro Ciel , the space features a green roof sprouting native plants that includes an ” integrated solar system “. Walkways through the garden offer inspiring panoramic views of the city. 10. 19th century factory in Madrid inspired by Picasso Google tasked Jump Studios with converting a 19th century Madrid factory into a campus that can house ” 7,000 workers and 50 resident start-ups .” The architecture and design firm created a bold space that incorporates the building’s brick walls. For the colors decorating the factory , Jump Studios drew inspiration from painters Joaquín Sorolla and Picasso. Images via WeWork , Neuehouse , Tom Dixon , Leeser Architecture , Hoffice by David Wild and Amrit Daniel Forss, Peter DaSilva at The New York Times , B:Hive Bridgeport Facebook , Coboat , ©Jaime Navarro courtesy of Rojkind Arquitectos, and Jump Studios

Original post: 
10 brilliant communal designs helping people work and live together

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1271 access attempts in the last 7 days.